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should i look into Dentistry as well?

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YNGBlackExcellence98

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i originally wanted to go into medicine (not sure what exact specialty). i'm still interested in medicine but i kind of got interested in dentistry after reading a novel about a black dentist who was also a civil rights leader. i like that dentistry allows you to have a good lifestyle, make good money, and be your own business owner(i'm a business adm. major myself).
 

rolltide15

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Honestly I would go towards what you can see yourself doing each day. Sounds cliche but don't go into it for the money at least thats my opinion. If you do apply they will ask you why dentistry in your interview and you want a solid answer to that question. I would shadow dentists and really get a feel about the profession before you make a decision.
 
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The.ToothFairy94

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i originally wanted to go into medicine (not sure what exact specialty). i'm still interested in medicine but i kind of got interested in dentistry after reading a novel about a black dentist who was also a civil rights leader. i like that dentistry allows you to have a good lifestyle, make good money, and be your own business owner(i'm a business adm. major myself).
Hey please tell me the name of the book.... I could use the inspiration. #BlackExcellence at it's finest

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YNGBlackExcellence98

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Hey please tell me the name of the book.... I could use the inspiration. #BlackExcellence at it's finest

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that's the thing i forgot the novel (it was a book about doctors in the civil rights era). i do remember the dentist though, his name is Dr. C.O. Simpkins Sr. i found his website and looked at his biography which was crazy. i'll post some info from his site on this post.

  • Dr. C.O. Simpkins, Sr., is a dentist, civic leader, and hero in the Civil Rights movement in the United States. Beginning in the 1950s, Dr. Simpkins focused on injustices facing people of color, with an emphasis on securing voting rights. To that end, he was founder of the United Christian Conference on Registration and Voting which helped him to support his efforts. He was also a founding member of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, serving with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Following high school, the young C.O. attended Wiley College in Marshall, Texas, and Tennessee State University, where he received his undergraduate degrees. He later enrolled at Meharry Medical College School of Dentistry in Nashville where he earned a Doctorate of Dental Surgery degree.
  • C.O. joined the U.S. Air Force, serving as a captain at Sampson Air Force Base in upstate New York. He was honorably discharged in 1951 and returned to Louisiana to practice dentistry in Shreveport.
  • A dentist by profession, Dr. Simpkins first practiced with his father upon returning to Louisiana. He later opened his own dental practice and became successful in his field. When not practicing dentistry, Dr. Simpkins used his free time to address the injustices faced by Black Americans, concentrating on voting rights.
  • Dr. Simpkins participated in civil rights activities and was closely associated with the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He invited Dr. King to visit Shreveport to draw attention to the cause. This and his other activities created hostility and harassment from many elected officials, law enforcement and racist organizations.

    His home was firebombed as was his office, and Dr. Simpkins was prominently featured on a death list created by local racist organizations. Fearing for the safety of his family and neighbors and unable to secure insurance for his home and dental practice, he made a difficult decision to leave Shreveport, settling in New York.
  • Dr. Simpkins and his family moved to New York where he could continue his civil right activities without fear of retribution. In addition to establishing a dental practice on Long Island, he continued his civil rights advocacy and also became involved in community activities. Using the organizational and civic leadership skills he had honed in Shreveport, he was active in the formation and establishment of the York College of the City University of New York which is located in Jamaica, Queens. York College has provides urban residents with greatly improved access to higher education resources since its founding in 1966 and today includes over 8000 students on a modern 50-acre campus.
  • After 26 years of self-imposed exile in New York and with a feeling of hope for the future, Dr. Simpkins returned to Shreveport. Shortly afterwards, he ran for mayor, winning the primary but losing the run-off in a very tight race. Undeterred, he subsequently campaigned for a seat in the Louisiana House of Representatives, representing District 4 from 1992 to 1996. During his term he introduced important legislation and was known for his ability to work with colleagues across the aisle.

    He continues to meet with groups of high school students across Caddo Parish, impressing upon them the need for community activism and expanding their awareness of local history against the backdrop of the struggle for civil rights in America.

    Dr. Simpkins retired from dentistry in 2011. He continues to be a strong community advocate, generously giving of his time and his resources. For example, he and his wife donated land for a community clinic to address health in an undeserved neighborhood, and that donation was the stimulus for additional clinics to support healthcare in other undeserved neighborhoods. He also speaks to students to educate new generations about the history of the turbulent Civil Rights movement.

http://www.cosimpkins.com/

 
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The.ToothFairy94

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that's the thing i forgot the novel (it was a book about doctors in the civil rights era). i do remember the dentist though, his name is Dr. C.O. Simpkins Sr. i found his website and looked at his biography which was crazy. i'll post some info from his site on this post.

  • Dr. C.O. Simpkins, Sr., is a dentist, civic leader, and hero in the Civil Rights movement in the United States. Beginning in the 1950s, Dr. Simpkins focused on injustices facing people of color, with an emphasis on securing voting rights. To that end, he was founder of the United Christian Conference on Registration and Voting which helped him to support his efforts. He was also a founding member of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, serving with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Following high school, the young C.O. attended Wiley College in Marshall, Texas, and Tennessee State University, where he received his undergraduate degrees. He later enrolled at Meharry Medical College School of Dentistry in Nashville where he earned a Doctorate of Dental Surgery degree.
  • C.O. joined the U.S. Air Force, serving as a captain at Sampson Air Force Base in upstate New York. He was honorably discharged in 1951 and returned to Louisiana to practice dentistry in Shreveport.
  • A dentist by profession, Dr. Simpkins first practiced with his father upon returning to Louisiana. He later opened his own dental practice and became successful in his field. When not practicing dentistry, Dr. Simpkins used his free time to address the injustices faced by Black Americans, concentrating on voting rights.
  • Dr. Simpkins participated in civil rights activities and was closely associated with the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He invited Dr. King to visit Shreveport to draw attention to the cause. This and his other activities created hostility and harassment from many elected officials, law enforcement and racist organizations.

    His home was firebombed as was his office, and Dr. Simpkins was prominently featured on a death list created by local racist organizations. Fearing for the safety of his family and neighbors and unable to secure insurance for his home and dental practice, he made a difficult decision to leave Shreveport, settling in New York.
  • Dr. Simpkins and his family moved to New York where he could continue his civil right activities without fear of retribution. In addition to establishing a dental practice on Long Island, he continued his civil rights advocacy and also became involved in community activities. Using the organizational and civic leadership skills he had honed in Shreveport, he was active in the formation and establishment of the York College of the City University of New York which is located in Jamaica, Queens. York College has provides urban residents with greatly improved access to higher education resources since its founding in 1966 and today includes over 8000 students on a modern 50-acre campus.
  • After 26 years of self-imposed exile in New York and with a feeling of hope for the future, Dr. Simpkins returned to Shreveport. Shortly afterwards, he ran for mayor, winning the primary but losing the run-off in a very tight race. Undeterred, he subsequently campaigned for a seat in the Louisiana House of Representatives, representing District 4 from 1992 to 1996. During his term he introduced important legislation and was known for his ability to work with colleagues across the aisle.

    He continues to meet with groups of high school students across Caddo Parish, impressing upon them the need for community activism and expanding their awareness of local history against the backdrop of the struggle for civil rights in America.

    Dr. Simpkins retired from dentistry in 2011. He continues to be a strong community advocate, generously giving of his time and his resources. For example, he and his wife donated land for a community clinic to address health in an undeserved neighborhood, and that donation was the stimulus for additional clinics to support healthcare in other undeserved neighborhoods. He also speaks to students to educate new generations about the history of the turbulent Civil Rights movement.


http://www.cosimpkins.com/

Okay I'm going to do some research to find this book. Good looking out

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stoopidmonkeycatdog

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We can always use more color in the field, good luck and hopefully welcome!

(Disclaimer: there's no hidden meaning in that statement, I love everybody)
 
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redhotchiligochu

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i originally wanted to go into medicine (not sure what exact specialty). i'm still interested in medicine but i kind of got interested in dentistry after reading a novel about a black dentist who was also a civil rights leader. i like that dentistry allows you to have a good lifestyle, make good money, and be your own business owner(i'm a business adm. major myself).
I'd recommend shadowing to see if you'll actually like the environment that dentistry entails. Not sure if you're still in school or have graduated, but definitely spend time at a dental office, talk to other dentists, and CALCULATE DEBT before you dive into it.
 
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