lnh

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nafcillin

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they look awful and I can't imagine micro-managing my own prescription. count me out! (although it's an innovative concept)

wait, I have no idea what a progressive is or what presbyope means. I doubt this is targeting my population. Could someone explain?
 
Dec 5, 2009
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I'm surprised to actually see these mentioned anywhere. The office I work at has a display and we would dispense them if anyone ever bought a pair. The whole time I have worked there not a single pair has been sold and I believe there have been a total of possibly two people who have shown remote interest in them. They immediately said they would have to think about it and promptly left the office after receiving the price quote. I believe the Trufocals run above $800 a pair but I'm not absolutely sure as I've never sold a pair.

Nafcillin, progressives are glasses that can be used to see distance, intermediate, and near for those individuals that need reading glasses and glasses to see distance. Like bifocals, they have a region for reading usually at the bottom of the lenses and an upper region for reading except unlike bifocals there is no line and generally others cannot tell one is wearing progressives.

Presbyopia is the condition where an individual loses the ability to focus on near objects as a normal part of aging. So Presbyope just refers to an individual with this condition.

As I have not yet begun my Optometric education please do take my definitions with a grain of salt. If there are any ODs that can confirm my definitions or better explain these terms please do comment!
 
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May 7, 2010
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As a 4th year OD student, I explain it to my patients like this.

Presbyopia happens as we age. When our eyes look at something in the distance they focus on that object. When we look at something up close, it takes a lot more focusing ability for our eyes to make that near object clear because it is closer to us. As we age, the muscle in the eye responsible for focusing loses its ability to work making it harder to see things up close clearly.

Progressive lenses are a form of multifocal lenses. Whereas traditional bi/trifocal lenses have clear demarcated areas of viewing, progressive lenses start at the top for your distance vision and as you move your eye straight down, the power in the lens progressively lets you focus on objects closer to you. Hence the name, progressives. They are also referred to as no-line bifocals, though they aren't the only type of lens in that category.
 

odieoh

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As a 4th year OD student, I explain it to my patients like this.

Presbyopia happens as we age. When our eyes look at something in the distance they focus on that object. When we look at something up close, it takes a lot more focusing ability for our eyes to make that near object clear because it is closer to us. As we age, the muscle in the eye responsible for focusing loses its ability to work making it harder to see things up close clearly.

Progressive lenses are a form of multifocal lenses. Whereas traditional bi/trifocal lenses have clear demarcated areas of viewing, progressive lenses start at the top for your distance vision and as you move your eye straight down, the power in the lens progressively lets you focus on objects closer to you. Hence the name, progressives. They are also referred to as no-line bifocals, though they aren't the only type of lens in that category.
Have you had anyone keel over from pure information overload/boredom? I know I almost did. . .
 
May 7, 2010
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nope not yet. typically when my patients ask me a question, they want to know an answer. and that is what i give them. i'll let you know when that happens though.
 

odieoh

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nope not yet. typically when my patients ask me a question, they want to know an answer. and that is what i give them. i'll let you know when that happens though.
Yes, I understand and its nice that you are educating you patients and so on. It's just that your answer reads like something you might find in some government technical manual describing the pros and cons of various bifocals.
 
May 7, 2010
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Yes, I understand and its nice that you are educating you patients and so on. It's just that your answer reads like something you might find in some government technical manual describing the pros and cons of various bifocals.
well i'll let you educate your patients your way, and i'll educate my patients my way. i have countless patients thank me repeatedly for speaking to them in a way they could understand. i'm not saying my way is better than yours, its just the way i do things. i'm sure you educate your patients thoroughly as well (no sarcasm intended.)
 

odieoh

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well i'll let you educate your patients your way, and i'll educate my patients my way. i have countless patients thank me repeatedly for speaking to them in a way they could understand. i'm not saying my way is better than yours, its just the way i do things. i'm sure you educate your patients thoroughly as well (no sarcasm intended.)
Hey sorry about the snarky comment yesterday. Patients really are appreciative of having things explained to them. Sometimes its frustrating however how very little sinks in for some patients, even when explaining simple things. . . such as "After your cataract surgery you WILL MOST ABSOLUTELY DEFINITELY need reading glasses!! Things will be blurry up close!!" repeated 5 times and requiring them to sign an affadavit stating they understand they will need reading glasses after cataract surgery. Post op week 1? "I cant see up close!!! WTF??" sigh.

I'm overdramatizing of course but it really can be frustrating and I do find that the shortes simplest explanations are the best. But regardless, like you said we all have our own way. Best of luck.:love:
 
May 7, 2010
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Hey sorry about the snarky comment yesterday. Patients really are appreciative of having things explained to them. Sometimes its frustrating however how very little sinks in for some patients, even when explaining simple things. . . such as "After your cataract surgery you WILL MOST ABSOLUTELY DEFINITELY need reading glasses!! Things will be blurry up close!!" repeated 5 times and requiring them to sign an affadavit stating they understand they will need reading glasses after cataract surgery. Post op week 1? "I cant see up close!!! WTF??" sigh.

I'm overdramatizing of course but it really can be frustrating and I do find that the shortes simplest explanations are the best. But regardless, like you said we all have our own way. Best of luck.:love:
lol, i love how you used that example of needing glasses after cataract surgery. i've explained that numerous times and people still get angry. and don't worry about yesterday. i don't care how people explain things to patients, i don't care if they are an OD or an MD, i just want patients to become more educated about their eye care and for eye care practitioners (whichever degree they may hold) to give them nothing but the absolute best care possible.

good luck in your medical endeavours as well.