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Significant challenge essay topic

3.1415927

Full Member
2+ Year Member
May 10, 2019
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  1. Pre-Medical
So from what I've seen there are some schools that ask in their secondary essays about a "significant challenge" you experienced in your life and what you did to overcome and learn from the challenge. I wrote in my rough draft about how I struggled in my science courses in my first and second years despite studying really hard and how I improved in my third and fourth years by trying to understand the concepts rather than straight memorizing everything. For example, in orgo and gen chem I liked to memorize how to do the mechanisms (orgo) or the math problems (gen chem) but by the time I took physics I made sure to understand the reasoning behind results in lab experiments so that I can more easily answer questions requiring written explanations as well as math problems. I made sure not to come off like I was just making excuses, but rather talk about the flaws in my studying methods and what I did to improve. Do you think such cases about struggling academically count as "significant challenges" or should I find something more deep? I'm also not sure if adcoms might doubt my ability to succeed in medical school if I mention struggling in my courses in my first 2 years of college, even though I improved in the next 2 years.

Any input would be greatly appreciated, thank you!
 

Mr_Irrelevant

Extraordinarily average OMS-II
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May 20, 2019
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  1. Medical Student
Find something more deep. Essays are your chance to prove yourself as a human being rather than the numbers. Imagine being an adcom and reading another essay saying "I did poor, then I did good, because study". Was there any adversity during your time in undergrad? Are you a part of a minority group? Also look beyond the scope of academics. Maybe any challenges you've experienced in the work force? Best!!!
 
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3.1415927

Full Member
2+ Year Member
May 10, 2019
317
148
116
  1. Pre-Medical
Find something more deep. Essays are your chance to prove yourself as a human being rather than the numbers. Imagine being an adcom and reading another essay saying "I did poor, then I did good, because study". Was there any adversity during your time in undergrad? Are you a part of a minority group? Also look beyond the scope of academics. Maybe any challenges you've experienced in the work force? Best!!!
Hello! Thanks for your answer. Do you think overcoming nervousness (when it comes to public speaking) would be a good topic? Like if I talk about how standing in front of an audience often made me anxious but I was able to practice doing things in front of an audience by performing in talent shows and thus I became less nervous when it came to presentations/performances in front of a large group of people?
 
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  1. Non-Student
So from what I've seen there are some schools that ask in their secondary essays about a "significant challenge" you experienced in your life and what you did to overcome and learn from the challenge. I wrote in my rough draft about how I struggled in my science courses in my first and second years despite studying really hard and how I improved in my third and fourth years by trying to understand the concepts rather than straight memorizing everything. For example, in orgo and gen chem I liked to memorize how to do the mechanisms (orgo) or the math problems (gen chem) but by the time I took physics I made sure to understand the reasoning behind results in lab experiments so that I can more easily answer questions requiring written explanations as well as math problems. I made sure not to come off like I was just making excuses, but rather talk about the flaws in my studying methods and what I did to improve. Do you think such cases about struggling academically count as "significant challenges" or should I find something more deep? I'm also not sure if adcoms might doubt my ability to succeed in medical school if I mention struggling in my courses in my first 2 years of college, even though I improved in the next 2 years.

Any input would be greatly appreciated, thank you!

So from what I've seen there are some schools that ask in their secondary essays about a "significant challenge" you experienced in your life and what you did to overcome and learn from the challenge. I wrote in my rough draft about how I struggled in my science courses in my first and second years despite studying really hard and how I improved in my third and fourth years by trying to understand the concepts rather than straight memorizing everything. For example, in orgo and gen chem I liked to memorize how to do the mechanisms (orgo) or the math problems (gen chem) but by the time I took physics I made sure to understand the reasoning behind results in lab experiments so that I can more easily answer questions requiring written explanations as well as math problems. I made sure not to come off like I was just making excuses, but rather talk about the flaws in my studying methods and what I did to improve. Do you think such cases about struggling academically count as "significant challenges" or should I find something more deep? I'm also not sure if adcoms might doubt my ability to succeed in medical school if I mention struggling in my courses in my first 2 years of college, even though I improved in the next 2 years.

Any input would be greatly appreciated, thank you!
Introspection is a required trait for a doctor. Show that you have a life outside of academics.
 
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