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Skip Writing Entirely?

Discussion in 'MCAT Discussions' started by Ibn Rushd, Jan 5, 2009.

  1. Ibn Rushd

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    What if one were to entirely skip the writing portion on the real thing? I've heard that med schools don't seem to care what the writing scores are, in fact, many adcom members don't even understand the J-T grading scale. What if I were to write one sentence, or leave the section completely blank? I could better use that hour to rest and/or get my mind ready for bio.

    Is this a dumb idea? Probably is. What do you guys say?
     
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  3. WashMe

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    dumb. i got a terrible writing score but nobody wants someone who is a quitter. at least give it a shot.
     
  4. Ibn Rushd

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    I'm coming from a different perspective. I don't think of it as quitting, rather, a better use of time. If such little emphasis is put on writing, and if it's merely an extra hour to tire test-takers before bio, then why not bypass it all together?
     
  5. bodonid

    bodonid Dr. Spaceman
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    I got an M and I don't think it hurt me, but I think the EXTREME ends of the scale (J/K,S/T) would affect your application. You'd have to be a moron to get a J.
     
  6. Ibn Rushd

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    Aaah, I suppose this is true. I was just tinkering with the idea. I really really hate writing. The whole thing would be so much better without it.
     
  7. J ROD

    J ROD Watch my TAN walk!!
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    I had a friend when he took the paper version put his head down and took a nap and rested up for the BS.

    He got a J and got accepted with no problem.

    I think it really depends on the schools. My instate schools could care a less about the WS.

    Personally, I wrote a little and got a L. I used the time to rest up for BS too.
     
  8. TooMuchResearch

    TooMuchResearch i'm goin' to Kathmandu...
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    Take your practice tests (including the writing sample) under timed conditions, and you should have no problems being too tired to take the bio section. :thumbup:

    It seems true that you can get acceptances without a strong writing sample score, but that doesn't mean you should aim for mediocrity. Plus, many schools have a research component, and research typically requires writing. I'm sure the schools wouldn't mind seeing that you are able to form an argument and express your ideas.
     
  9. Zona Pellucida

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    Bad idea.

    I wish the writing section counted for more... I don't mind writing essays at all.
     
  10. futuredoctor10

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    I don't think it is a good idea to skip this section entirely, unless you are certain the med schools you apply to really do not look at the score.
     
  11. parliamentarian

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    This is hearsay of course, but one my kaplan teachers whose in med school said there was a guy in her class that skipped the whole writing section.
     
  12. LaCasta

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    Just spend 10 to 15 min on each one
     
  13. SN2ed

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    As previously mentioned, the extremes affect your application. A very poor writing score will hold you back. Just a reminder, you'll be writing quite a bit during the application process.
     
  14. junkct

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    One of the purposes of taking timed practice tests is to build up your endurance so that you CAN make it through a 5 hour test with little difficulty. Will you honestly need a full hour of rest for the bio section?
     
  15. DrDre2001

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    A 0th percentile score might hurt.

    But i dont see a reason to try real hard on the writing section.

    I would say you should just write a little for about 15 minutes, without concentrating too hard and then use the other 15 min to rest. Thats what i did and was rested enough for the Verbal and Bio sections.
     
  16. swamprat

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    Verbal is before writing...
     
  17. DrDre2001

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    Oh true...i forgot... i took the test a year ago


    Then theres even less reason for the OP to rest a full hour for just the bio section.
     
  18. Doc Henry

    Doc Henry blowin' in the wind
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    I wouldn't totally skip it, but don't worry about it too much. I spent between 5 and 10 minutes on each essay and put my head down for a "nap" for the remaining time. I got an R, so it worked for me, but I have to admit that writing essays is easy for me to begin with
     
  19. amakhosidlo

    amakhosidlo Accepted
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    So...if a L or J doesn't hold you application back, what does a T get you?
    A gold star??
     
  20. lord_jeebus

    lord_jeebus 和魂洋才
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    Believe it or not, there are medical schools (although probably not many) that do care about your writing score.
     
  21. radon222

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    The first time I took the MCAT (paper and pencil), one of my friends was sitting next to me. He was in a 6 year program and just had to score a 27 on his MCAT. Since the school didn't care about the writing sample he just took a nap.

    From an admissions side, you might get questions during an interview if your Verbal was a 12 but you got a J. Generally schools don't care about the writing sample. However, if it came down to two students for the last spot and their apps were very similar but one got a J and one got a T, it could matter then. What are the chances it comes down to that??? not sure....
     
  22. PandaBrewMaster

    PandaBrewMaster w00tcakes
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    you should still do the writing section. It's really not even that hard...the prompt is the same thing every time just with a different quote. Spend even a meager 5-10 minutes writing and it should be enough to net you a 3 or so for each essay...giving you an N or something. At that point you're fine. Since the only way to get a J on the writing is to either, like you say, take a nap, or not know how to piece together coherent sentences, Its a much better idea to at least put some minimal amount of effort into it.

    From hearsay, I have hear that the writing score can actually make a difference. I think having an S or a T certainly doenst hurt you, and might be good company with a high verbal score. It might be because of other issues, but I have a friend who got the exact same MCAT score as me, except with a weaker writing section, and had a higher GPA than me, but didnt get an automatic interview invite to a school that I did which gives auto invites based on GPA and MCAT score. So either the school messed up....or the Writing section mattered. I dunno, but better to be safe than sorry.
     

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