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Rude to ask for LOR draft?

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JustinG

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To me it seems like you don't trust your prof, but in my case, what if a prof doesn't have the best English, and may rub the adcoms the wrong way.
Is it rude to ask your prof to see a draft before submission, or is this very common?

Thanks.
 

dw2158

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usually you have to sign something waiving your rights to read your LORs. at least, it was highly encouraged that we did (by our pre-med advisors) because if you've waived your rights, adcoms reading the letters are more likely to think they're being super honest about you. :shrug:

so... people don't often get to read their letters. and to my knowledge people don't often ask for them either (although i guess you're technically allowed to ask; you just can't demand)
 

JustinG

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Wow... I thought you just had to ask for a letter, and then tell the prof where to submit it when they're done.?
 

apumic

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Wow... I thought you just had to ask for a letter, and then tell the prof where to submit it when they're done.?

That is all you have to do but you typically also waive your right to see the letters. This is actually quite important. I know I wouldn't trust a letter of rec that the applicant was able to see since the writer isn't likely to give a fair assessment if there is the possibility of offending the applicant. From my experience talking to references on the phone and receiving reference letters and forms, it is often hard enough to read between the lines and distinguish a "truly great" applicant from a "decent but I have my unspoken reservations and will only say good things" applicant. Not signing your waiver is definitely a red flag to read more between the lines!
 

willen101383

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Some schools do require that signed form stating you waive your right. I think its tacky as hell to ask to see the letter. Many top notch foreign professors likely have less than perfect english....and I am sure adcoms are used to it.
 

RevMD

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Ok. Points taken. Thank you.

As mentioned above, you will have to sign a confidentiality waiver when you submit the LOR form to your professor. However, if you know the prof really well and they have high regards for you, they likely will be kind enough to ask whether you would like to read their letter. Only accept if they ask you, otherwise you are just going to have to take it on faith that the writer is going to speak highly of you. Usually, they may also ask you whether there is anything specific you would like to have included in the letter, take this opportunity to point out your concerns.
 
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