Research

Discussion in 'hSDN' started by gabeybaby, Dec 25, 2008.

  1. gabeybaby

    gabeybaby ♥♠☻
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    I'm currently a senior in hs, just thinking ahead. I realize that one of the credentials for Med School is research experience. I'm not sure how or where I can participate in one (when I go to college). Any suggestions or tips would be nice.
    Thank you :)
     
  2. shishka32

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    Just talk with some professors once you get there and try to get some connections going. Nothing to really worry about now - just get in and ask around once you get to undergrad!
     
  3. QofQuimica

    QofQuimica Seriously, dude, I think you're overreacting....
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    Research is *not* required for most med schools, unless you plan to apply to MD/PhD programs or five year research-MD programs. That being said, it is a good experience in its own right, and you may find that you really like it. There are basically two common options: talk to one of your profs or grad student TAs about working in their lab as ziggy suggested, or go through a formal research program geared toward college students (often done during the summers). Your college career center should be able to help you find research programs that fit your interests and qualifications. Best of luck. :)
     
  4. URHere

    Physician PhD 10+ Year Member

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    The thing I found easiest when lab hunting, was to go to the website of whichever department I wanted to work with and then to browse the professors' research profiles. Once I found a few people doing work that sounded interesting to me, I shot off a few emails introducing myself, explaining that I was looking for a research lab, and asking if I could get together with them to talk about their research.

    Most of the professors I spoke to were more than interested in discussing their work with me - and they were thrilled to take on a student as long as they didn't have to pay. If you want a paid position, it is usually easier to look for a lab position through the university career center or via job postings online. Just keep in mind that some positions that will pay you require you to already have an undergraduate degree, and the ones you would be qualified for are generally very bland work (doing dishes, making solutions, etc).
     
  5. GZA

    GZA Marcel who?
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    Agree with URHere, where I went to UG, that was how things happened. Browse web pages of prospective labs then send emails. Don't be dissapointed if only 10% or so respond, so dont be too thrifty.
     

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