Updated Post II Acceptance Rates 2023

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What ISP do you have? One or two niche internet providers are false positive flagging it. Can send the form in to fix it if I know who you have.
First of all, thank you for your immense contributions here, we truly appreciate it! I'm sure everyone feels a little less neurotic after this.
I can access the website using my LTE on mobile, I have Mint Mobile.
As for my PC, I cannot access the website using chrome, firefox, or explorer. My ISP is Optimum.
 
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First of all, thank you for your immense contributions here, we truly appreciate it! I'm sure everyone feels a little less neurotic after this.
I can access the website using my LTE on mobile, I have Mint Mobile.
As for my PC, I cannot access the website using chrome, firefox, or explorer. My ISP is Optimum.
Yeah having issues with Optimum/Spectrum and a few people on Comcast/Xfinity had the same issue. I sent in all the forms required for the site to be whitelisted on their network, should just take a few days.
 
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Released new secondary feature. Hope you all like it :)

 
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Thanks for making this! I noticed that most people directed to the site are interested in the post-II acceptance rates but struggle at first to find them (myself included TBH). Would it make sense to make the advanced tab the default so the info is more readily available? Or maybe you could show an overlay on first visit to point out what the advanced tab is and where the IS/OOS drop-down is (since I also noticed people tend to miss that)?

The second suggestion would be to have some kind of disclaimer or footnote saying where the data comes from. I’ve seen a lot of people online show skepticism without recognizing the amount of hard work and due diligence you put into collecting this data.

You’re a legend for giving us neurotic applicants some peace of mind during this stressful time, and I hope you get into all your dream schools this cycle!

Good point, I’ll look into whether it makes sense to make advanced default.

For sourcing, maybe I can include another column and then provide the link for where it came from (school website, etc)? I was struggling with making space for an extra column in the table and a simple footer wouldn’t work because each school has a different link. Will try to make an extra column work I guess.
 
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Good point, I’ll look into whether it makes sense to make advanced default.

For sourcing, maybe I can include another column and then provide the link for where it came from (school website, etc)? I was struggling with making space for an extra column in the table and a simple footer wouldn’t work because each school has a different link. Will try to make an extra column work I guess.
Can you maybe just hyperlink the school names in the same column?
 
Can you maybe just hyperlink the school names in the same column?
We could do that but I feel that students would expect like school-related information (tuition, deadlines, etc) when clicking on the name rather than stats. I'll think about it more and see what's possible although this is another alternative that might work.
 
Just released the new curriculums tab here. Will make a proper post tomorrow but tried to get this out quickly for the applicants making school decisions before the 15th.

A few schools are missing (didn't want to add any info that wasn't 100% confirmed by both the school and students) so it will take time to fully fill it out.

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On the compare tab you can compare schools side by side which is neat as well.

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@HappyRabbit You're the GOAT man.

Just FYI, Harvard is 1.5 preclinical now.
Haha, will update thanks! If you spot anything else let me know - it's really hard to validate everything and with all the curriculums changing keeping track is difficult. I think I might add a report button directly on the site to help with keeping it up to date on top of my manual reviewing.

I found 1 year preclinical info here, I assume they're changing their curriculum for the incoming class?

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Haha, will update thanks! If you spot anything else let me know - it's really hard to validate everything and with all the curriculums changing keeping track is difficult. I think I might add a report button directly on the site to help with keeping it up to date on top of my manual reviewing.

I found 1 year preclinical info here, I assume they're changing their curriculum for the incoming class?

View attachment 385480
PCE is what they call our clerkships. They switched from 1 to 1.5 preclinical for the class entering in 2023.

You can find the curriculum map here.
 
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PCE is what they call our clerkships. They switched from 1 to 1.5 preclinical for the class entering in 2023.

You can find the curriculum map here.
Oh lol totally misread that as preclinical haha, appreciate it :) I think it would be beneficial to add a link to each schools curriculum map to the table as well.
 
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Just released the new curriculums tab here. Will make a proper post tomorrow but tried to get this out quickly for the applicants making school decisions before the 15th.

A few schools are missing (didn't want to add any info that wasn't 100% confirmed by both the school and students) so it will take time to fully fill it out.

View attachment 385468

On the compare tab you can compare schools side by side which is neat as well.

View attachment 385469
Sorry, what is AOA and MSPE adjectives?
 
Sorry, what is AOA and MSPW adjectives?
AOA is the Alpha Omega Alpha honor society that up to 15-20% of a medical school class can earn. It's basically a form of student ranking that allows students to distinguish themselves from their peers in residency applications.

MSPE adjectives are codewords in the MSPE letter (dean's letter) that rank medical students against their peers, like AOA, into quartiles when applying to residencies. Near the bottom of the letter in the summaritve comments section, the dean will use adjectives (such as outstanding, excellent, very good, good, etc) to describe a student and each code word is assigned to a percentile or quartile in the class.

For example, "Happy Rabbit is an outstanding student" means that I'm in the 90-100th percentile of my class, "good student" means i'm in the 10-33rd percentile, and "capable" means I'm in the bottom 10% of my class. This is an example from OSU.

Generally when students have the option, they prefer attending schools that don't have AOA, MSPE adjectives, tiered grading for preclerkships/clerkships, since it makes the environment of the school more collaborative and less about competing for the highest grades.

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AOA is the Alpha Omega Alpha honor society that up to 15-20% of a medical school class can earn. It's basically a form of student ranking that allows students to distinguish themselves from their peers in residency applications.

MSPE adjectives are codewords in the MSPE letter (dean's letter) that rank medical students against their peers, like AOA, into quartiles when applying to residencies. Near the bottom of the letter in the summaritve comments section, the dean will use adjectives (such as outstanding, excellent, very good, good, etc) to describe a student and each code word is assigned to a percentile or quartile in the class.

For example, "Happy Rabbit is an outstanding student" means that I'm in the 90-100th percentile of my class, "good student" means i'm in the 10-33rd percentile, and "capable" means I'm in the bottom 10% of my class. This is an example from OSU.

Generally when students have the option, they prefer attending schools that don't have AOA, MSPE adjectives, tiered grading for preclerkships/clerkships, since it makes the environment of the school more collaborative and less about competing for the highest grades.

View attachment 385490
Thanks for the detailed response!
 
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Just released the new curriculums tab here. Will make a proper post tomorrow but tried to get this out quickly for the applicants making school decisions before the 15th.

**From MSAR '24-'25, NYU now shows 1-year preclinicals:**
The first stage of the curriculum is a one-year pre-clerkship period of instruction, with clerkships beginning at the start of the second year. While we integrate opportunities for career exploration throughout each medical school, year, this will be further honed in the post-clerkship year(s), with the opportunity to participate in advanced research, electives or selectives; ultimately, the NYUGSOM experience allows for the development of expertise in any desired area of interest.​
 
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Yeah fixed that a few hours ago try to refresh
Great! It's like a game of "Whack-a-Mole," isn't it? I'm amazed how few T25 schools are left that still have a 2-yr PC curriculum structure. I wonder how much (if at all) curricular innovation is playing into the USNWR ranking algorithm, since the most substantial changes really seem to be at the top tier, while the high, mid, and lower tier schools mostly continue the traditional approach (and the corresponding student cultures, which, according to the anecdotal reports, range from "supportive competitiveness" to a Hunger Games-like dystopia).
 
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Great! It's like a game of "Whack-a-Mole," isn't it? I'm amazed how few T25 schools are left that still have a 2-yr PC curriculum structure. I wonder how much (if at all) curricular innovation is playing into the USNWR ranking algorithm, since the most substantial changes really seem to be at the top tier, while the high, mid, and lower tier schools mostly continue the traditional approach (and the corresponding student cultures, which, according to the anecdotal reports, range from "supportive competitiveness" to a Hunger Games-like dystopia).
Yeah haha, I felt it was super important that curriculum information and grading was easily accessible.

What makes USNWR so widespread and actively used, despite how much it is "disliked", is that it's very easy to compare schools to each other. As humans, we like to compare anything and everything, especially when it comes to extremely emotional decisions like college/med/law/xyz applications that can very much define our future in one way or another.

The issue then becomes that the incentives of USNWR are completely misaligned with the best interest of students (and partially schools). You will find that almost all of the criteria used in ranking have nothing to do with the success of med students that come out of the program, or experience of the actual medical school!

1. Federal research grants
2. Research productivity of faculty
3. NIH research grants
4. NIH grants per faculty
5. Peer assessment score of the school
6. Residency PD scores of the school
7. MCAT/GPA/Acceptance Rate
8. Faculty-student ratio

How about curriculum info? Match results (match rate, specialties, programs, etc)? Quality of facilities? Access to hospitals for clerkships? Quality of education?

Rather than using criteria that matter, USNWR opts to force schools into the ranking rats race. Instead of focusing on student outcomes, we get to see which school can artificially inflate research grants as high as possible and squeeze MCAT medians to 523 :unsure:
 
How about curriculum info? Match results (match rate, specialties, programs, etc)? Quality of facilities? Access to hospitals for clerkships? Quality of education?

Rather than using criteria that matter, USNWR opts to force schools into the ranking rats race. Instead of focusing on student outcomes, we get to see which school can artificially inflate research grants as high as possible and squeeze MCAT medians to 523 :unsure:
Exactly. At least from the AMA and other articles I've read on this topic the past few years, the curriculum changes appear fairly widely viewed as improvements over the traditional structure. So, I suppose the top tier schools wanting to attract the high-stat students by promoting curricular innovation at least means those students are benefitting from the improvements (regardless of the reasons driving the changes). Would like to see that explored more widely for the many, many high quality med schools that are below the T30s.
 
Texas A&M is p/f PC and has a 1.5 yr PC! Clerkship grades are H/HP/P/F and it uses in house for the first semester and nbme for the remaining!
 
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Will be working over the next few days to manually correct and verify all the entries in the table again - one of the main issues was that information sent from the schools was more often than not incorrect (whether about internal ranking, lecture requirement, etc). Super grateful for all the med students who have sent me the right info so I can make corrections :)
 
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Do you know when admit will update with the new AMCAS data?
 
I know the matriculated is given with AMCAS, but how do you find out the overall accepted number? Trying to find out how many acceptances total the schools I got waitlisted give out
 
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I know the matriculated is given with AMCAS, but how do you find out the overall accepted number? Trying to find out how many acceptances total the schools I got waitlisted give out
It's a mix of the class profiles released by schools, the old 2022 sheet for schools that pulled out of USNWR, and then the most recent USNWR accepted values.
 
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Yeah haha, I felt it was super important that curriculum information and grading was easily accessible.

What makes USNWR so widespread and actively used, despite how much it is "disliked", is that it's very easy to compare schools to each other. As humans, we like to compare anything and everything, especially when it comes to extremely emotional decisions like college/med/law/xyz applications that can very much define our future in one way or another.

The issue then becomes that the incentives of USNWR are completely misaligned with the best interest of students (and partially schools). You will find that almost all of the criteria used in ranking have nothing to do with the success of med students that come out of the program, or experience of the actual medical school!

1. Federal research grants
2. Research productivity of faculty
3. NIH research grants
4. NIH grants per faculty
5. Peer assessment score of the school
6. Residency PD scores of the school
7. MCAT/GPA/Acceptance Rate
8. Faculty-student ratio

How about curriculum info? Match results (match rate, specialties, programs, etc)? Quality of facilities? Access to hospitals for clerkships? Quality of education?

Rather than using criteria that matter, USNWR opts to force schools into the ranking rats race. Instead of focusing on student outcomes, we get to see which school can artificially inflate research grants as high as possible and squeeze MCAT medians to 523 :unsure:
Hey. Just saying. Your link didn't work for me. Any ideas?
 
Texas A&M is p/f PC and has a 1.5 yr PC! Clerkship grades are H/HP/P/F and it uses in house for the first semester and nbme for the remaining!
From current students & what I noted down from interview day, I think it's in-house + NBME throughout. It's just that students usually study strictly in-house for the first semester and then most use boards from there on, even tho there still are in-house assessments
 
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I just released Admit Profiles, a new feature where applicants can see successful students' entire profiles (essays, activities, etc). I'm hoping that it serves three purposes:

1) Increases the transparency in admissions where applicants have examples of profiles that did or didn't work at each stage of the cycle.

2) Provides a competitive alternative to consulting firms that charge applicants $5,000 to $15,000 for edits of secondary essays or similar services (not accessible to 99% of applicants).

3) Make the site sustainable and hopefully offset some of the expenses that go into building the site and all of the free resources. It's incredibly expensive and I've been working full-time as a software engineer while building Admit to pay for everything. With med school coming up I won't have the luxury of doing that without draining the rest of my savings.

I've had a lot of awesome feedback over the last few months and really appreciate all of the DMs I've gotten from upcoming applicants who found the free resources helpful.

To date, there have been just over 30,000 school lists made by you all which is insane and I hope gave a lot of applicants a look into what's needed to get into med school, and more importantly, realize that a career in medicine is possible. A lot of the messages I got were from low-income applicants who were worried they weren't competitive enough for any school, only to find out that even T20s were within range based on their profile!

I'm now working on more free tools similar to the school list builder and will share more info soon. If you can't afford to pay for access to the profiles, please just DM me and I'll give you access for free. I want Admit to continue being a resource that low-income students find helpful; I got so many messages from others asking how to donate and help fund the project but I figured I could release a cool feature instead with the option to pay or not.
 
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UMiami actually has in-house exams! They’re “in NBME style” but made by the profs and they only have a few true NBME exams throughout PC. I found this out from a current UM student who corrected me lol!
 
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