i want out

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My resignation from active duty as well as my resignation of commission is in the chop chain.

We will just have to see what they tell me to change...

So far, only advice, is that they don't really want to hear the truth on these things.

I am having to resign via e-mail since I am in the middle east, on my second deployment as a GMO to this AOR.

i want out

I suppose I should mention that I am a second tour Navy GMO that can't wait to get out.

Plan on doing anesthesia, but the goal right now is just to get out even if I have to sit out a year and wait to get in a program. I would even consider doing another internship before staying on as a GMO.
 

AF M4

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So what is the process for leaving? How many people have to approve your resignation, is it a certainty that you will get out and when will you know?
 

Galo

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Do you have active duty time left??

I can tell you by the time 4 years of active duty came around, I was so fed up that I looked into all options. You have the legal right to write a letter of resignation, and give them a 6 month departure time. The letter has to go through your commander, the base commander, the MAJCOM, commander, and finally to the Secretary of the respective service. At all points of contact it can be marked disapproved, and although I think it has to go all the way to the top, if anyone along the way disapproves it, its unlikely to be approved by anyone else.

I eventually wrote an 11 page letter outlining all the CRAP I had been through including my observations, problems with medicine, retention, etc etc. By the time I got to my new base, I had scrapped sending this, but eventually my jaywalking past caught up to me, and a similar document made its way to the SecAF, and I was honorably discharged.

Its next to impossible if you have active duty time left. Its anyone's legal right to do it, especially if you have documented extensively attempts that you have made at getting your situation better. Its a way to put people on notice. Do not forget there is also a way to file a formal complaint against your commander, as well as writting up a Fraud waste and abuse complaint. All of them generally end up agreeing with the person of higher rank, but they do create the favorite weapon of petty ignorant commanders have against you, the paper trail.

If you are getting out in time, you let them know 6 months in advance, and make sure you resign your commision.
 

AF M4

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So I'm a 3 year HPSP. I do an intern year, 3 years as a flight surgeon and then I have 4 years' IRR as I understand it. So you send the letter in during the last part of the 3rd year as a flight surgeon?
 

chopper

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AF M4 said:
So I'm a 3 year HPSP. I do an intern year, 3 years as a flight surgeon and then I have 4 years' IRR as I understand it. So you send the letter in during the last part of the 3rd year as a flight surgeon?
I'm not sure if it is the same as in the Navy, but we put ours in about a year out from our separation date. As I remember it, it was 9-12 months out. It does take a while for it to make it through the system.
 
OP
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i want out

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chopper said:
I'm not sure if it is the same as in the Navy, but we put ours in about a year out from our separation date. As I remember it, it was 9-12 months out. It does take a while for it to make it through the system.

Yes, the window for submitting a letter of resignation is 9-12 months from intended seperation, like everything else in the Navy, there is an instruction which is only minimally useful in actually writing this thing.

Also a good idea if there is any doubt about your intentions in your chain of command to make sure they expect to see the letter.

As I recall, they officially have 10 days to respond once you submit it, but as we know those official time periods mean absolutely nothing, unless they intend to use it against you.

As with everything, this all depends on "needs of the Navy" so I am hoping that they will let me out before they realize how piss poor the recruiting for HPSP has become in the Navy.

I Saw an article in the Navy Times about the rate of scholarships given out, they mentioned that Navy gave out about 50% of the ones they had available, but the Air Force gave out 115%. I am going to give you Air Force folks one guess where that extra 15% is going to go...

I seriously doubt that they will use it to actually offer better care, so Anchors Aweigh AF.

i want out
 

orbitsurgMD

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i want out said:
Yes, the window for submitting a letter of resignation is 9-12 months from intended seperation, like everything else in the Navy, there is an instruction which is only minimally useful in actually writing this thing.

Also a good idea if there is any doubt about your intentions in your chain of command to make sure they expect to see the letter.

As I recall, they officially have 10 days to respond once you submit it, but as we know those official time periods mean absolutely nothing, unless they intend to use it against you.

As with everything, this all depends on "needs of the Navy" so I am hoping that they will let me out before they realize how piss poor the recruiting for HPSP has become in the Navy.

I Saw an article in the Navy Times about the rate of scholarships given out, they mentioned that Navy gave out about 50% of the ones they had available, but the Air Force gave out 115%. I am going to give you Air Force folks one guess where that extra 15% is going to go...

I seriously doubt that they will use it to actually offer better care, so Anchors Aweigh AF.

i want out
You are naval reserve, not augmented regular Navy, correct?

I doubt you will have any problems. As I recall, the letter is simply a formality
but it is necessary to get you into the out-processing administrative machinery, some of which will be useless to you unless you have enough years to retire with pension. You should have no difficulty leaving by your EAOS date as far as active duty goes. Resigning your commission may be another matter. They might decline to approve that, instead turning you over to the reserve command in New Orleans (or wherever they are doing that now after Katrina) as an IRR non-drilling reservist. You might be campaigned to get you to stay on active duty until you start residency, but I gather from your tag that isn't what you would want. Bottom line, they can't make you stay beyond your contract unless you are stop-lossed, and that still wouldn't prevent your filing a claim against them for monetary losses resulting from involuntary extension in absence of a general draft. (No bills of attainder, that constitutional thing)