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pRHOfessional7

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So I was online doing some research for my upcoming interview and I ran across this website: http://www.angelfire.com/on/podiatry/
Apparently it is a very disgruntled podiatrist who thinks it is his mission to warn those interested in the profession to stay away. I think it is from 2000, but it is still a pretty scary website. Anyone seen it? If not, check it out and tell me your personal views or experience. Is what this website saying relevant?
 

Podman

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I've across that site before, as well as the infamous network54.com 'podiatry forum'. In a nuttshell, these forums have a set group of disgruntled podiatrists who failed in the profession posting all over the place. I always found it interesting that people who fail tend to blame everyone and everything that surrounds them but themselves. It takes alot to succeed in any profession and specialty - nothing comes easy and it definitely starts from school.

To me personally, I'd rather learn from those who succeed in my profession rather than those who failed.
 

efs

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I wouldn't pay much attention to those sites. In fact, I didn't. During 1-2nd years some of my classmates also ran across those and got themselves worked up.

Some of the things they were saying included that there were no jobs to be had, and that we would only make $50-70,000 coming out of residency (if we were lucky).

Even if I were only making $70,000 it would still be double what I made before podiatry. More than enough to cover student loans and at least maintain my previous lifestyle. That hasn't been the case. I've certainly been better off after school than before. Yes, I still have some big student loans, but they are easily manageable.

The previously mentioned classmates also found they had multiple job offers and were able to settle down where they wanted to, and are making more than was suggested.

Here are a couple of lightly edited lines from a recent e-mail. (Edited to protect some anonymity.)

-----
I nearly took a job w/ a multispecialty group in ******** that was supposed to pay 6 figures the 1st yr, but just didn't like the idea of staying in ********. I took a so-so deal w/ a doc in *******, but negotiated a better deal the 2nd yr, and things have worked out well financially so far this 2nd yr. So much for all of that podiatry forum crap they used to post. I feel pretty confident that you could go into any non-podiatry school city and do very well.
-----

You can certainly read their forums, but be aware of what they are. Generally it is a couple of negative posters making multiple posts. Sometimes the same person/s using multiple names/aliases. Get out and talk to some of the people actually doing it and you will likely find a different story.

As a caveat, I would say that I have talked to a few people who had difficulty with finding a good residency. (Mutli-level programs, residencies closing, unscrupulous docs, etc. I think some of this has likely changed with the new residency formats, but there may still be some problem spots out there. I believe most of those could be avoided relatively easily.) Their stories can be pretty entertaining, but it is not the majority. All of the ones I know eventually found their way into better training programs and are doing well.

efs
 
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jonwill

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So I was online doing some research for my upcoming interview and I ran across this website: http://www.angelfire.com/on/podiatry/
Apparently it is a very disgruntled podiatrist who thinks it is his mission to warn those interested in the profession to stay away. I think it is from 2000, but it is still a pretty scary website. Anyone seen it? If not, check it out and tell me your personal views or experience. Is what this website saying relevant?


People like this always crack me up. This is probably some poor guy who is not very bright and figures that, because this happened to him, it must happen to everyone. And for that very reason (he's not that bright), he probably didn't have very good training or get any job offers.

I've said it a hundred times: podiatry is not "an easy way" to make a fortune. If you are talented and hard-working, you will do well. If you "eek" your way through, there are no promises.

Gee, you'd think that if all of these poor podiatry residents graduating from residency weren't getting any job offers, you'd probably hear about it :laugh: But then again, I'd rather take advice from the 15,000 successful podiatrists than the few disgruntled ones. FYI...look at some of the dates on the website (1990's). This guy could also be a product of the "over-admit" era that occurred in the late 80's-early 90's in which some people really did get screwed.
 

Feli

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There are people all over the place who didn't apply themself in school and/or can't market their skills properly. They talk pretty loud, and they have lots of time to complain since they obviously don't attract or keep many patients. There are MDs who barely got through school, took the crummy FP residency none of their classmates wanted, and are working in a college student health clinic for $75k right now too. Are you gonna aspire to be like the people who did the minimum?

You can listen to the "doom and gloom" guys or you can listen to guys who did apply themselves (that is, if they aren't too busy doing surgery and investing their $ :) ).

I've heard the "podiatrists don't make much money" and "it's hard to get a big enough patient base" also. Then, you make a sample call to get an appointment with a good podiatrist and are told that his soonest opening - barring an emergency - is a month or two away. Then, you go to a podiatry conference and see people who applied themself, trained at a good residency, and are at the pinnacle of the profession. Then, you decide for yourself...

The "doom and gloom" and low income basically comes from a few causes (usually a combo):
-didn't work hard enough in school
-didn't get a very good residency
-don't keep up with literature or advances in the profession
-stayed too close to a pod school
-aren't competent enough that many other doctors refer to them
-can't market themself
-didn't read their HMO and insurance company contracts very carefully

Personally, I don't see how someone could totally fail in podiatry to the point where they'd whine as much as some of those guys on the anti-pod websites do. Even supposing a podiatrist graduated 30yrs ago and has no residency or surgical training, they can still make a very reasonable living doing C&C, biomechanics, etc as long as they don't try to practice in an area saturated with many other pods who are more highly trained (ie an area near a pod school).

For a graduate who worked hard, applied themself, and got a good residency with high level surgical/derm/wound care/etc training, it's fairly obvious that the sky's the limit. Just attend any major podiatry conference...
 

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i am not a practicing podiatrist, nor in podiatry school. i am currently applying to podiatry school. i recently received a cd rom and informational packet about podiatry (after i had already decided podiatry was for me) and i have to say the information given seemed to be a bit "fictional" i have shadowed many podiatrist in my state (kansas), most seem to be in a similar bind. This being having to keep satellite offices and nursing homes. each one seemed to have to struggle to keep business open and openly warned me about this. this may be slightly due to Kansas law not allowing podiatrist to touch the ankle or calf.
im not saying i agree with the angry podiatry web site described. i just know that if the profession is being slightly "over glorified" by recruiters, every student needs to read some negative from this guys web site or other sources. i cringe any time some one personal view is described as meaningless due to their assumed lack of hard work.
i think its important for me as well as other students to hear the success stories of podiatry- as well as how some very smart and hard working podiatrist are really struggling now with unequal state laws and cutting of health care costs.

podiatry is a weird profession, in some sections the usa podiatry is great profession, however in other pockets its fighting to keep patients. I shadowed for a podiatrist that can only find work doing 90 percent toe nail removal.
my advice would be to shadow were you plan to practice see for your self what your area is like. That will be more accurate then both the recruiters ,angry podiatrist or me.

just don’t let any one every tell you to ignore a persons view point since they feel they are a isolated incident. as a future podiatrist, we should not be ignoring these people but learning from them. For those of us who do become successful podiatrist, it should be our duty to reach out to people like this guy to better the profession as a whole, if that’s even possible.

as for me, despite reading the web site i am looking forward to a career in podiatry. i just enjoy the work they do. ill worry about the money later i suppose.
if you like what you are going to be doing in podiatry, you have nothing to worry about. there will always be feet ;)
 

jonwill

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I think that one big reason for the different feelings on the profession, even amongst doctors in the field, is the huge discrepancy in training. Pods coming out now have so many options because of their training. Many go into multispecialty and ortho groups, others work directly for hospitals, and some go into private practice. But the majority of podiatric physicians will receive 3-year surgical training.

This was not the case 20 or even 10 years ago for many. Some pods got very good training while others received little or none. For the latter, the only viable option was to start a private practice. For those that succeeded, great! For those that did not or for whatever reason, are still struggling today, have little or no options.

I believe that this also accounts for the large discrepancy in salary reports.
 

Feli

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...the large discrepancy in salary reports.
Another thing is just that some people expect too much too fast. It's certainly not "show me the $$$!" the day one finishes residency.

Other people just seem to expect too much - period. The average US podiatrist salary is around $115-145k depending on location (salary.com), but that is an average for a reason. For every 95th percentile DPM who owns a booming group practice and makes $500k, there must be 10 others somewhere around the 20th percentile that make roughly $85k in order to balance out the average.

It's certainly not like everyone is smack dab in the middle at $130k per year. I think some newer practitioners need a refresher course in statistics (definitiion of avg, median, percentiles, etc) before they claim the APMA, school, etc duped them. If they didn't apply themself and/or won't work hard, they may never even reach the average figure even late in their career. If you are in the bottom 25 percent in GPA, residency training, or experience (or a combination) then how can you expect to be in the 50th percentile in salary? It makes no sense to me! It seems to me that it's the same "doom and gloom"-ers over and over on the anti-pod sites. It doesn't bother me so much because the educated applicants I want to enter podiatry will see right through it.

I fully expect to be working hard to pay off loans and buy into a practice during my first few years after residency, but I do expect to be making six figures pretty soon after that. Unlike the guy who made the anti-pod website, I personally sure don't think all those ads in the back of JAPMA, Podiatry Management, etc are made up lol :laugh:
 

gustydoc

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i am not a practicing podiatrist, nor in podiatry school. i am currently applying to podiatry school. i recently received a cd rom and informational packet about podiatry (after i had already decided podiatry was for me) and i have to say the information given seemed to be a bit "fictional" i have shadowed many podiatrist in my state (kansas), most seem to be in a similar bind. This being having to keep satellite offices and nursing homes. each one seemed to have to struggle to keep business open and openly warned me about this. this may be slightly due to Kansas law not allowing podiatrist to touch the ankle or calf.
im not saying i agree with the angry podiatry web site described. i just know that if the profession is being slightly "over glorified" by recruiters, every student needs to read some negative from this guys web site or other sources. i cringe any time some one personal view is described as meaningless due to their assumed lack of hard work.
i think its important for me as well as other students to hear the success stories of podiatry- as well as how some very smart and hard working podiatrist are really struggling now with unequal state laws and cutting of health care costs.

podiatry is a weird profession, in some sections the usa podiatry is great profession, however in other pockets its fighting to keep patients. I shadowed for a podiatrist that can only find work doing 90 percent toe nail removal.
my advice would be to shadow were you plan to practice see for your self what your area is like. That will be more accurate then both the recruiters ,angry podiatrist or me.

just don’t let any one every tell you to ignore a persons view point since they feel they are a isolated incident. as a future podiatrist, we should not be ignoring these people but learning from them. For those of us who do become successful podiatrist, it should be our duty to reach out to people like this guy to better the profession as a whole, if that’s even possible.

as for me, despite reading the web site i am looking forward to a career in podiatry. i just enjoy the work they do. ill worry about the money later i suppose.
if you like what you are going to be doing in podiatry, you have nothing to worry about. there will always be feet ;)

I am from Wichita, KS so I too have seen first hand how some of the pods in the state are struggling. The fact is that of all the pods I have met who are having a hard time, not one of them has had a two or three year residency. It may seem unfair, but as the quality of podiatric post graduate training increases some of our predecessors will be left behind. There are also pods in Kansas who are doing really well. I think the real key to success in a state like KS is to have sufficient training (PM&S 24-36) and then to really convey that to other FP docs in the area you want to practice in. The doc I shadowed in Wichita has so much surgery he doesn't have time for clinic because he worked really hard getting to know the other docs in the area and built a referral base. The older guys who are complaining about having to bounce around nursing homes probably have not kept up with their education and built the relationships they should have with their colleagues in the area.
 
D

Dr_Feelgood

He didn't go to a school in the Midwest which is don't find shocking. Add a school of your choice.
 

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While I agree that you should weigh the good aspects with the bad, my only problem with the Kansas example is that the poor circumstances are either a function of the state's (location's) lack of knowledge about podiatry (and consequently its inappropriate/limiting legislation) or the specific podiatrists' lack of business savvy (setting up/keeping practice in a state/location where conditions are unfavorable and continuing to stay there while doing nothing about it despite a dearth of available patients to see and/or diversity of procedures to perform.) I still think the profession itself is awesome regardless of these mitigating and (hopefully/possibly/presently) temporary circumstances in specific locations.

Also, I think the negative sites and forums are simply made by trolls and losers who, as jonwill said before, are lacking in some respect and want to rationalize their failures by blaming the profession rather than themselves. It's my belief that if someone works hard in school and strives for some sort of excellence (personal/professional/etc.) then the pattern isn't just going to stop once they graduate/go through residency; these types of people aren't going to just give up, roll over, and start complaining on internet sites once things get rough. These people will work hard after graduation/residency to improve their circumstances either by networking with the local medical community to improve the visibility of podiatry in the overall community, demonstrate their skills in hopes of doing the aforementioned, try to get some sort of political will going with patients/other podiatrists to improve legislation in their community, or move on to better pastures. Complaining about frivolous or fixable problems on the internet rather than trying to improve their circumstances is just lazy and defeatist on their part; this attitude is probably much similar to their attitudes throughout school.

On the salary thing, I don't know if this has been posted yet, but when I asked the first podiatrist I shadowed (who, btw, was truly happy with his profession and subsequent success despite being part of that over admission generation with a lack of residency spots) about different demographic and/or salary information, he called the APMA and they faxed over results from a survey taken by podiatrists in 2005 that had some of this info. Of course, only about 1/5 of podiatrists in the US (~3,000 out of 15, 000?) responded to the survey, but I thought it was satisfactory for my purposes (those purposes being pure curiosity.) I don't think there would be any school recruitment bias in this survey unless there are about 3000 podiatrists who, as individuals, are making a concerted effort to help out all of the schools at once.

Here's a summary on the APMA website: http://apma.org/s_apma/doc.asp?CID=11&DID=19585

And if you want the survey methods, who responded, # years practiced, other useful info., etc., you can check out the whole article at:
http://www.japmaonline.org/cgi/cont...e=3/1/2006&tdate=4/30/2006&resourcetype=HWCIT

Of course, I don't know if the article is accessible to everyone, but I bet we can copy/paste some pertinent info. or something. This one was released in March/April 2006, so we might be able to wait a few months to get a newer report in order compare it to the info. provided.

One last thing: Is there a way to put a sticky post that addresses the blatantly negative/troll-filled websites like the network54 et al.? We don't necessarily have to state an opinion one way or another on the pros/cons of sites like this, but it'd be nice for people to know that people at SDN know about those sites and for those new to SDN/podiatry to see some thoughts on the reliability of these sites without having to start new threads all the time. I just remember when I first found out about pod and my excitement reading the SDN boards and then the subsequent-and, thankfully, ameliorated-disappointment/let down when first reading those other sites.


P.S.: What ever happened to Whiskers? Despite his/her negativity, at least he/she was funny. I miss the randomness.
 

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Aw...the worst part about being long winded is that posts will pop up that make your point much more succinctly before you hit the reply button. Oh well.:D
 

IlizaRob

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From what I have seen, those poeple on those websites who devote their time and efforts to complain and whine (wasting their time when they could be doing something constructive) are the MD wannabes who were never passionate about podiatry to begin with. Their negatively is simply their pathetic attempt to rationalize their failure. I hope no one gets too worked up over these losers. It doesnt matter what you do. If you are passionate about and good at what you do, you will do well and be happy. They have no one to blame but themselves.
 
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cool_vkb

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From what I have seen, those poeple on those websites who devote their time and efforts to complain and whine (wasting their time when they could be doing something constructive) are the MD wannabes who were never passionate about podiatry to begin with.

i'am just having hard time understand this attitude of Pre-med people. What exactly does it mean by MD wannabies. I mean isnit Podiatry a branch medicine. I always wanted to be \treating foot & ankle (iam a Cricket Sports fan). So when i heard abt Podiatry it loved the idea of specializing so early instead of med school.

So when people say, they are actually MD wannabies. What exactly does it mean and why do they dont succeed. Do you mean by MD wannabies that they were intending to be IM or FMs later. Bcoz even after doing MD, its not like one can practice the entire body. We still have to specialize in certain body part or a certain speciality and only limit ourself to that ,unless soemone is looking for lawsuits. So wats so bad abt Podiatry? Its just a specialization one chooses to do while in med school. where as in regular med school people do that after graduating. So why do these people fail?
 
D

Dr_Feelgood

So why do these people fail?

Attitude, drive and a belief that they are entitled to something.

I do feel that this is an example of choosing a good school will effect your career. The creater may have had no choice about where he/she went. He/she could have had the doctor at any cost thought.

I think that his attitude stems from 1) the creaters chosen pod school which led to 2) scrambling and getting a poor residency program which led to a 3) poor career outlook.
 

Feli

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...So when people say, they are actually MD wannabies. What exactly does it mean and why do they dont succeed...
The "MD wannabe" is just a blanket term used for pod/DO/OD/dent/chiropractor/etc etc etc students who started school mostly for respect to feed their ego, high salary, and to be called "doctor."
^^If those are your reasons for choosing anything (even MD), you're probably not going to be very satisfied.
 

IlizaRob

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The "MD wannabe" is just a blanket term used for pod/DO/OD/dent/chiropractor/etc etc etc students who started school mostly for respect to feed their ego, high salary, and to be called "doctor."
^^If those are your reasons for choosing anything (even MD), you're probably not going to be very satisfied.

:thumbup:
 

KHep

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Do the figures given by salary.com include residents? Technically they are podiatrists just without the postgrad training. Just curious. Other thought is that that figure probably includes pods working at VAs and/or Armed Forces. Their salaries are generally quite a bit lower.
 
D

Dr_Feelgood

Do the figures given by salary.com include residents? Technically they are podiatrists just without the postgrad training. Just curious. Other thought is that that figure probably includes pods working at VAs and/or Armed Forces. Their salaries are generally quite a bit lower.

A lot of times they get their stats from the US census bureau and the department of labor.

This is a great time of year to talk about the subject (tax season). How many American's tell the government really how much they make??? Since many pods still are in solo practice, I'm sure their is a little book fixing.

DMU is currently running an alumni study which includes salary, and from what I have heard it is surprising how many responders are making over 200K.
 

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You guys should look at what someone recently posted under interview feedback for the california school.
 
D

Dr_Feelgood

You guys should look at what someone recently posted under interview feedback for the california school.

I love how he knows the salary of every pod in the US. I'm sure Kaiser may pay well but I would never claim that they are the best paying place and say that you don't make much. I know a pod in Denver who is making $600K/year. I didn't do his taxes but he explained some of the business choice that allowed him to make that amount.

But this guy knows everything. I seriously, seriously seriously urge students to chose your schools wisely.
 

pRHOfessional7

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So whats a good choice? If Pod schools are not technically ranked, how can I make sure that my gut feeling is not leading me to doom?
 

Feli

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You guys should look at what someone recently posted under interview feedback for the california school.
That's funny stuff. I bet it's a kid who flunked out of the school second semester or graduated last in his class. Either that, or it's the same guy posting under 10 different aliases on "the podiatry forum" instead of putting in job applications and making connections with FP docs and other DPMs who will refer to him.

If you barely get by as a student, don't get a great residency, and then try to set up a practice right next to a podiatry school, you're just not gonna do very well. A freshman business student could tell you that...

Also, I love how he thinks Kaiser is the highest paying DPM job??? Any person who has had even one class in basic economics or business could tell you that you won't get very rich until you are your own boss.
 
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jonwill

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That's funny stuff. I bet it's a kid who flunked out of the school second semester or graduated last in his class. Either that, or it's the same guy posting under 10 different aliases on "the podiatry forum" instead of putting in job applications and making connections with FP docs and other DPMs who will refer to him.

If you barely get by as a student, don't get a great residency, and then try to set up a practice right next to a podiatry school, you're just not gonna do very well. A freshman business student could tell you that...

Also, I love how he thinks Kaiser is the highest paying DPM job??? Any person who has had even one class in basic economics or business could tell you that you won't get very rich until you are your own boss.

I was actually just rotating at a program where residents go to Kaiser for their 3rd year. I know for a fact that pods are treated very well there. I also just spoke with a graduate of the Kaiser system who is doing quite well.

This person's timeline is a bit skewed. He claims to have interviewed in 2000 which would mean that he would have graduated in 2004 and even if he did a two year, he would have just finished last year. Wow, 8 whole months in the profession. Yea, I'll take your advice!

I love how they always tell you to call your local podiatrist to get "the real story." The fact of the matter is that I have talked with and rotated with a ton of pods, all of which are happy. So per his own advice, podiatry is a great profession. And good call Krab, setting up a practice (if that is indeed what he tried) in a saturated area has little to do with podiatric medicine.

Don't expect that "interview feedback" to be there very long. However, he did leave his e-mail address on the post if anyone has any follow up questions!
 

krabmas

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And good call Krab, setting up a practice (if that is indeed what he tried) in a saturated area has little to do with podiatric medicine.

QUOTE]

As much as I love taking credit for other's ideas, that was not me. it was Feli
 

Podman

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I was actually just rotating at a program where residents go to Kaiser for their 3rd year. I know for a fact that pods are treated very well there. I also just spoke with a graduate of the Kaiser system who is doing quite well.

This person's timeline is a bit skewed. He claims to have interviewed in 2000 which would mean that he would have graduated in 2004 and even if he did a two year, he would have just finished last year. Wow, 8 whole months in the profession. Yea, I'll take your advice!

I love how they always tell you to call your local podiatrist to get "the real story." The fact of the matter is that I have talked with and rotated with a ton of pods, all of which are happy. So per his own advice, podiatry is a great profession. And good call Krab, setting up a practice (if that is indeed what he tried) in a saturated area has little to do with podiatric medicine.

Don't expect that "interview feedback" to be there very long. However, he did leave his e-mail address on the post if anyone has any follow up questions!

LOL, yeah he did leave his email for followup questions. I got one: "how come alot of people that graduated from your class did well with matching great residencies and you didn't?"
 

doclm

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I was actually just rotating at a program where residents go to Kaiser for their 3rd year. I know for a fact that pods are treated very well there. I also just spoke with a graduate of the Kaiser system who is doing quite well.

This person's timeline is a bit skewed. He claims to have interviewed in 2000 which would mean that he would have graduated in 2004 and even if he did a two year, he would have just finished last year. Wow, 8 whole months in the profession. Yea, I'll take your advice!

I love how they always tell you to call your local podiatrist to get "the real story." The fact of the matter is that I have talked with and rotated with a ton of pods, all of which are happy. So per his own advice, podiatry is a great profession. And good call Krab, setting up a practice (if that is indeed what he tried) in a saturated area has little to do with podiatric medicine.

Don't expect that "interview feedback" to be there very long. However, he did leave his e-mail address on the post if anyone has any follow up questions!

Has anyone emailed this person? I just did.

Remember about 6-7 months back where there was that one so called "DPM" from Cali who is now attending DO school. Does anyone think this could be the same disturbed individual?

I think its funny that this person claims to wasted 4 years, but what about residency? If you got your DPM, then did your residency but decided you couldn't find a job afterwards, wouldn't you waste more than 4 years??:confused:

Also, if you actually went through a residency program, you would know what DPM's are on staff at your hospital, so you wouldn't need to "ask your friend".
 

jonwill

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Has anyone emailed this person? I just did.

Remember about 6-7 months back where there was that one so called "DPM" from Cali who is now attending DO school. Does anyone think this could be the same disturbed individual?

I think its funny that this person claims to wasted 4 years, but what about residency? If you got your DPM, then did your residency but decided you couldn't find a job afterwards, wouldn't you waste more than 4 years??:confused:

Also, if you actually went through a residency program, you would know what DPM's are on staff at your hospital, so you wouldn't need to "ask your friend".

Ya, I e-mailed him. His e-mail is bogus just like his story probably is :laugh:
 
D

Dr_Feelgood

What a shame, his "feedback" mysteriously disappeared :eek:

Why did you take it off? I was hoping it would scare off applicants therefore decreasing competition.

Sometimes I think that websites and comments like that are made for that reason. Less students mean less competition and therefore more money. :eek:
 

SAFOOT

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Why did you take it off? I was hoping it would scare off applicants therefore decreasing competition.

Sometimes I think that websites and comments like that are made for that reason. Less students mean less competition and therefore more money. :eek:

Well Said
:smuggrin:
 

Feli

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What a shame, his "feedback" mysteriously disappeared :eek:
Why did you take it off? I was hoping it would scare off applicants therefore decreasing competition.

Sometimes I think that websites and comments like that are made for that reason. Less students mean less competition and therefore more money. :eek:
I'm 90% sure you were joking, Feelgood, but in case you aren't, I have to disagree.

I of course agree in principle that less pods is always a good thing for the pocketbook of the ones who do graduate, but I would like admissions to become more competitive. Having stronger applicants leads to better students and graduates. Increasingly smarter and harder working pods only helps to keep fostering the reputation of the profession. It'll eventually lead to more elite podiatrists which I believe to be a big part of how APMA and PPAC goals get accomplished. Lobbyist money is always helpful, but hard working and highly competent DPMs who are on diabetes boards, keynote speakers at wound care seminars, professors, surgical pioneers, etc eventually speak a lot louder.

I'm not saying there should be more pod students or more graduates, but better ones are always good for the future of any fiels. We sure don't need anti-pod websites or false feedback here scaring off potential good applicants to DPM programs. Just my view...
 
D

Dr_Feelgood

I'm 90% sure you were joking, Feelgood, but in case you aren't, I have to disagree.

I of course agree in principle that less pods is always a good thing for the pocketbook of the ones who do graduate, but I would like admissions to become more competitive. Having stronger applicants leads to better students and graduates. Increasingly smarter and harder working pods only helps to keep fostering the reputation of the profession. It'll eventually lead to more elite podiatrists which I believe to be a big part of how APMA and PPAC goals get accomplished. Lobbyist money is always helpful, but hard working and highly competent DPMs who are on diabetes boards, keynote speakers at wound care seminars, professors, surgical pioneers, etc eventually speak a lot louder.

I'm not saying there should be more pod students or more graduates, but better ones are always good for the future of any fiels. We sure don't need anti-pod websites or false feedback here scaring off potential good applicants to DPM programs. Just my view...

90%? It that like the 9 out of 10 dentist approve comerical where the tenth dentist get knocked out before he can answer?
 

IlizaRob

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90%? It that like the 9 out of 10 dentist approve comerical where the tenth dentist get knocked out before he can answer?

Ive got to hand it to those toothpaste commercials. Pretty clever..and funny.
 
D

Dr_Feelgood

I love reading the interview feedback. I'm not trying to insult the person who wrote this but if you make a comment like:

This was the first of 5 interviews and now I have a pretty good idea what to expect in the future. The interviewers were very polite and pleasant.

Does anyone see a problem scoring 10/10 in comparison to ALL other schools? How can you score a school (especially a perfect score) if you have not other experience? What would you give the next school if they are better? Why not wait until you visit all of the schools and then fill out the feedback b/c you can truly compare the schools?
 

SportPOD

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The internet can be a breeding ground for alot of misinformation. There are alot of forums out there that try to bring down the profession. One key thing to all of this is that you have to take all of thie information with a grain of salt. Because of it being a forum on the internet, we have no idea if the person is who they say they are and if they even went to podiatry school.

What I suggest and it has been alluded to in the above discussion is to visit as many podiatrists as you can in your area. Visit the podiatrist who's been practicing for over 30 years and see what he thinks about the profession and then compare it to somoene who's been practicing for less than 5 years.

Most people out there are happy with the profession (including myself:) ) but you always have the bad eggs who have to think that somehow the profession did something bad to them. Remember we made the choice to attend podiatric medical school, so work hard to make the most out of your choice!
 
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