Rules of thumb (Please contribute)

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.
2

202781


Members don't see this ad.
The SND Rules of Thumb

1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2.An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3.
 

Twiigg

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2007
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
0
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4.
 

Twiigg

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2007
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
0
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5.
 

AFDOCtobe

New Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2008
Messages
8
Reaction score
1
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
 

aebvd97

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
361
Reaction score
0
4. Club membership=crummy EC

I'm really confused by this post. I do not believe at all that only shadowing and volunteering are viewed as valuable. I'm Pres. of my university's running club, and every interviewer has commented that that was interesting and continued to talk about my running habits. So, I definitely disagree with this statement.
 

aznb0y129

Oh hamburgers!
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Messages
4,777
Reaction score
2
I'm really confused by this post. I do not believe at all that only shadowing and volunteering are viewed as valuable. I'm Pres. of my university's running club, and every interviewer has commented that that was interesting and continued to talk about my running habits. So, I definitely disagree with this statement.

I think being the president of a running club is much more significant than being a member of the Milk & Cookies club (an actual thing at my undergrad). That's probably what he meant.
 

Twiigg

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2007
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
0
I'm really confused by this post. I do not believe at all that only shadowing and volunteering are viewed as valuable. I'm Pres. of my university's running club, and every interviewer has commented that that was interesting and continued to talk about my running habits. So, I definitely disagree with this statement.

membership =/= president
 

aebvd97

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
361
Reaction score
0
membership =/= president

Regardless, I disagree with your statement. People need to diversify themselves. If that means joining the mountain climbing club, fine. Many people applying to med school seem to be robots; they have x amount of time int he ER, x hours volunteering at their local children's hospital.

No, you don't want to list every random group you may have been affiliated, but you shouldn't suggest that clubs aren't quality ECs. For every "milk and cook club" there are likely 10 other legit ones.
 

Twiigg

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2007
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
0
Regardless, I disagree with your statement. People need to diversify themselves. If that means joining the mountain climbing club, fine. Many people applying to med school seem to be robots; they have x amount of time int he ER, x hours volunteering at their local children's hospital.

No, you don't want to list every random group you may have been affiliated, but you shouldn't suggest that clubs aren't quality ECs. For every "milk and cook club" there are likely 10 other legit ones.

Okay, now this I disagree with. Regardless, if I'm filling in the works/activities portion of the application, I'm not going to list an activity as "Running Club" member. Maybe I will list that one of my hobbies is running, and then explain competitions in which I've participated, running groups I'm associated with (like a school club), etc.

Generally, club membership is a crummy E.C. I'm sticking behind that statement. A lot of adcoms just see it as fluff. Anyone can go out and sign up for 5 really unique clubs (i.e., fencing, Russian, Star Wars, running, etc.), but it's not going to help them much in the application process.
 

goldenwest

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2008
Messages
1,205
Reaction score
3
Regardless, I disagree with your statement. People need to diversify themselves. If that means joining the mountain climbing club, fine. Many people applying to med school seem to be robots; they have x amount of time int he ER, x hours volunteering at their local children's hospital.

No, you don't want to list every random group you may have been affiliated, but you shouldn't suggest that clubs aren't quality ECs. For every "milk and cook club" there are likely 10 other legit ones.

Alpha Beta Kai Gamma Omega Phi!!!!!!!!

greek-sorority.jpg
 

engineeredout

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
May 11, 2008
Messages
3,451
Reaction score
625
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
 

aznb0y129

Oh hamburgers!
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Messages
4,777
Reaction score
2
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
 

magikdoc

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
May 17, 2008
Messages
104
Reaction score
2
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
 
Members don't see this ad :)

Ebola Virus

Full Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2007
Messages
415
Reaction score
0
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
 

Twiigg

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2007
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
0
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13.
 

Fiko18

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Sep 18, 2008
Messages
180
Reaction score
0
im gona have to respectfully disagree with 12, i was not a double major but if u dual major in 4 years that has to be impressive
 
2

216397

1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
 

Twiigg

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2007
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
0
im gona have to respectfully disagree with 12, i was not a double major but if u dual major in 4 years that has to be impressive

False assumption. Good conversation, though, I'm sure.
 

chiz2kul

t.roll.ed for Banning
10+ Year Member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
848
Reaction score
2
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
 

Jtrenier

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2008
Messages
86
Reaction score
1
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
 

copingmethods

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2006
Messages
807
Reaction score
1
Somewhat disagree w/ #6. Not that you have to go to an ivy, but undergrad name does have some value.

For example, UMich's director of admissions has explicitly said that only people who went to certain (high-ranked) schools qualify for getting an automatic interview invite.
 

notaboutthebike

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2008
Messages
35
Reaction score
0
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19.
 

Chemist0157

Full Member
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2007
Messages
7,831
Reaction score
3,621
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20.
 
Members don't see this ad :)

aznb0y129

Oh hamburgers!
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Messages
4,777
Reaction score
2
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20. Did I mention apply early?
21.
 

Loon

Clawed to bits
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2007
Messages
336
Reaction score
2
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20. Did I mention apply early?
21. Note that 5, 14 and 20 apply doubly to secondaries.
22.
 

ButImLETired

Prodigal member
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
May 27, 2008
Messages
3,280
Reaction score
82
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20. Did I mention apply early?
21. Note that 5, 14 and 20 apply doubly to secondaries.
22. Everyone knows someone with a 40/4.0 who didn't get in anywhere and someone with a 3.0/30 who got into his top choice. It doesn't mean anything. Just do your best.
23. Spam filters are your worst enemies.
24.
 

gujuDoc

Full Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2004
Messages
13,864
Reaction score
39
I'm really confused by this post. I do not believe at all that only shadowing and volunteering are viewed as valuable. I'm Pres. of my university's running club, and every interviewer has commented that that was interesting and continued to talk about my running habits. So, I definitely disagree with this statement.

I'd revise number 4 to say Organizations are worthless if you don't do much in them. So if you are joining, best be active and show something for it.
 

aznb0y129

Oh hamburgers!
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Messages
4,777
Reaction score
2
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20. Did I mention apply early?
21. Note that 5, 14 and 20 apply doubly to secondaries.
22. Everyone knows someone with a 40/4.0 who didn't get in anywhere and someone with a 3.0/30 who got into his top choice. It doesn't mean anything. Just do your best.
23. Spam filters are your worst enemies.
24. Re: #22, that being said, apply broadly and reasonably. It's ok to have a couple dream schools, but don't make your entire list top-heavy.
 

Chicago Person

I'll miss you, AMCAS
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2008
Messages
96
Reaction score
0
Twiigg said:
False assumption. Good conversation, though, I'm sure.

Twigg, I'd like to hear your reasoning for believing that a double major is useless. Not trying to argue, just want to hear your insight.
 

Chicago Person

I'll miss you, AMCAS
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2008
Messages
96
Reaction score
0
Twiigg said:
False assumption. Good conversation, though, I'm sure.

Twiigg, I'd like to hear your reasoning for believing that a double major is useless. Not trying to argue, just want to hear your insight.
 

Twiigg

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2007
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
0
Twiigg, I'd like to hear your reasoning for believing that a double major is useless. Not trying to argue, just want to hear your insight.

Well, I didn't say it was useless. I mean, a double major could definitely open up a wide variety of other career paths and could greatly benefit you as an individual, but admissions committees aren't going to accept you because they see you double majored. I just know it's not a big deal in the eyes of admissions committees to have double majored.
 
Members don't see this ad :)

Loon

Clawed to bits
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2007
Messages
336
Reaction score
2
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20. Did I mention apply early?
21. Note that 5, 14 and 20 apply doubly to secondaries.
22. Everyone knows someone with a 40/4.0 who didn't get in anywhere and someone with a 3.0/30 who got into his top choice. It doesn't mean anything. Just do your best.
23. Spam filters are your worst enemies.
24. Re: #22, that being said, apply broadly and reasonably. It's ok to have a couple dream schools, but don't make your entire list top-heavy.
25. If you have any worries about your competitiveness or intend to apply to a broad range of schools (and you should), in addition to 11 you should also get a letter from a humanities professor.
 

Fakesmile

Full Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2008
Messages
444
Reaction score
0
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)

Then a 3.7 with a "C" will be detrimental if you want to go into top programs? :(
 

biophysicianai

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2008
Messages
238
Reaction score
4
im gona have to respectfully disagree with 12, i was not a double major but if u dual major in 4 years that has to be impressive

what about double majoring in 3.5 years and doing a semester abroad :D

Then a 3.7 with a "C" will be detrimental if you want to go into top programs? :(

i feel ya on that one, though :(
 

pianola

MS2
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 23, 2008
Messages
6,067
Reaction score
17
Well, I didn't say it was useless. I mean, a double major could definitely open up a wide variety of other career paths and could greatly benefit you as an individual, but admissions committees aren't going to accept you because they see you double majored. I just know it's not a big deal in the eyes of admissions committees to have double majored.

Well no one's going to accept you just because you have a 4.0 either.

Or just because you have a 43R MCAT.

...again, it depends on what you double-majored in.
 

majestic red

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2008
Messages
247
Reaction score
46
Then a 3.7 with a "C" will be detrimental if you want to go into top programs? :(

I feel like it would probably depend on what you got the C in. If it's in a prereq, it'll probably have a bigger impact than if it was in some random class you took.
 

DocWalken

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2007
Messages
356
Reaction score
0
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20. Did I mention apply early?
21. Note that 5, 14 and 20 apply doubly to secondaries.
22. Everyone knows someone with a 40/4.0 who didn't get in anywhere and someone with a 3.0/30 who got into his top choice. It doesn't mean anything. Just do your best.
23. Spam filters are your worst enemies.
24. Re: #22, that being said, apply broadly and reasonably. It's ok to have a couple dream schools, but don't make your entire list top-heavy.
25. If you have any worries about your competitiveness or intend to apply to a broad range of schools (and you should), in addition to 11 you should also get a letter from a humanities professor.

26. Take everything you read on this website with a grain of salt, though it can be useful.
27. Numbers are the most important part of your application.
 

lainapox

A little crazypants
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
435
Reaction score
1
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20. Did I mention apply early?
21. Note that 5, 14 and 20 apply doubly to secondaries.
22. Everyone knows someone with a 40/4.0 who didn't get in anywhere and someone with a 3.0/30 who got into his top choice. It doesn't mean anything. Just do your best.
23. Spam filters are your worst enemies.
24. Re: #22, that being said, apply broadly and reasonably. It's ok to have a couple dream schools, but don't make your entire list top-heavy.
25. If you have any worries about your competitiveness or intend to apply to a broad range of schools (and you should), in addition to 11 you should also get a letter from a humanities professor.

26. Take everything you read on this website with a grain of salt, though it can be useful.
27. Numbers are the most important part of your application.
28. They want real-people doctors, not just the best resume in their stack. And hey, guess what! You're a real person! Show your humanity, your genuine interest, WHY you're passionate about medicine, and show them that, given the chance, you'll do wonderful and impressive things. You'll be fine. Really.
29. Seriously. You'll be fine. Calm the eff down.
 

Chemist0157

Full Member
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2007
Messages
7,831
Reaction score
3,621
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20. Did I mention apply early?
21. Note that 5, 14 and 20 apply doubly to secondaries.
22. Everyone knows someone with a 40/4.0 who didn't get in anywhere and someone with a 3.0/30 who got into his top choice. It doesn't mean anything. Just do your best.
23. Spam filters are your worst enemies.
24. Re: #22, that being said, apply broadly and reasonably. It's ok to have a couple dream schools, but don't make your entire list top-heavy.
25. If you have any worries about your competitiveness or intend to apply to a broad range of schools (and you should), in addition to 11 you should also get a letter from a humanities professor.

26. Take everything you read on this website with a grain of salt, though it can be useful.
27. Numbers are the most important part of your application.
28. They want real-people doctors, not just the best resume in their stack. And hey, guess what! You're a real person! Show your humanity, your genuine interest, WHY you're passionate about medicine, and show them that, given the chance, you'll do wonderful and impressive things. You'll be fine. Really.
29. Seriously. You'll be fine. Calm the eff down.
30. Be patient. There are 1,000,000 (estimation) applicants just like you waiting for their secondary/interview invite/decision letter too.

And el oh el at #29. So true.
 
2

202781

1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20. Did I mention apply early?
21. Note that 5, 14 and 20 apply doubly to secondaries.
22. Everyone knows someone with a 40/4.0 who didn't get in anywhere and someone with a 3.0/30 who got into his top choice. It doesn't mean anything. Just do your best.
23. Spam filters are your worst enemies.
24. Re: #22, that being said, apply broadly and reasonably. It's ok to have a couple dream schools, but don't make your entire list top-heavy.
25. If you have any worries about your competitiveness or intend to apply to a broad range of schools (and you should), in addition to 11 you should also get a letter from a humanities professor.

26. Take everything you read on this website with a grain of salt, though it can be useful.
27. Numbers are the most important part of your application.
28. They want real-people doctors, not just the best resume in their stack. And hey, guess what! You're a real person! Show your humanity, your genuine interest, WHY you're passionate about medicine, and show them that, given the chance, you'll do wonderful and impressive things. You'll be fine. Really.
29. Seriously. You'll be fine. Calm the eff down.
30. Be patient. There are 1,000,000 (estimation) applicants just like you waiting for their secondary/interview invite/decision letter too.
31. Your case is NOT unique.
32. People on SDN do NOT represent the "normal" application pool
33. If you have a 32/3.7+ and someone says you are not very competitive at mid-tier schools then you are likely on SDN.
 

ButImLETired

Prodigal member
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
May 27, 2008
Messages
3,280
Reaction score
82
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20. Did I mention apply early?
21. Note that 5, 14 and 20 apply doubly to secondaries.
22. Everyone knows someone with a 40/4.0 who didn't get in anywhere and someone with a 3.0/30 who got into his top choice. It doesn't mean anything. Just do your best.
23. Spam filters are your worst enemies.
24. Re: #22, that being said, apply broadly and reasonably. It's ok to have a couple dream schools, but don't make your entire list top-heavy.
25. If you have any worries about your competitiveness or intend to apply to a broad range of schools (and you should), in addition to 11 you should also get a letter from a humanities professor.
26. Take everything you read on this website with a grain of salt, though it can be useful.
27. Numbers are the most important part of your application.
28. They want real-people doctors, not just the best resume in their stack. And hey, guess what! You're a real person! Show your humanity, your genuine interest, WHY you're passionate about medicine, and show them that, given the chance, you'll do wonderful and impressive things. You'll be fine. Really.
29. Seriously. You'll be fine. Calm the eff down.
30. Be patient. There are 1,000,000 (estimation) applicants just like you waiting for their secondary/interview invite/decision letter too.
31. You're not "too good" for any school. You're not "entitled" to a top-10. Get over yourself. Any acceptance is a blessing, and more than 60% of applicants can hope for.
32. Rankings are basically useless unless you're going into academia (and even then, they're arguable). USNews = the devil.
33. You do not want California residency.
34. Grades and MCAT scores no longer matter once you're at school- everyone starts off the same.
35. "First choices" are a tricky thing. Stay open-minded. You might be surprised at which schools fit.
36. Your case is NOT unique.
37. People on SDN do NOT represent the "normal" application pool
38. If you have a 32/3.7+ and someone says you are not very competitive at mid-tier schools then you are likely on SDN.
 
Last edited:

Fakesmile

Full Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2008
Messages
444
Reaction score
0
I feel like it would probably depend on what you got the C in. If it's in a prereq, it'll probably have a bigger impact than if it was in some random class you took.

The C is for Bio 1 (one of the courses I took in my first semester in freshman) :(:(:(:(:(
 

Monk11

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2008
Messages
25
Reaction score
0
Crossout about 5-10 of the blow hard statements and you have yourself a nice little list.
 

bluesmd

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2008
Messages
2,206
Reaction score
4
you don't want to NOT have stat residency either
 

Excelsius

Carpe Noctem
10+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2008
Messages
1,667
Reaction score
12
...
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.

A double major can be helpful especially in certain circumstances. For example, if you are trying to take a lot of BCPM classes to raise your GPA or prove that you can do at a four year institution just as well as in your CC, then a double major gives you the opportunity to take all those extra classes, perhaps eventually avoiding a post-bacc degree.
 

Climberak

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
252
Reaction score
3
1. If you have one or two "C" grades it does not really matter as long as you have nothing lower and make more A's than B's. (Exception may be top programs: WashU, Hopkins...)
2. An upward trend is good for your GPA (if you messed up your freshman/sophomore year)
3. Better to take your premed prerequisites at a 4-year university than at a community college; however, if you cannot, just make sure you take a few higher level science courses at your university afterwords and do well on the MCAT
4. Club membership=crummy EC
5. Apply EARLY, as in the first day it opens. Yep, the very first day
6. If you go to an accredited four year college/university, its not going to be deterimental to your application if it doesn't have an ivy league name.
7. When it comes to your personal statement, revise revise revise revise revise and revise some more.
8. Take the MCAT only when you know you will have enough time to study and when you know you will comfortably achieve your target grade.
9. Keep in contact with other pre-meds, your advisors, career centers, etc. (not just SDN...), it will pay itself back to help others.
10. Start your clinical volunteering and shadowing early to show dedication and interest, not a few weeks prior to submitting application.
11. Get a strong letter of recommendation from science profs and MDs.
12. A double major will not give you any significant advantage.
13. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well, rather than people who seem "impressive" in some way.
14. Repeat number 5.
15. If you have a low GPA, YES you can still get into medical school; HOWEVER, you must have something else in your application (work experience, MCAT score, ECs) that shows your dedication to hard work and medicine.
16. Don't underestimate the importance of a good personal statement!!! Make the reader remember you (or at least glance at your application twice)
17. If you think you have even the slightest chance, try for the Fee Assistance Program (it can save you thousands!).
18. Don't get discouraged by long secondaries. You'll finish them... eventually...
19. Unless financially crippled, go to ALL interviews until an acceptance is achieved. It would be foolish to throw away good odds "just because."
20. Did I mention apply early?
21. Note that 5, 14 and 20 apply doubly to secondaries.
22. Everyone knows someone with a 40/4.0 who didn't get in anywhere and someone with a 3.0/30 who got into his top choice. It doesn't mean anything. Just do your best.
23. Spam filters are your worst enemies.
24. Re: #22, that being said, apply broadly and reasonably. It's ok to have a couple dream schools, but don't make your entire list top-heavy.
25. If you have any worries about your competitiveness or intend to apply to a broad range of schools (and you should), in addition to 11 you should also get a letter from a humanities professor.
26. Take everything you read on this website with a grain of salt, though it can be useful.
27. Numbers are the most important part of your application.
28. They want real-people doctors, not just the best resume in their stack. And hey, guess what! You're a real person! Show your humanity, your genuine interest, WHY you're passionate about medicine, and show them that, given the chance, you'll do wonderful and impressive things. You'll be fine. Really.
29. Seriously. You'll be fine. Calm the eff down.
30. Be patient. There are 1,000,000 (estimation) applicants just like you waiting for their secondary/interview invite/decision letter too.
31. You're not "too good" for any school. You're not "entitled" to a top-10. Get over yourself. Any acceptance is a blessing, and more than 60% of applicants can hope for.
32. Rankings are basically useless unless you're going into academia (and even then, they're arguable). USNews = the devil.
33. You do not want California residency.
34. Grades and MCAT scores no longer matter once you're at school- everyone starts off the same.
35. "First choices" are a tricky thing. Stay open-minded. You might be surprised at which schools fit.
36. Your case is NOT unique.
37. People on SDN do NOT represent the "normal" application pool
38. If you have a 32/3.7+ and someone says you are not very competitive at mid-tier schools then you are likely on SDN.
39. Don't let the numbers of the applicants on this site make you feel inadequate. These people are in a high percentile, and are not an accurate representation the total applicant pool.
40. Learn from the experience of those who have already gone through the cycle, not those who are currently in the cycle.
 
Top