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Schooling advice for MS

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oxyplay

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Hello,

I am 18 years old with a child on the way, and she will be born in March, just after my birthday when I turn 19. For the last year or so after graduating with a 3.3 GPA, I ultimately decided I would like to join the health profession. I love helping people, and I am a highly passionate person. I determined I would go to medical school however, because of my child on the way I figured it would be rather difficult to do medical school, whilst being a father. (Not worried about grades in college, I know I am capable). So, because I am a soon to be parent would I even have the time for medical school?

My thought process behind this is; if I am crunched for time to the point where I will not play a part in my child's life or a very significant one, would it be advised to become an RN with an ADN instead? Then afterwards, go to medical school? OR, just go straight in medical school?

A big factor into this thinking is that
1. I do not come from a place with money/ or anyone who would be able to help out
2. I need to support my daughter and partner (who is attending college to become a Child Psychologist)

I have no idea what I should do, and I would love some advice.
 

gamieg

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congratulations on your future daughter, hope everything goes well.

I think you should gain some realistic experience into medicine and see if it's a field you can see yourself following. that would include shadowing, volunteering, clinical exposure etc. there are many medical students with families who deemed it worth it to embark on that path, but it's a very personal decision for everyone and only you can really answer if it's "worth it" for you.

if you're concerned with the timeline and financials, especially with having a family, you could also consider PA or NP.
 

Espressso

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Just based on your post, I recommend going the PA route. It's only a two year program, a grueling one, yes... but after those two years you immediately begin making around 80-90K a year. This number begins increasing right away too.

Mind you, PA school requirements differ between schools and are not as standardized as med school requirements. Most PA schools require you to have paid patient care hours (as an CNA, EMT, etc.) rather than just volunteering. But you also need volutneer hours too (both clinical and non-clinical). So I would create a list of schools and figure out their specific requirements asap so you can get on that.

Overall, because you're young and are starting a family, I think going into PA school would serve you best, as it seems like time is a major factor for you!

Goodluck! And congrats on the daughter!
 
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oxyplay

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Just based on your post, I recommend going the PA route. It's only a two year program, a grueling one, yes... but after those two years you immediately begin making around 80-90K a year. This number begins increasing right away too.

Mind you, PA school requirements differ between schools and are not as standardized as med school requirements. Most PA schools require you to have paid patient care hours (as an CNA, EMT, etc.) rather than just volunteering. But you also need volutneer hours too (both clinical and non-clinical). So I would create a list of schools and figure out their specific requirements asap so you can get on that.

Overall, because you're young and are starting a family, I think going into PA school would serve you best, as it seems like time is a major factor for you!

Goodluck! And congrats on the daughter!
After doing some research, the PA route seems like an amiable one for me. Thank you for the advice, but I feel I would go back to med school eventually. And yes, thank you both for the congratulations!
 
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LizzyM

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After doing some research, the PA route seems like an amiable one for me. Thank you for the advice, but I feel I would go back to med school eventually. And yes, thank you both for the congratulations!


Do you have a bachelor's degree already? If not, are you attending college with the intention of eventually earning a bachelor's degree?

Why do you want to be a physician or PA? If you become a PA and are earning a reasonable income, would you be willing to sacrifice 7 years and about 400,000 in lost salary plus $120,000 or more in student loans to become an MD "eventually"? Again it comes back to why you want to be a health care provider and the type of work you'd like to be doing (PA's don't operate so the surgical specialties are out of reach but primary care and urgent care for sports injuries and minor injuries and infections are within the scope of practice of physicians and PAs).
 

WhittyPsyche

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Hello,

I am 18 years old with a child on the way, and she will be born in March, just after my birthday when I turn 19. For the last year or so after graduating with a 3.3 GPA, I ultimately decided I would like to join the health profession. I love helping people, and I am a highly passionate person. I determined I would go to medical school however, because of my child on the way I figured it would be rather difficult to do medical school, whilst being a father. (Not worried about grades in college, I know I am capable). So, because I am a soon to be parent would I even have the time for medical school?

My thought process behind this is; if I am crunched for time to the point where I will not play a part in my child's life or a very significant one, would it be advised to become an RN with an ADN instead? Then afterwards, go to medical school? OR, just go straight in medical school?

A big factor into this thinking is that
1. I do not come from a place with money/ or anyone who would be able to help out
2. I need to support my daughter and partner (who is attending college to become a Child Psychologist)

I have no idea what I should do, and I would love some advice.

Hi OP,

I had my first at 18, second in college, and will be matriculating to medical school this coming summer. Similarly, I come from a disadvantaged background with a spouse that was/is in college at the same time. Please feel free to PM me.

Do not get discouraged, you don't have to give up your dreams to be a meaningful part of your children's lives, and don't let anyone tell you different. If you want to be a doctor, you can do it and have happy, thriving children!


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
 
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Espressso

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Do you have a bachelor's degree already? If not, are you attending college with the intention of eventually earning a bachelor's degree?

Why do you want to be a physician or PA? If you become a PA and are earning a reasonable income, would you be willing to sacrifice 7 years and about 400,000 in lost salary plus $120,000 or more in student loans to become an MD "eventually"? Again it comes back to why you want to be a health care provider and the type of work you'd like to be doing (PA's don't operate so the surgical specialties are out of reach but primary care and urgent care for sports injuries and minor injuries and infections are within the scope of practice of physicians and PAs).

Correct me if I'm wrong or naive here, but I thought PA's could "specialize" and work with physicians in the OR and post-op realm? Talking strictly out of pure speculation as I never was a pre-pa student and have stuck with my pre-med route all through undergrad
 

LizzyM

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Correct me if I'm wrong or naive here, but I thought PA's could "specialize" and work with physicians in the OR and post-op realm? Talking strictly out of pure speculation as I never was a pre-pa student and have stuck with my pre-med route all through undergrad


PA's don't perform surgery. They may scrub in the OR and assist, close a wound, change dressings and make rounds on patients post-op but they are not surgeons.
 
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