dr.phoot

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This might be a little unusual to what's often asked around these parts, but how do you dress to work on a typical day?

I'm assuming on days you'll be performing surgical procedures, you wear scrubs.

I love the suit, tie, and professional style of dressing (mixed with classy gent). So I'm curious if there's a place for it in podiatry hehehe :D


Examples:
(taken from style forum)



 
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NatCh

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Embroidered scrub top and chinos in clinic, which would be entirely appropriate for this region. Central Oregon is a lot less dressy than the east coast. It would actually look out of place to wear a suit here. "Who's Dr. Fancypants over there?" "Must be new in town." Jeans and boots would not look out of place.

The surgery center and the hospital provide full scrubs to change into before surgery. You don't wear your own scrubs (and bring in external germs) into the operating room.
 
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dr.phoot

dr.phoot

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Embroidered scrub top and chinos in clinic, which would be entirely appropriate for this region. Central Oregon is a lot less dressy than the east coast. It would actually look out of place to wear a suit here. "Who's Dr. Fancypants over there?" "Must be new in town." Jeans and boots would not look out of place.

The surgery center and the hospital provide full scrubs to change into before surgery. You don't wear your own scrubs (and bring in external germs) into the operating room.
I didn't know that's how the scrubs work. I always see nurses in supermarkets and on the streets wearing their scrubs, so I figured you wear them from home.

So even when you were a resident, they were provided to you when you arrived at the hospital?

And yeah, I'm from NY so fashion certainly has its place here. I understand Oregon being much more casual with the jeans and boots. I couldn't imagine wearing jeans in a professional arena though. I don't even wear jeans at all actually. Khakis and chinos are my casual pants.

Thanks for the replies!
 

ldsrmdude

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Dress code for me is shirt and tie in clinic, I lose the tie for the wound center. I could do scrubs, but it's easier for me to just lose the tie and since I head home right afterwards, it isn't a big deal. If it was up to me, I would lose the tie all the time, but I guess that's part of the deal with being an employee.
 
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ldsrmdude

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I didn't know that's how the scrubs work. I always see nurses in supermarkets and on the streets wearing their scrubs, so I figured you wear them from home.

So even when you were a resident, they were provided to you when you arrived at the hospital?

And yeah, I'm from NY so fashion certainly has its place here. I understand Oregon being much more casual with the jeans and boots. I couldn't imagine wearing jeans in a professional arena though. I don't even wear jeans at all actually. Khakis and chinos are my casual pants.

Thanks for the replies!
There are really 2 sorts of scrubs, the ones you wear in surgery are not the ones that the nurses wear in the supermarket. Typically the scrubs you wear in surgery stay in the OR or hospital. A lot of people wear their scrubs all day, but then would change when they go to the OR
 
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NatCh

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When you go to surgery, you enter through a locker room where the facility keeps laundered scrubs. You get changed there, put on a head cover, put on shoe covers, then exit the locker room through a different door into a hallway with the operating rooms. Before you enter an actual operating room you put on a mask, usually by the sink where you scrub your hands and arms. Once inside the O.R. a scrub tech helps you don your gown and gloves.

Most health care personnel that you see around town in scrubs don't work in the O.R.

I can't speak for the rest of the people on this forum but I move around enough and do enough office procedures during the day that wearing a suit or blazer would be too physically uncomfortable.

Neckties and any garment, object, or jewelry (e.g., wristwatch, belts, cellphones) that you don't regularly launder *hypothetically* spreads disease.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121092749.htm

https://www.advisory.com/daily-briefing/2014/01/22/ditch-the-necktie-what-doctors-should-wear-in-a-hospital
 
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ExperiencedDPM

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I like to dress well and I spend a fair amount of money on high quality clothes, including suits. However, when going to work, I'm not going to Wall Street or the bank. What we do daily is very hands on, and sometimes there's blood, pus, drainage, etc. So I don't wear a suit to work

There have been many studies regarding ties harboring pathogens, and I believe that ties are actually banned in England regarding physicians wearing ties in hospitals. A tie isn't something you can toss in the wash or send to the dry cleaner after each use.

I always wear a white CLEAN lab coat with my name embroidered (it has my name and DPM, not Dr. XXX). I wear a pair of khakis or similar casual pants and a nice shirt. I don't wear a polo, it's always a "dress" shirt. I do not wear a tie or bow tie. I also wear scrubs with either our practice name embroidered on the chest or my name embroidered. I do NOT wear hosptial scrubs with the hospital name printed all over the scrubs.

Whatever you decide to wear, make sure it's clean, fits well and if wearing shirt/pants, make sure they're ironed and not looking as if you just rolled out of bed.

My pet peeve is crappy looking, sloppy shoes. We treat feet....spend a few bucks on quality shoes and make sure they're not all scuffed up, well worn, etc.

Dressing appropriately will not improve the quality of care you deliver, but it will improve the way you are perceived.

Just my opinion.
 
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FootAndAnkle

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[...] My pet peeve is crappy looking, sloppy shoes. We treat feet....spend a few bucks on quality shoes and make sure they're not all scuffed up, well worn, etc. [...]
I am glad I am not the only one with this sentiment. If there's one thing a podiatrist should make sure to get right with their wardrobe, I would hope it to be the shoes. I think it shows a healthy level of respect for both patient and profession.
 
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FootAndAnkle

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This might be a little unusual to what's often asked around these parts, but how do you dress to work on a typical day?

I'm assuming on days you'll be performing surgical procedures, you wear scrubs.

I love the suit, tie, and professional style of dressing (mixed with classy gent). So I'm curious if there's a place for it in podiatry hehehe :D


Examples:
(taken from style forum)



If I'm out mistaken, I think all male physicians at Mayo Rochester are required to wear a full suit and tie for clinic (and I know they have at least one podiatrist).
 
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dtrack22

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Central Oregon is a lot less dressy than the east coast. It would actually look out of place to wear a suit here. "Who's Dr. Fancypants over there?" "Must be new in town." Jeans and boots would not look out of place.
You do house calls at Alpenglow Ranch?