rxkrafted

5+ Year Member
Apr 9, 2014
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I'm currently in my last year doing rotations. Debating on whether to apply for residency or not. Would it be better to work full time as a retail pharmacist AND per-diem staff pharmacist at a hospital i am currently working at on the side until I get loans paid off within 2 years or apply for residency? I am hoping to work full-time as a staff or clinical pharmacist in the future though. Just not sure whether working experience or residency helps? Thoughts?
 
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BidingMyTime

Lost Shaker Of Salt
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Oct 2, 2006
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Not to mention, once you get used to your paycheck, it will be real hard to chunk it to go back to a residents salary and hours. It can be done, there are some who do it, but if you are certain you want to do a residency, the best time is right after graduation.
 

Ackj

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Nov 25, 2008
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Not going to lie, although I really like my retail job, seeing the clinical positions sent out to alumni that are offering $20-25 more per hour plus shift differential is really tempting. Thinking these are probably Z's jobs.

I could certainly "go back" to the resident salary, since I'm still living like I did as a student and saving/paying loans with the rest. I'm just not sure I could go back to the work/projects/assignments/study routine, because I've definitely gotten accustomed to working 3/4 days per week and virtually no responsibility on off days.

Plus I'm probably not a very good candidate anymore with just retail experience since licensure.
 
May 26, 2015
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Pre-Pharmacy
Not going to lie, although I really like my retail job, seeing the clinical positions sent out to alumni that are offering $20-25 more per hour plus shift differential is really tempting. Thinking these are probably Z's jobs.

I could certainly "go back" to the resident salary, since I'm still living like I did as a student and saving/paying loans with the rest. I'm just not sure I could go back to the work/projects/assignments/study routine, because I've definitely gotten accustomed to working 3/4 days per week and virtually no responsibility on off days.

Plus I'm probably not a very good candidate anymore with just retail experience since licensure.
I was under the impression that retail pays more than hospital jobs. What area are you from?
 

KARM12

Super Member
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Apr 4, 2006
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I agree, if you are set on doing a clinical job, the quickest way to get there is via residency. It is much harder to find a hospital job out of school and to go back after working retails.
 
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MatCauthon

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Sep 15, 2008
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Job postings were for Pacific Northwest, which is apparently where the big $ is for unicorns.
I've looked around and I haven't seen that the Pacific NW is vastly above the other areas. What area did you look at, Seattle? California seems to have the highest from what I've seen. Kaiser is king. Most of the other clinical jobs are on salary and not vastly better than any better than retail.
 

Ackj

10+ Year Member
Nov 25, 2008
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I've looked around and I haven't seen that the Pacific NW is vastly above the other areas. What area did you look at, Seattle? California seems to have the highest from what I've seen. Kaiser is king. Most of the other clinical jobs are on salary and not vastly better than any better than retail.
I didn't look at any area, it was an unsolicited email to alumni without specific locations given. Didn't bother responding as I'm not looking to relocate, and do not have a PGY1 anyway.
 

BanBidil

10+ Year Member
Nov 26, 2006
188
5
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Pharmacist
Do the residency and go into administration and find ways to save money in healthcare. Get some IT work done. Healthcare has changed a lot in the past few years and the dispensing role wage will soon be close to a Technician. Not the mention the BS you have to take from people. Management, IT Admin Transitions of care is where it is right now.
 

radio frequency

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Dec 18, 2012
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I've been in SoCal for 4 years now.
That's helpful, and ultimately understandable. California wages are needed to keep up with California costs. What does retail offer in that neck of the woods? That would be interesting to know.
 

njac

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Mar 20, 2005
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That's helpful, and ultimately understandable. California wages are needed to keep up with California costs. What does retail offer in that neck of the woods? That would be interesting to know.
At the same time, the COL isn't that insane compared to other large cities that don't pay nearly as well.

I've done some job hunting nationally and have done the associated apartment hunting - rent is still at least $1400/mo for a decent 1 bedroom in a desirable area of any major city, even a more affordable one like Philadelphia, where the pay is 20-30% less.
 

xiphoid2010

10+ Year Member
Aug 23, 2007
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Texas
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At the same time, the COL isn't that insane compared to other large cities that don't pay nearly as well.

I've done some job hunting nationally and have done the associated apartment hunting - rent is still at least $1400/mo for a decent 1 bedroom in a desirable area of any major city, even a more affordable one like Philadelphia, where the pay is 20-30% less.
Well, just to play devils advocate...

California state income tax is around 7-9%. So take that out, $70/hr just became $64.
My mortgage + property tax + house insurance is less than $1800/mo for a 4 bedroom 3000+ square feet house in a top school district/well-off part of a major metro in Texas.

So factoring in those, the $70/hr would appear to have about the same purchasing power as high $50s in Texas.
 
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gwarm01

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Oct 7, 2009
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Well, just to play devils advocate...

California state income tax is around 7-9%. So take that out, $70/hr just became $64.
My mortgage + property tax + house insurance is less than $1800/mo for a 4 bedroom 3000+ square feet house in a top school district/well-off part of a major metro in Texas.

So factoring in those, the $70/hr would appear to have about the same purchasing power as high $50s in Texas.
Meanwhile, my mid-$40s in Florida just became even more depressing.
 
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xiphoid2010

10+ Year Member
Aug 23, 2007
2,950
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Texas
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Mid 40s?? Yikes.
That does seem low. I would figure Florida, another red state, to follow closely to what Texas is: ~$60 for retail, and mid $50 for new grad in hospital, high $50s for residency trained.

Maybe the poster need to gather performance evidence and ask for a raise.... which I notice females tend to shy away from. But if you want to be equal, then behave like one... document your praises and achievements, set an appointment (especially when your annual evals are due), and ask. The worst we management can say is "no". But if we think your deserve it (and we often do), we will fight for you, but give us the ammo (data) to so we can help make the case for you.

Remember, most major organization have set ranges to avoid inequity and internal conflict. HR doesn't care if you are male or female, they will go off of your eval and data (as they should). At the same time, please don't fall into the stereotype: if you don't see your male colleague taking off for sick kids or soccer games, don't do it without expecting to see it in your eval.
 
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