Apoplexy__

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There's a local residency program in the field I'm interested in that I'm doing research at. Things are going great, I'm working with the residents, getting a couple contacts, everything's peachy.

I decide to shoot their education department an e-mail asking a couple questions about their residency. The residency PD, whom I've never met, replies back and is very kind over e-mail. We set an appointment for me to give him a call (not an in-person meeting).

Somehow, I miss the appointment. Missed a reminder I set for it, too. 5 days after the appointment, I realize this, and e-mail the secretary apologizing. I tell her that I appreciate their time but don't need to bother them for a re-schedule.

I'm hoping to wait this out and hope the PD and secretary forget about me, since I have a good 6-8 months before I'd even apply for an audition rotation there. The e-mail I used had my full name, but I only used my first name in the e-mails. Here's what I'd love from you guys experienced with anything like this:

-Am I ok? I'd really love to have this program on the table for me...
-When I get in touch again, should I not talk about it at all, or should I address it somehow?
-Any similar stories/anecdotes?
 

evilbooyaa

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You missed a phone call with a PD in the residency program that you're doing reserach in (and thus obviously want to go to?)

Clearly you aren't matching.
















No, JK, it's likely not that big of a deal. As soon as I realized that I wiffed on the meeting (if I were you), I would've e-mailed the secretary and asked if there was any other time the PD was free (not for him to block off some time away from his daily activities for you) so that you and him/her could talk.

That being said, I highly doubt the PD is going to just forget about this down the line. I'd recommend you somehow talk to him and just fess up to your stupidity or make up an excuse as to why you couldn't call at that time.
 
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Apoplexy__

Apoplexy__

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No, JK, it's likely not that big of a deal. As soon as I realized that I wiffed on the meeting (if I were you), I would've e-mailed the secretary and asked if there was any other time the PD was free (not for him to block off some time away from his daily activities for you) so that you and him/her could talk.

That being said, I highly doubt the PD is going to just forget about this down the line. I'd recommend you somehow talk to him and just fess up to your stupidity or make up an excuse as to why you couldn't call at that time.
Ha, yeah ok. Good to know that you think he'll remember. I don't NEED to talk to him, so I'll probably just go about things as normal and if I run into him or have to interact with him at some point I'll address it.

Thanks for your input.
 
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I wouldn't worry about it too much. It seems like you'd still probably have a good chance with this residency. On a side note, how do you have time to do research during rotations??
 
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Apoplexy__

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I wouldn't worry about it too much. It seems like you'd still probably have a good chance with this residency. On a side note, how do you have time to do research during rotations??
It's just another stressor in your life, but doable. Most of my work with them has been remote involving patient data analysis, and has been very flexible. I also happened to have an elective rotation that was ridiculously easy (~20 hours/week) and provided me significant time to study and research for that month. Since that easy rotation, I've only put in 1-2 hours/week on average for a few months. Slow and steady, basically.
 
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inmyslumber

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There's a local residency program in the field I'm interested in that I'm doing research at. Things are going great, I'm working with the residents, getting a couple contacts, everything's peachy.

I decide to shoot their education department an e-mail asking a couple questions about their residency. The residency PD, whom I've never met, replies back and is very kind over e-mail. We set an appointment for me to give him a call (not an in-person meeting).

Somehow, I miss the appointment. Missed a reminder I set for it, too. 5 days after the appointment, I realize this, and e-mail the secretary apologizing. I tell her that I appreciate their time but don't need to bother them for a re-schedule.

I'm hoping to wait this out and hope the PD and secretary forget about me, since I have a good 6-8 months before I'd even apply for an audition rotation there. The e-mail I used had my full name, but I only used my first name in the e-mails. Here's what I'd love from you guys experienced with anything like this:

-Am I ok? I'd really love to have this program on the table for me...
-When I get in touch again, should I not talk about it at all, or should I address it somehow?
-Any similar stories/anecdotes?
To give another opinion, this inability to keep a meeting in addition to not apologizing directly to the PD shows something about your respect for the PD's time and your ability to organize your schedule. In-person vs phone does not matter if the person has set aside time for you.

I have had a few medical students miss a meeting with me (I am not a PD by the way). Once is forgiven (and an apology is appreciated). If a missed-meeting happens twice, this is not someone I want to spend much time helping. Just something to consider. In-person vs phone does not matter if the person has set aside time for you.
 
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Apoplexy__

Apoplexy__

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To give another opinion, this inability to keep a meeting in addition to not apologizing directly to the PD shows something about your respect for the PD's time and your ability to organize your schedule. In-person vs phone does not matter if the person has set aside time for you.

I have had a few medical students miss a meeting with me (I am not a PD by the way). Once is forgiven (and an apology is appreciated). If a missed-meeting happens twice, this is not someone I want to spend much time helping. Just something to consider. In-person vs phone does not matter if the person has set aside time for you.
Thanks for weighing in.
 

SouthernSurgeon

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To give another opinion, this inability to keep a meeting in addition to not apologizing directly to the PD shows something about your respect for the PD's time and your ability to organize your schedule.
I was actually about to chime in with something similar to this...I was surprised that no one else had said this.

IMO the bigger failure here is not to address this directly with the PD. I think given you posted this nearly a week ago the damage may already be done, but still better late than never.
 
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Apoplexy__

Apoplexy__

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I was actually about to chime in with something similar to this...I was surprised that no one else had said this.

IMO the bigger failure here is not to address this directly with the PD. I think given you posted this nearly a week ago the damage may already be done, but still better late than never.
It may have been my naivete, but I felt that the fact that almost all the communication was done through the secretary (save for one e-mail from him confirming he was up for it) meant that I should not waste his time more by e-mailing him directly. Trying to preserve the chain-of-command, too. But I definitely see your point.

The actual incident was several months ago now -- I've been basically obsessively thinking about it since. I can't remember any other time I've done something like this, honestly. I think it would be more embarrassing than anything to contact him at this point, right?
 

SouthernSurgeon

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It may have been my naivete, but I felt that the fact that almost all the communication was done through the secretary (save for one e-mail from him confirming he was up for it) meant that I should not waste his time more by e-mailing him directly. Trying to preserve the chain-of-command, too. But I definitely see your point.

The actual incident was several months ago now -- I've been basically obsessively thinking about it since. I can't remember any other time I've done something like this, honestly. I think it would be more embarrassing than anything to contact him at this point, right?
Months later, yes, I would say contacting now is just embarrassing. But you should have contacted him at the time.