Maskchamp

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Jan 12, 2017
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I wasn't aware that a B2 was required. I know that it's definitely recommended, otherwise you don't learn anything or talk to patients, and you "have to" learn it. But it doesn't prevent you from progressing to the next year. You talk with patients in your 3rd year, and if a student can barely say 'how are you' after 2 years in the country, that's just sad, so don't be one of those people who are even in the 5th/6th year and can't even speak. B1 is enough though.

I did sit IMAT, while ago. Resources are Khan for review and BMAT books. Although it might have changed, don't know much about it now.

Yes, the medical licensing exam is abolished. It was honestly quite useless and served no purpose. However, the specialization exam still stands, and it is quite difficult. You don't have to take it; if you choose not to, you can practice only as a GP on call at various places. But you can't specialize until you take it.

For the UK: there is the PLAB for non-EU citizens, no matter where you got your degree, wether in the EU or abroad, you have to take it. Also, the IELTS need to be taken by everyone, even native speakers, which is quite an annoying exam. I know some native speakers and Brits who have failed it, so don't take it lightly ;)

Definitely much much easier to get a job in the UK. You'll get a job, the only question is where. Can end up in the middle of nowhere, or the best hospital in London. I'm not an expert on the selection process, but it's based on points. The degree is valid in all of the EU, but some countries need an extra exam to practice, same principle as Canada/US really. And you have to speak the language, usually at a B2 level. You can be the best doctor in the world, but if you don't speak the language, there is no chance, it's not even allowed. Even though many physicians and patients speak English, it will never be enough. I still have people asking me whether English is enough cause 'almost everyone speaks it'.
 

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
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Hello @Maskchamp ,

I am heavily considering going to medical schools in Italy, and still in the process of choosing which one I want to go the most. I"d really appreciate it if you could answer my questions:)

I know that B2 level of Italian is required in order to go into third year in Italian public medical schools, and I was wondering if it goes the same for private schools. Also, I was wondering if you've also sat for the IMAT test.
I also have a little question about Cura Italia which was implemented due to the pandemic! According to articles I've read, it seems like the Italian government has abolished the medical licensing exam in Italy. Would this mean anyone who graduate from Italian med schools can practice medicine in Italy without no further examinations from now on? Finally, I have a question about going to the UK after graduating from Italian medical school. like USMLE, is there a particular exam you have to write in order to practice medicine in the UK? and is it easier to get a job in the UK than in Canada or the US with a MD degree from Italy?

Thank you!
I wasn't aware that a B2 was required. I know that it's definitely recommended, otherwise you don't learn anything or talk to patients, and you "have to" learn it. But it doesn't prevent you from progressing to the next year. You talk with patients in your 3rd year, and if a student can barely say 'how are you' after 2 years in the country, that's just sad, so don't be one of those people who are even in the 5th/6th year and can't even speak. B1 is enough though.

I did sit IMAT, while ago. Resources are Khan for review and BMAT books. Although it might have changed, don't know much about it now.

Yes, the medical licensing exam is abolished. It was honestly quite useless and served no purpose. However, the specialization exam still stands, and it is quite difficult. You don't have to take it; if you choose not to, you can practice only as a GP on call at various places. But you can't specialize until you take it.

For the UK: there is the PLAB for non-EU citizens, no matter where you got your degree, wether in the EU or abroad, you have to take it. Also, the IELTS need to be taken by everyone, even native speakers, which is quite an annoying exam. I know some native speakers and Brits who have failed it, so don't take it lightly ;)

Definitely much much easier to get a job in the UK. You'll get a job, the only question is where. Can end up in the middle of nowhere, or the best hospital in London. I'm not an expert on the selection process, but it's based on points. The degree is valid in all of the EU, but some countries need an extra exam to practice, same principle as Canada/US really. And you have to speak the language, usually at a B2 level. You can be the best doctor in the world, but if you don't speak the language, there is no chance, it's not even allowed. Even though many physicians and patients speak English, it will never be enough. I still have people asking me whether English is enough cause 'almost everyone speaks it'.
 
Jan 1, 2021
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I wasn't aware that a B2 was required. I know that it's definitely recommended, otherwise you don't learn anything or talk to patients, and you "have to" learn it. But it doesn't prevent you from progressing to the next year. You talk with patients in your 3rd year, and if a student can barely say 'how are you' after 2 years in the country, that's just sad, so don't be one of those people who are even in the 5th/6th year and can't even speak. B1 is enough though.

I did sit IMAT, while ago. Resources are Khan for review and BMAT books. Although it might have changed, don't know much about it now.

Yes, the medical licensing exam is abolished. It was honestly quite useless and served no purpose. However, the specialization exam still stands, and it is quite difficult. You don't have to take it; if you choose not to, you can practice only as a GP on call at various places. But you can't specialize until you take it.

For the UK: there is the PLAB for non-EU citizens, no matter where you got your degree, wether in the EU or abroad, you have to take it. Also, the IELTS need to be taken by everyone, even native speakers, which is quite an annoying exam. I know some native speakers and Brits who have failed it, so don't take it lightly ;)

Definitely much much easier to get a job in the UK. You'll get a job, the only question is where. Can end up in the middle of nowhere, or the best hospital in London. I'm not an expert on the selection process, but it's based on points. The degree is valid in all of the EU, but some countries need an extra exam to practice, same principle as Canada/US really. And you have to speak the language, usually at a B2 level. You can be the best doctor in the world, but if you don't speak the language, there is no chance, it's not even allowed. Even though many physicians and patients speak English, it will never be enough. I still have people asking me whether English is enough cause 'almost everyone speaks it'.
Thanks for the detailed answer!

I thought it was an requirement, maybe it's not! I was also wondering if it's possible to sit for IMAT after getting accepted to private school since private schools have their entrance exam much earlier than the IMAT. ( I heard the HUMAT is in March and IMAT is in September) I'm assuming it is since you've taken it unless you took them in different years, but I just want to make sure!
Also, it might be a dumb question, but is the specialization exam in Italian? Would I need to take it if I wanted to specialize in the UK or is only the PLAB and a MD degree required?

Thanks again!
 
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Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
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Thanks for the detailed answer!

I thought it was an requirement, maybe it's not! I was also wondering if it's possible to sit for IMAT after getting accepted to private school since private schools have their entrance exam much earlier than the IMAT. ( I heard the HUMAT is in March and IMAT is in September) I'm assuming it is since you've taken it unless you took them in different years, but I just want to make sure!
Also, it might be a dumb question, but is the specialization exam in Italian? Would I need to take it if I wanted to specialize in the UK or is only the PLAB and a MD degree required?

Thanks again!
Yes, you can take both exams.
Yes, of course the specialization is in Italian. To specialize in the UK, you do not need to take it. Only PLAB, IELTS, and MD.
 
Mar 25, 2021
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I'm not sure if this thread is still active, but I am an American with a bachelor's degree in chemistry. It's way too hard to get into med school here, I don't have a good grade point average. I'm considering studying medicine in Italy, and then living and practicing in EU. I got a lot of good info on this thread, but kind of unsure as to where to start the application process....
I know I need to take the IMAT (or the HUMAT?) Sorry kind of confused on that.

Do I go to a medical school's website and find a link to apply? Or do I take the IMAT/HUMAT first?

I would prefer programs taught in English, but open to programs in Italian :)

Thank you!
 
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