lanashif

7+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2010
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So I took a practice SAT and just received my score today. I did relatively well on the reading/verbal are, and I know that I can raise it easily, but my math grade was unsatisfactory. I am only a freshman so i know that this could explain it, but still, I believe that I should try to learn what I can now. So my question is: how did you study for the math section and what did you get on that part? I don't want to go to a course so I would prefer something that I could self-teach. Thanks in advance!
 

jvanewportnews

10+ Year Member
Dec 29, 2008
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Virginia
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If you go to collegeconfidential.com, they will tell you to practice, practice, practice, and you MUST get the blue book (The Official SAT Study Guide 2nd Edition). The Math section of the SAT involves Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry. I started off scoring around 600 on my math section, and after a few weeks of practicing, I've managed to get up to 700, add or take a few points.

I use:
The Official SAT Study Guide Second Edition
The Princeton Review: Cracking the SAT
and Barron's SAT 2400

I highly recommend the first and 3rd books. The first book of course because it's from the test makers, and the 10 full practice tests in the back resemble the questions from the actual test and is the best practice. Barron's 2400 gives invaluable tips especially on the math section of the SAT. The Princeton Review has a list of vocab words that could be useful on the critical reading section also.
I, too am also opposed to taking an SAT course because I don't feel it would help me as much as I need to get a high score.
Since you are a freshman and may not have taken all 3 of the classes, you still have time, so don't stress about it too much. Just get a practice book and study.
So far I've gone from a 1720 to a 2015 on the practice tests with the blue book-aiming for 2100!
 
Mar 26, 2010
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In my head
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Since you're still a freshman, toooootally do not worry about it because you'll score so much higher during junior year. That said, doing SAT math prep starting now is not a bad idea because come junior year, SAT math will be very familiar/easy :thumbup:.

However, your best bet with a good SAT score is keeping up with all your classes, like actually "learning" math and not just memorizing formulas and stuff before a test and forgetting it all afterwards. Also, take the most challenging classes you can, like AP's. Starting sophomore year, I took AP courses in english language and composition, english lit, world history, american history, bio, and chem, and honors geometry/pre-cal classes. I got a 2340 on my first try with 2 weeks of SAT prep (all math prep because it was my weaker area, and practice exams). AP english classes really boost your verbal scores because AP exam questions are so much harder than SAT ones :D. Oh, and AP's are also great for SAT II exams like bio and chem (jokes compared to the AP bio & chem exams).

Definitely don't pay for prep courses, it's unnecessary spending, but you seem to know that :). You have a great head start (my friends and I all started thinking about the SAT during junior year), you can finish a ton of prep books in 2-3 years :laugh:. But best thing about the US is their schools/classes, so take advantage of that. Now that I'm not in the US anymore I mainly have to self-teach to learn and it sucks.
 

lanashif

7+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2010
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I know I don't have to worry about it yet, but I was still upset with my score. I thought that I would do better. I think I will get some practice books. I'll probably take it next year again so I want to see if I do better. Hopefully I will because I need a high score for the college program I am planning on getting in to.
 
Jun 21, 2010
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If you're looking for some additional help, http://www.viatutor.com has some free SAT Math lectures and practice tests, just so you can evaluate how much time you'll need to allocate towards practice books/practice classes, etc.

But yeah, the SATs are 2+ years away. It's good that you're starting now, but don't worry too much.