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Rush Anesthesia Revisited

Discussion in 'Anesthesiology' started by desflurainman, Jan 2, 2017.

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  1. desflurainman

    desflurainman

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    My sole purpose of making this thread is to shed light some new light on the Rush Anesthesia program as it currently stands in 2017. I really care about this program and i really want to see it attract great resident candidates, and that has to start with telling the truth as it stands.
    I'm a current Rush Resident and just like many med students, i read the disparaging posts here on SDN and it gave me pause about the program, but i stand here today with confident saying that things have been dramatically different than i expected.

    1) Work horse program? i don't know what constitutes a work horse program but a typical day at Rush starts at 6am and you are relieved by 5, latest by 6pm. But this varies depending on how many cases you are assigned and how busy the board is. Some days you get out by 3pm if it's a light day, and there is typically at least 1 light day a week. If you are pre-call or post-latecall, you are definitely out before 3pm (i've been out as early as 1:30pm). The people running the board are very cognisant about getting the right people out at the right time. So i would say my average logged hrs per week is roughly 48-50hrs a week. I would imagine this is is closer to 55-60hrs on subspecialty rotation (cards, peds, ob, etc...)

    2) call schedule? typically you take about 3-5 24hr calls a month, and 1 late call a month. You get most of your wknds off, you might take 1 wknd call a month. To me this is great and very fair.

    3) Program director? First i like to say I personally have a lot of respect for the old program director, despite the things that has been said about him, he is truly knowledgeable and cares a lot about his residents. Having said that i can see how his method and personality (even though he is really a nice guy) can rub some people the wrong way. But all of that is irrelevant since we now have a new program director, who is way more approachable and is passionate about the program, and she is really working hard to make things better.

    4) faculty and teaching? protected didactic time has improved drastically, it's actually great now. 2-3 lectures a week + morning conferences on wednesday, and 1 grand round a month. This was better than most places i rotated at as a med student. In addition, there is a new wave of newly hired younger attendings (from places like duke and harvard) who are passionate about teaching. Most of the attendings do some form of teaching, a few don't teach but you can learn somethings by watching them. Again most attendings are relatively easy to work with, but a few will give you headaches but i think this is typical of most places. Lastly, last year Basic exam pass rate was 100%.

    5) Anesthesia techs and Room turnover issues? this is no longer even close to being an issue anymore, you simply call the anesthesia tech at the end of the case and they promptly come in to turn the room over, no questions asked, end of story. And if there is something you need that is not in the room, simply pick up the phone and they bring it in right away.

    6) Scheduler/Scheduling? I haven't had any issues so far, but maybe i will down the line, but as of right now, i can't complain.

    7) Resident Morale? The classes above mine might not have the greatest comradery but my class definitely hangs out together, study together, and help each other out. I have had co-residents help put in IV in my next patients and i have done the same for people. We help each other setup rooms etc...I would say most of us are happy overall.

    Overall, i think Rush has dramatically improved in the last 2 years and most of the thanks goes to the current Chief Residents and PD. They exemplify everything i strive to be. Smart, approachable, and passionate about the program. And lastly, it's indisputable that you will get excellent training at Rush, even those that spoke bad about the program admitted to this. The fellowship list is impressive every year and those that venture into PP do well for themselves.

    I urge everyone to consider this program when formulating their Rank list, things have dramatically improve over the last couple years and will continue to improve with the new PD. Beside Chicago is a great place to live, there is a lot to do here.

    PS: If you are considering Pain fellowship, this is undoubtedly where you want to be (certainly, the best program in chicago for that) the Pain attendings here are well known in the field and can open some doors for you.

    Good luck with match this year everyone! PM if you have any personal question i didn't cover here.
     
    DokterMom likes this.
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  3. San Marzano

    San Marzano ASA Member 7+ Year Member

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    Speaking as someone currently in a well known program that's well known for treating residents like crap, don't treat your residents badly please. Treat them well because they are people and should be taken care of. Also, if you have someone with poor English language typing skills, don't ask them to post on an internet forum. You aren't doing your program any favors. Lastly, make sure your program has a 100% boards pass rate like this posters program has. My program works residents to the bone and wonders why they fail boards year after year!
     
  4. CriticallyCarED4

    CriticallyCarED4

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    My Two Cents for an applicant perspective:

    Despite the massive bad press about Rush I had a few good thoughts after interviewing there. First, the dinner was well attended and the residents were a lot of fun and brought up the notorious SDN post at the very beginning. No one denied that there were many problems or that the bad press was unwarranted. Indeed most of the improvements stated above were accomplished by this year's chiefs and the year before.

    Second, the program director was very nice and approachable. Being new, there were a few questions she couldn't give definite answers to during the Q&A, and her honesty and lack of politicking impressed me. She even admitted outright that financial considerations are a high priority in regards to resident initiated policies or changes to the curriculum. Which is understandable considering anesthesia at Rush is private practice but I still think I'd prefer a true academic setting.

    As a stand alone comment, the chair left the impression that every graduate must do a fellowship to be relevant. While I don't disagree I'd prefer a chair that was more accepting of any career path my peers and I choose. At least they can back it up. The match list was extremely impressive.

    That being said, I also felt the vibe of the program was a bit stiff. The residents who helped during the day were very enthusiastic but they and the others we encountered on the tour looked exhausted. A sure sign of overwork. This may be improving but I can't prove it one way or the other.

    All in all I can say I was pleasantly surprised by many aspects of my interview. Though I won't be ranking it highly as I want a program that prioritizes learning over income, Rush doesn't have trauma, and it has a larger class size than I want to be a part of.




    Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
     
  5. desflurainman

    desflurainman

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    Jan 2, 2017
    I'm glad to hear your honest and refreshing opinion and agree with a lot of what you said. Rush has always been a great place to train but it wasn't always the easiest place to get through residency but that has definitely changed in last couple years, which is why I now think candidates should consider ranking it high. Because now you not only get the excellent clinical training, but you now also get a "nonmalignant" environment and much improved didactic (many places won't lecture you 3x a week like they now do in Rush).

    Overworked? Maybe in the past but right now, avg hrs are 48-55hrs on general month (you can add 5hrs to that in your CA2 yr and on subspecialty rotation), to me that's a really good work hr for residency training, to me anything less than that you are not getting adequate training.

    The other things you mentioned are fair criticism but I would argue that the trauma thing is really not as important as you think, because once you have done transplant you have really done trauma. Again I don't know what your ultimate career goal is.
     
  6. TIVA23

    TIVA23

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    Sep 19, 2016
    Hi everyone,

    Interviewed at RUSH and I have to say I was very happy with the program. I did however forget to ask about the Intern year (Things can get a little foggy on the interview trail after a while). We were given a USB with most of the info but I guess I would like to just hear some opinions on the PGY-1 year with respect to hours, usefulness of rotations, treatment by other departments etc. If anyone has any info on this I would love to hear it!

    Thanks again!
     
  7. Wiscoblue

    Wiscoblue ASA Member 2+ Year Member

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    Isn't Rush a CRNA training program?
     
  8. Consigliere

    Consigliere 7+ Year Member

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    Neither here nor there
    Yep. When I went there, the program was ranked #1 in the US.
     
  9. cybercops

    cybercops 7+ Year Member

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    Apr 16, 2009
    SoCal
    MDApps:
    I am another current resident at Rush, and I would like to 2nd the original poster and add my thoughts to this thread. I am not a traditional applicant. In fact, I was offered a spot here after failing to match and the previous PD gave me a spot after hearing recommendation from the previous GSurg PD. I worked as general surgery resident for 2 years in different places, so I interacted with different anesthesiology residents of different programs. After working at Rush as a resident, I think Rush is a strong clinical program because:

    1. While Rush does not give you specialty rotation during your CA1 year, you do have to take care of very sick patients (being a 3rd referral center), and I feel very comfortable taking care of these population now.
    2. In the last year, we had 4 new attendings with more to come. They are very approachable and very willing to teach. We love them, and these young attendings, together with our current ones, make our program more learning-oriented.
    3. The support system is very good now. Now, I do not have to call the techs to turn over the room (unless you need special equipment like art line setup or Glidescope). Now, you even have preoperative techs who go around and place IVs for you. It is very helpful for us in high turn over rooms. If you want to practice IV, they will respect your demands too.
    4. The leadership: We have our new PD this year. She is great. She keeps asking us what she could make the program better, and she actually follows with our recommendations.
    5. We have good relationships within our classes. We are a big program, so getting along with everyone is hard, and we do have conflicts sometimes, but people are mostly happy with each other.
    6. We match well if you want to do fellowships. If you want to get jobs, our attendings and our reputation of training good clinicians are well-known, so getting them is also easy.

    CONS:
    With all the good things, I do think Rush has some shortcomings. The most important thing that people touch is we are not a trauma center, so ZERO trauma experience. Currently, our CT ICU is close to us, but it will change in the future when our attendings are going there.

    Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.
     
  10. ItBurnsInMyHand

    ItBurnsInMyHand

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    May 10, 2017
    Word on the street is that the old PD is coming back?
     
  11. dchz

    dchz ASA Member 2+ Year Member

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    Sep 25, 2012
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    I was a mid-ranged applicant that interviewed at rush a few years ago.

    As a current resident looking back, i have a few points to contribute:

    I recall the dinner at rush, it was great. Everyone was friendly and it was a great experience at a nice Italian restaurant. Hands down the best part of the interview days.

    perspective as a previous interviewee:

    The program director outright addressed the SDN posts and how they are working on things. However, the things during the speech that i remember were red flags: even though they admit there were tons of things they need to improve on, their emphasis was "things don't change overnight". what i got from this: you're gonna be the guinea pigs (at best) while we transition the program. I know i'm not the most competitive applicant, but if i'm someone that cares my training, why would I sign up to be the guinea pigs while you work things out? This tells me you need at least another 4-5 years to really attract the good residents, this speech happened 2-3 years ago, so i guess OP's public relation post timing is right on track.

    Tour of the facility: may be i'm spoiled by my institution's new hospital, but i recall the ORs at rush wasn't particularly impressive or state of the art.

    Resident that showed up during the interview process: I recall the chief resident showed up and barely interacted with the applicants, didn't really tell us anything that echoed the "change in process". Kinda gave me this vibe that he thinks he's a hot shot because he matched pain, and didn't really care too much about the program because he is literally months away from being outta here. The other residents that showed up looked outright tired and worn out, which really matched the workhorse reputation and emphasized that it was a program in transition (at best).

    For the above reasons, i didn't put it very high on my list. However, Chicago is a very desirable location for a lot of people. That should be considered a huge plus for Rush.

    Looking back as a current resident in a mid range mid-sized program:

    Having no trauma experience is probably the biggest downfall. As someone that transfused 120+ of RBC and FFP and all the PLT in the hospital on day 1 of anesthesia, the hair you grow on your balls during trauma cases should be essential to all residency training. Not because all pp jobs require trauma, but the experience and perspective you get while doing a huge GSW with a bullet in the LV makes you a better doctor in all aspects of anesthesia.

    Work hours: my logged work hours are approx 60-70/month, so if OP's post is correct, General OR for a Rush resident is less hour intensive than my program. I agree anything less is probably inadequate training, but I also believe not having done trauma is also inadequate training. As a resident, i would work extra 10 hours a week just to do level 1 traumas. However, not a lot would share this sentiment as many pp jobs require 0 trauma.

    OR teaching, many programs boast about OR teaching, but few really delivers (really a knock to my program since i never experienced teaching at Rush). message to future residents: expect your learning as your own responsibility.
     
  12. anbuitachi

    anbuitachi ASA Member 7+ Year Member

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    I'd say it's a chill program hour wise If only 48-50 hrs for ca1
     
  13. Triple AAA

    Triple AAA 2+ Year Member

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    If this is true, it would be a HUGE mistake on the part of the program.
     
  14. Izzyman

    Izzyman ASA Member 2+ Year Member

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    Can anyone here comment on why Rush won't let me know who my co-interns will be in 2018? I'm doing advanced. I've asked the administrative staff before and they ask me why I need that information or how I'll use it. Weird.
     
  15. DrCommonSense

    DrCommonSense

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    Sounds worrisome about Rush. What was wrong with the last PD?

    If the PD was so bad, I have to question if the Chair is equally bad allowing the PD to be horrible. Sounds like the Chair was fine with that.
     
    Izzyman likes this.
  16. nimbus

    nimbus Member 10+ Year Member

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    Maybe they have a privacy policy and they don't want you to spam them. You can always ask people to PM you here...or try setting up a private Facebook group. Then those who want to can opt in. Sometimes salespeople will try to get these lists to sell crappy mortgages or insurance policies and things of that nature.
     
  17. Izzyman

    Izzyman ASA Member 2+ Year Member

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    Yea but it's not like the administrative staff doesn't know me or my email. Also I'm not asking for personal information like phone numbers or even emails. Just weird.


    Yea the chair seemed very stoic on interview day.
     
  18. Ronin786

    Ronin786 ASA Member 5+ Year Member

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    Maybe they didnt fill yet and don't want to show people.
     
  19. Consigliere

    Consigliere 7+ Year Member

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    Neither here nor there
    Who is the chairman nowadays?
     
  20. Izzyman

    Izzyman ASA Member 2+ Year Member

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    Kenneth tuman.

    Also, they filled pre-soap process. I had access to unfilled positions b/c a friend didn't match.
     
  21. anesthopeful92

    anesthopeful92

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    Sep 5, 2017
    Current anesthesia applicant here (interviewing this cycle), living in the Chicagoland area. I would likely rank the place high in order to avoid moving. If I got an interview, it would be nice to hear some more opinions from current residents but from what I have heard, the new PD seems indifferent regarding the best interests of the residents and has a reputation of having 'favorites.' I would appreciate someone who has been a resident under this new regime to shine some light on this aka say otherwise. Doesn't it make sense for a PD to serve as a positive role model and be invested in all of his residents? Or is this just something I'm idealizing and is relatively uncommon?
     
    Izzyman likes this.

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