Socializing as a pharmacist

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crazybob

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When you're done with school and out in practice, which types of people do you usually talk to and hang out with? Is it close friends you already had before you were done with school? Do you find yourself only socializing with certain types of people? Or are you usually too busy with work and your family?

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I am a new grad (C/O 2012) and will be entering the professional world of work this month. Though I have not begun working, I can tell you what type of people I would rather associate with: Other young professionals in various careers. Being a high-income professional as a pharmacist, I find that the best approach for me is to associate with others who are well-educated, have a relatively high-income, and are more professionally driven.

Unfortunately, we live in a world where social stratification is rampant and not everyone is on the same level/page or has the same status. I consider everyone to be equal in terms of human rights, but envy and disdain exist, sometimes without provocation or cause among people who may be on the lower end of the social totem pole. There may be envy and competition among those who make significantly less money and are not white collar professionals. Some of these individuals also may feel that the higher income "friend" or acquaintance should be the one who assumes the cost of drinks, dinner, and whatever else is part of a social event.

My thought process may come off as elitist, but it is far from that. But just like polar substances have an affinity for each other (water and alcohol) and non-polar substances also have a tendency to be miscible (think oil and gasoline/not oil and water), the same is true of professionals. Like attracts like. I would rather socialize with other very well-educated people such as MDs, accountants, other pharmacists, engineers, etc. Of course, I would never act pompous around a construction worker who makes $35k per year or the factory worker who pulls in $25k. I am more than willing to help such a person and lend a kind hand at any time. However, we would probably have little in common and I believe that to be truth- my truth.

I have a friend who is also a pharmacist and she somewhat agrees with me. She has hung out with techs on occasion and that type of gathering calls for an awkward situation; in many cases, the tech insinuates that he or she does not have enough money and practically asks if my friend could pay for a night out. There's a reason why professionals tend to marry each other: You have physicians and pharmacists pair up, pharmacists and teachers, pharmacists/engineers, etc. The rich also tend to marry other affluent individuals.

At this point, I have to make new friends because the overwhelming majority of friends from school have moved away and I don't have anyone close. I am 26 and do not have a family, so, hopefully, I will have time to meet like-minded individuals when the time allows. Most pharmacists work 40 hour weeks, which is pretty standard in the US and I don't believe should limit socializing drastically. But to each his own.
 
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Just came back from a holidays party with the other pharmacists and director from my hospital.

I like hanging out with my friends from high school (ego boost since I'm the only person with a doctorate). My best friend owns a hookah lounge so I hang out there a lot. But the best is hanging out with my sister since she has a lot of hot 18-21 year old friends. :D
 
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I am a new grad (C/O 2012) and will be entering the professional world of work this month. Though I have not begun working, I can tell you what type of people I would rather associate with: Other young professionals in various careers. Being a high-income professional as a pharmacist, I find that the best approach for me is to associate with others who are well-educated, have a relatively high-income, and are more professionally driven.

Unfortunately, we live in a world where social stratification is rampant and not everyone is on the same level/page or has the same status. I consider everyone to be equal in terms of human rights, but envy and disdain exist, sometimes without provocation or cause among people who may be on the lower end of the social totem pole. There may be envy and competition among those who make significantly less money and are not white collar professionals. Some of these individuals also may feel that the higher income "friend" or acquaintance should be the one who assumes the cost of drinks, dinner, and whatever else is part of a social event.

My thought process may come off as elitist, but it is far from that. But just like polar substances have an affinity for each other (water and alcohol) and non-polar substances also have a tendency to be miscible (think oil and gasoline/not oil and water), the same is true of professionals. Like attracts like. I would rather socialize with other very well-educated people such as MDs, accountants, other pharmacists, engineers, etc. Of course, I would never act pompous around a construction worker who makes $35k per year or the factory worker who pulls in $25k. I am more than willing to help such a person and lend a kind hand at any time. However, we would probably have little in common and I believe that to be truth- my truth.

I have a friend who is also a pharmacist and she somewhat agrees with me. She has hung out with techs on occasion and that type of gathering calls for an awkward situation; in many cases, the tech insinuates that he or she does not have enough money and practically asks if my friend could pay for a night out. There's a reason why professionals tend to marry each other: You have physicians and pharmacists pair up, pharmacists and teachers, pharmacists/engineers, etc. The rich also tend to marry other affluent individuals.

At this point, I have to make new friends because the overwhelming majority of friends from school have moved away and I don't have anyone close. I am 26 and do not have a family, so, hopefully, I will have time to meet like-minded individuals when the time allows. Most pharmacists work 40 hour weeks, which is pretty standard in the US and I don't believe should limit socializing drastically. But to each his own.

No no no.... your thought process comes across as a D-Bag.

"Just like polar substances..."
Really, dude? Really?
 
No no no.... your thought process comes across as a D-Bag.

"Just like polar substances..."
Really, dude? Really?

Relax, you are taking it the wrong way and losing sight of the big picture of my message. I knew this would happen. But are you going to tell me everything I said is completely false? Seems to be you can't have an opinion on these forums or you get attacked. Remember everyone's perception can vary based on experiences.

Example: I had a friend a few years back (until around my P1 year) who was a bright guy and we graduated from high school together. He dropped out of college and became a drug addict and tried to offend me on more than one occasion by stating, "you grad school kids have huge egos and are a bunch of losers". I didn't take that very well. So, what, then? Because he had nothing going for him as a result of his free will to make choices in life, was he resentful of my choices for trying to make something out of myself? The fact that I didn't drop him as a friend as soon as I was accepted into pharmacy school reflects that I was open enough to associate with someone who had no more than a high school education. However, things changed for the worse and I could no longer hang out with him as it was no longer a friendship and I started feeling as if somehow I had to justify my decision to move upward in life. This is only one experience I've had out of a few others. Don't tell me there's no element of truth to what I say.

And don't take one analogy I make and certify it as ultimate truth. Because there are many variables involved and experiences I've had and others have that you may or may not have. Ultimately, you don't know my heart or my thoughts. Do not judge me. Keep things in perspective. :thumbup:
 
Relax, you are taking it the wrong way and losing sight of the big picture of my message. I knew this would happen. But are you going to tell me everything I said is completely false? Seems to be you can't have an opinion on these forums or you get attacked. Remember everyone's perception can vary based on experiences.

Example: I had a friend a few years back (until around my P1 year) who was a bright guy and we graduated from high school together. He dropped out of college and became a drug addict and tried to offend me on more than one occasion by stating, "you grad school kids have huge egos and are a bunch of losers". I didn't take that very well. So, what, then? Because he had nothing going for him as a result of his free will to make choices in life, was he resentful of my choices for trying to make something out of myself? The fact that I didn't drop him as a friend as soon as I was accepted into pharmacy school reflects that I was open enough to associate with someone who had no more than a high school education. However, things changed for the worse and I could no longer hang out with him as it was no longer a friendship and I started feeling as if somehow I had to justify my decision to move upward in life. This is only one experience I've had out of a few others. Don't tell me there's no element of truth to what I say.

And don't take one analogy I make and certify it as ultimate truth. Because there are many variables involved and experiences I've had and others have that you may or may not have. Ultimately, you don't know my heart or my thoughts. Do not judge me. Keep things in perspective. :thumbup:

Alright, so let me ask you this... Where are your boundaries? Is an RN considered somebody who is "on your level."

Because you know what? You are nowhere near the level of MD, not even close. So don't even try to think that you can hang out with real physicians. Just like you, they KNOW that they're better than you.

And if you go into retail, don't try to hang out with clinical pharmacists. You won't be on their level.
 
Alright, so let me ask you this... Where are your boundaries? Is an RN considered somebody who is "on your level."

Because you know what? You are nowhere near the level of MD, not even close. So don't even try to think that you can hang out with real physicians. Just like you, they KNOW that they're better than you.

And if you go into retail, don't try to hang out with clinical pharmacists. You won't be on their level.

I don't have any real boundaries, Chris. Jeez- you really appear to take this so personally by how you write. I am willing to socialize and make friends with anyone with a solid education and not exactly rule someone out because they do not have a doctorate degree. But anyone with a bachelor's, master's, or professional degree is fine.

And in reference to your comment about MDs, I really don't know why you say pharmacists are no where near their level. You are practically making an idol out of them. Well, if you haven't figured it out, MDs, just like pharmacists, also hold a doctorate/professional degree. Are you making a God out of them because you have the thought process that all MDs make $300-600k? You are dead wrong: If you are glorifying them and putting them above the level of a pharmacist based on salary, think again. MOST doctors (and I know because I have several in my family alone) make far less than the figures above. Average is more like $180-$200k, not dramatically more than what a pharmacist working overtime can make.

As I said, there are plenty of them who are dating pharmacists or married to them. It's incredibly funny how you view them as Gods who are so far ahead of pharmacists when you forget that BOTH hold doctorate degrees and are equally as vital for the ultimate well-being of patients.

But back to what I was saying: RNs, and just about any well-educated person is fine. No boundaries.

Side Note: Those physicians who you believe think of myself as "higher-up or better" tend to be the older, ignorant physicians. In my family and from my experiences, majority of contemporary physicians are not elitists who look down upon pharmacists. Perhaps, you have observed the opposite- maybe you'd like to share your observations and/or personal experiences with your godly physicians?
 
Sounds like he'd be perfect for the awful company he'll be working for. An awful person for an awful company, and you are getting off as sounding elitist. No, 2012PharmDGrad I am not on your level, and I do not want to be your friend. Because I am friends with people from all walks of life and backgrounds. I have friends anywhere from people who are unemployed to people who are physicians.
 
Sounds like he'd be perfect for the awful company he'll be working for. An awful person for an awful company, and you are getting off as sounding elitist. No, 2012PharmDGrad I am not on your level, and I do not want to be your friend. Because I am friends with people from all walks of life and backgrounds. I have friends anywhere from people who are unemployed to people who are physicians.

You guys really cannot see the big picture. I NEVER said I would not hang out with someone who is not a professional. I have had plenty of conversations and/or interactions with people who are not pharmacists or those with minimal education. I simply implied it is much easier to associate with and find more commonalities with those who are similar, namely people in professional careers. There is a difference between the thought processes, mannerisms, and even ability to communicate when comparing college educated individuals to those with minimal education. It is not as easy to communicate about politics or other topics when the person has a limited education and therefore may not be as easy to socialize with. That is the central message.

Sure, there are people who have no degree or career and yet are incredibly articulate and intelligent. In that particular case, it would be easier to converse with said person about a wide variety of topics, but this is more of the exception rather than the rule.

As I said, I do not consider myself better than anyone else or believe that professionals are somehow superior to others. Society is interdependent and needs individuals from all walks of life. My message is that it is easier to associate with like-minded individuals who share a common background, in this case people who are career-minded and have obtained a higher education. I am not discrediting or somehow denigrating others, including the unemployed.

That is all. If you still disagree with my perspective and/or are going to insult me, I respectfully request that we simply agree to disagree. Thank you.
 
Of course, I would never act pompous around a construction worker who makes $35k per year or the factory worker who pulls in $25k. I am more than willing to help such a person and lend a kind hand at any time. However, we would probably have little in common and I believe that to be truth- my truth.

This is why you sound like a d-bag.

It's a cute idea, but what the **** does "such a person," need from you?

Your elitism doesn't stem from malicious intent, you just lack understanding of the wider world.

Edit: just read your last post it's fair, but original wording warranted the harsh responses.
 
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I am a new grad (C/O 2012) and will be entering the professional world of work this month. Though I have not begun working, I can tell you what type of people I would rather associate with: Other young professionals in various careers. Being a high-income professional as a pharmacist, I find that the best approach for me is to associate with others who are well-educated, have a relatively high-income, and are more professionally driven.

Unfortunately, we live in a world where social stratification is rampant and not everyone is on the same level/page or has the same status. I consider everyone to be equal in terms of human rights, but envy and disdain exist, sometimes without provocation or cause among people who may be on the lower end of the social totem pole. There may be envy and competition among those who make significantly less money and are not white collar professionals. Some of these individuals also may feel that the higher income "friend" or acquaintance should be the one who assumes the cost of drinks, dinner, and whatever else is part of a social event.

My thought process may come off as elitist, but it is far from that. But just like polar substances have an affinity for each other (water and alcohol) and non-polar substances also have a tendency to be miscible (think oil and gasoline/not oil and water), the same is true of professionals. Like attracts like. I would rather socialize with other very well-educated people such as MDs, accountants, other pharmacists, engineers, etc. Of course, I would never act pompous around a construction worker who makes $35k per year or the factory worker who pulls in $25k. I am more than willing to help such a person and lend a kind hand at any time. However, we would probably have little in common and I believe that to be truth- my truth.

I have a friend who is also a pharmacist and she somewhat agrees with me. She has hung out with techs on occasion and that type of gathering calls for an awkward situation; in many cases, the tech insinuates that he or she does not have enough money and practically asks if my friend could pay for a night out. There's a reason why professionals tend to marry each other: You have physicians and pharmacists pair up, pharmacists and teachers, pharmacists/engineers, etc. The rich also tend to marry other affluent individuals.

At this point, I have to make new friends because the overwhelming majority of friends from school have moved away and I don't have anyone close. I am 26 and do not have a family, so, hopefully, I will have time to meet like-minded individuals when the time allows. Most pharmacists work 40 hour weeks, which is pretty standard in the US and I don't believe should limit socializing drastically. But to each his own.

26 with a chip on your shoulder maybe. What you need is a dose of reality.

Someone's personality isn't completely defined by their level of education or what money they make. And when I make friends, it's because their personality and mine clique.

Maybe when it comes to dating, education and money are a higher priority...but friends?

Like with like can get boring really fast. You'll see....

Oh, and if I ask someone to do something with me, I offer to pay. I also pay when I know I'm in a much better financial situation. The money means nothing compared to good company with a good friend....
 
This is why you sound like a d-bag.

It's a cute idea, but what the **** does "such a person," need from you?

Your elitism doesn't stem from malicious intent, you just lack understanding of the wider world.

Edit: just read your last post it's fair, but original wording warranted the harsh responses.

At least you seem to have a better understanding of my message, based on my previous post.

Now, in response to what you highlighted, actually, there's plenty a person in the example above might need. One thing is financial assistance. For example, prior to pharmacy school, I worked as a tech and one of the pharmacists I was working with was very kind and altruistic by lending some money to a patient who needed the money to purchase some medications and medical supplies for a very sick relative. This patient barely made more than $8/hr and was practically crying at the pharmacy. The pharmacist, being the high-income individual he was took heart and helped that patient by lending some money to cover the costs of supplies. He provided a "helping hand" as I said in my first post to someone who needed it.

Not all pharmacists or other health care practitioners would do this, but this example demonstrates that someone who may not have had the same opportunities we have had may benefit from a helping hand. This is not about being a D-bag or about elitism. If I can help someone badly in need who may not have the same level of education, income, or who may be facing trials in life, I will do so. That is another tenet of my message.

Money is obviously not the only way professionals can lend a helping hand. The provision of knowledge is another way we, as professionals, can lend the helping hand to someone in need. Think about all the people who have never attended college, the high school dropouts, the hearing-impaired, etc. What might they need from us as professionals? Well, they might need our counseling services and ability to explain to them how to properly utilize their medications or clarifying a point they might not have understood when reading complex information. Your neighbor who may not be health literate may need your help in deciphering medical jargon that you can understand. I NEVER said that you can't talk to others because they know less or have less education. Quite the contrary, help people who might need assistance. That is what I said. And to reiterate, I also explained that it is easier to communicate with a better educated person. This is true. You may simply have more problems relating to and befriending someone with significantly less education, even for friendship. I really don't see how that is elitist thinking.

As I hope you can now see, this is what I meant by that bolded statement. None of this is about elitism even if it sounds like that in my first post. This isn't about being condescending or self-righteous. This is what I meant about social stratification: I believe in using your knowledge, skills, and place in society for the BENEFIT of society as a whole and to uplift others, not to act like a snob and look at others in disgust. I hope this helps clarify things.

Unfortunately, some of you seem to rush to conclusions too quickly and read too much into I'm saying. Like the statement about lending a helping hand to someone in need. Instead of calling me a "d-bag" or an "awful person", please refrain from petty insults and really think about what I am trying to say. It's truly amazing some of you folks are probably older than I am and have no problems hurling insults. Yet I am the young, mid-20s person on this site attempting to make reasonable explanations without trashing anyone.

Note: I can almost guarantee a criticism of some sort of this post even when I have tried to explain things. I am just waiting for someone to say that the pharmacist I worked with was a pretentious d-bag who tried to "show off" by giving a loan to someone. If that is the case, you guys just want to argue for the sake of arguing. :thumbdown:
 
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And in reference to your comment about MDs, I really don't know why you say pharmacists are no where near their level. You are practically making an idol out of them. Well, if you haven't figured it out, MDs, just like pharmacists, also hold a doctorate/professional degree. Are you making a God out of them because you have the thought process that all MDs make $300-600k? You are dead wrong: If you are glorifying them and putting them above the level of a pharmacist based on salary, think again. MOST doctors (and I know because I have several in my family alone) make far less than the figures above. Average is more like $180-$200k, not dramatically more than what a pharmacist working overtime can make.

As I said, there are plenty of them who are dating pharmacists or married to them. It's incredibly funny how you view them as Gods who are so far ahead of pharmacists when you forget that BOTH hold doctorate degrees and are equally as vital for the ultimate well-being of patients.

My wife's a pharmacist and she hangs out with anyone regardless of degree.

I'm an MD and I hang out with anyone regardless of education. Just last week I hung out with one of our registration people. And regarding your salary quote for MDs, don't know if I'm average but I am atleast double the numbers you're quoting.... And I have many colleagues who dwarf my income by six figures or a multiple of that.

Oh and I'm 30.

And reading yor post, you sound very elitist.
 
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My brother in law has a GED and never went to college. Somehow, despite his inability to communicate articulately, his lack of breadth of knowledge about the world, and his uneducated mannerisms, I still enjoy his company. And he has never asked me for a loan or anything!! Wow!!

Maybe, as a high-income individual, I should take heart, and ask him if there is anything he needs from me? To help him with the trials he may be facing in life?
 
You guys really cannot see the big picture. I NEVER said I would not hang out with someone who is not a professional. I have had plenty of conversations and/or interactions with people who are not pharmacists or those with minimal education. I simply implied it is much easier to associate with and find more commonalities with those who are similar, namely people in professional careers. There is a difference between the thought processes, mannerisms, and even ability to communicate when comparing college educated individuals to those with minimal education. It is not as easy to communicate about politics or other topics when the person has a limited education and therefore may not be as easy to socialize with. That is the central message.

Sure, there are people who have no degree or career and yet are incredibly articulate and intelligent. In that particular case, it would be easier to converse with said person about a wide variety of topics, but this is more of the exception rather than the rule.

As I said, I do not consider myself better than anyone else or believe that professionals are somehow superior to others. Society is interdependent and needs individuals from all walks of life. My message is that it is easier to associate with like-minded individuals who share a common background, in this case people who are career-minded and have obtained a higher education. I am not discrediting or somehow denigrating others, including the unemployed.

That is all. If you still disagree with my perspective and/or are going to insult me, I respectfully request that we simply agree to disagree. Thank you.

Your generalizations show how closed minded and shallow you are. I sincerely wish you luck in finding these relationships you desire.
 
I don't have any real boundaries, Chris. Jeez- you really appear to take this so personally by how you write. I am willing to socialize and make friends with anyone with a solid education and not exactly rule someone out because they do not have a doctorate degree. But anyone with a bachelor's, master's, or professional degree is fine.


when it comes to dating, education and money are a higher priority

what a pair of D-Bags
 
I don't have any real boundaries, Chris. Jeez- you really appear to take this so personally by how you write. I am willing to socialize and make friends with anyone with a solid education and not exactly rule someone out because they do not have a doctorate degree. But anyone with a bachelor's, master's, or professional degree is fine.

So... like, my uncle works for the local power company. He's "only" high school-educated, but he's really good at what he does. And he also has amazing skills in construction and has installed beautiful hardwood floors, built decks, etc for my family. Oh yeah, and he makes over $100,000 a year. But you're better than him, right, because our profession requires more formal education? Even though... weren't you unemployed for the past 6 months? So was I better than *you* because I had a job?
 
Who you decide to hang is a personal choice. No one should criticize the other because of differences in value judgement.

Don't tell others who they should hang with.
 
Are you in a circle with highly successful CEOs? NFL football players? Politicians? Movie Stars? Or, are you in a circle with Minority gang? High school geeks? Or do you hang out with your parents friends or grand parents friends?

I will go out on a limb and say most of you will say No.

That's how it is... birds of feather flock together.

We seek and hang out with with people of similar social status, educational level, and age group. Yes there are exceptions to every rule except for the proven laws of physics.

I won't go out of my way to befriend someone who has nothing in common with me...let's say a 15 year old HS boy who plays D&D. It's creepy.

But if I get paired up with him on a golf course, I'll go out of my way to kick his ass. But I won't say... no I won't play with you because you're a 15 year old dork.

In social gatherings, it's a plus to be able to carry on a conversation with anyone I have described above.

However, your close little circle of friends is a very personal decision that enriches your life.

No reason to call someone a douche because that makes you feel holier than thou.
 
When you're done with school and out in practice, which types of people do you usually talk to and hang out with? Is it close friends you already had before you were done with school? Do you find yourself only socializing with certain types of people? Or are you usually too busy with work and your family?

Close friends you have today are probably who you will hang with. If you don't have friends now as a pharmacy student, likelyhood of befriending close friends at work is less likely.
 
I honestly can't stand too many people around me. I live in one of the most God awful places ever. Land Rover in the driveway next to from me. BWM in the other. Benzes across the street. I'm pretty sure they think I'm a hired immigrant when I'm out there actually cutting my own grass. But I chose a house close to work...Middle MontBux, is weird, weird place, folks...kinda wish I lived in NE Philly or Norristown. More my people.

What happened to that one dude that posts on here rarely with Hendrix as his avatar who I had a multi page discussion about Eyes Wide Shut and other Kubrick movies with? That dude was interesting. Try finding people like that with MDs and PharmDs. Pretty damn hard.


I don't have a best friend. Honestly, I don't even think I have someone I'd call close friend. And I don't really care. I think I'm also going to start hanging out with more local soccer hooligans. They are pretty similar to me. Low brow people with disposable income who like cursing at Frenchmen on the other team. Love me some Philly Union.
 
Take SDN as an example.

We are all here because of one common theme. Pharmacy.

But I don't participate in all discussions. Only ones I'm interested in. Am I a douche because I don't respond to some people or retail threads? You may think that. But I don't have the expertise nor the interest. So if I'm a douche...then so be it.

Should I call you a douche because you don't post on NCAA football thread or clinical threads?

I should ... if I'm a douche for shunning some threads.

Social circle is no different.
 
Are you in a circle with highly successful CEOs? NFL football players? Politicians? Movie Stars? Or, are you in a circle with Minority gang? High school geeks? Or do you hang out with your parents friends or grand parents friends?

I will go out on a limb and say most of you will say No.

That's how it is... birds of feather flock together.

We seek and hang out with with people of similar social status, educational level, and age group. Yes there are exceptions to every rule except for the proven laws of physics.

I won't go out of my way to befriend someone who has nothing in common with me...let's say a 15 year old HS boy who plays D&D. It's creepy.

But if I get paired up with him on a golf course, I'll go out of my way to kick his ass. But I won't say... no I won't play with you because you're a 15 year old dork.

In social gatherings, it's a plus to be able to carry on a conversation with anyone I have described above.

However, your close little circle of friends is a very personal decision that enriches your life.

No reason to call someone a douche because that makes you feel holier than thou.

Good response to OP. I agree and agree with OP but his wording choice did seem a bit offensive. (edit: by OP i mistakenly meant 2012PharmdGrad, not Crazybob who initiated the thread)

Having lived in slums and low rent areas to complete pharmacy school, I have been the victim of classism and racism from people in the neighborhoods i've lived in. I dont judge anyone individually as friendship material based on their social status, but it seems more likely that as a high income earner, you will be judged and encounter some prejudice from certain less educated individuals or groups. Shouldnt stop anyone from making friends but it is a consideration.

I hang out with anyone who is cool or in my words is as laid back as me. At this point in my life I have more in common with techs than pharmacists, but I expect that will change as life unfolds.
 
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Considering the majority in the pharmacy are female, I will excuse them. But for the rest, there's no excuse for not participating NCAA football culture. Unless you went to Alaska undergrad... do they have football?
 
Take SDN as an example.

We are all here because of one common theme. Pharmacy.

But I don't participate in all discussions. Only ones I'm interested in. Am I a douche because I don't respond to some people or retail threads? You may think that. But I don't have the expertise nor the interest. So if I'm a douche...then so be it.

Should I call you a douche because you don't post on NCAA football thread or clinical threads?

I should ... if I'm a douche for shunning some threads.

Social circle is no different.


My buds from high school didn't go on to study academically. One is a butcher, one is an aircraft mechanic, one is a cop. The guys I play golf with don't have bachelor's degrees either and I have a great social life and friendship with them all. I don't ask them what their academic qualifications are yet 2012grad quotes
anyone with a bachelor's, master's, or professional degree is fine.
and RxLea quotes
when it comes to dating, education and money are a higher priority
, how shallow are these people?

One thing for sure RxLea will probably end up divorced within 10 years if she marries for money, that is if she finds a man who can't work out how shallow she is. My niece is a dentist and her husband is a train driver and they are totally besotted with each other. If RxLea wants to marry for money and not through love good luck to her but she will probably end up on the divorce scrap heap sooner or later :)
 
I am a new grad (C/O 2012) and will be entering the professional world of work this month. Though I have not begun working, I can tell you what type of people I would rather associate with: Other young professionals in various careers. Being a high-income professional as a pharmacist, I find that the best approach for me is to associate with others who are well-educated, have a relatively high-income, and are more professionally driven.

Unfortunately, we live in a world where social stratification is rampant and not everyone is on the same level/page or has the same status. I consider everyone to be equal in terms of human rights, but envy and disdain exist, sometimes without provocation or cause among people who may be on the lower end of the social totem pole. There may be envy and competition among those who make significantly less money and are not white collar professionals. Some of these individuals also may feel that the higher income "friend" or acquaintance should be the one who assumes the cost of drinks, dinner, and whatever else is part of a social event.

My thought process may come off as elitist, but it is far from that. But just like polar substances have an affinity for each other (water and alcohol) and non-polar substances also have a tendency to be miscible (think oil and gasoline/not oil and water), the same is true of professionals. Like attracts like. I would rather socialize with other very well-educated people such as MDs, accountants, other pharmacists, engineers, etc. Of course, I would never act pompous around a construction worker who makes $35k per year or the factory worker who pulls in $25k. I am more than willing to help such a person and lend a kind hand at any time. However, we would probably have little in common and I believe that to be truth- my truth.

I have a friend who is also a pharmacist and she somewhat agrees with me. She has hung out with techs on occasion and that type of gathering calls for an awkward situation; in many cases, the tech insinuates that he or she does not have enough money and practically asks if my friend could pay for a night out. There's a reason why professionals tend to marry each other: You have physicians and pharmacists pair up, pharmacists and teachers, pharmacists/engineers, etc. The rich also tend to marry other affluent individuals.

At this point, I have to make new friends because the overwhelming majority of friends from school have moved away and I don't have anyone close. I am 26 and do not have a family, so, hopefully, I will have time to meet like-minded individuals when the time allows. Most pharmacists work 40 hour weeks, which is pretty standard in the US and I don't believe should limit socializing drastically. But to each his own.
Your just 26 years old and right out of school so your ego(case/point why you hang out with the high school friends who make less than you) attitude is very common. Im telling you right now that if you only chose to socialize with people of your profession, you will miss out on meeting and getting to know alot of great and amazing people.

My first job at a pharmacy, our boss(pharmacist) was the complete opposite. He hung out and acted around his techs/interns just like other pharmacist friends. He came out to birthdays, get drinks at local bar after long day, invite us over to his house to watch games and holiday parties, etc. He built a close relationship with his tech co-workers and we came to trust and respect him and gave it our all at work. All of us were still in school and working on our undergrad. He didnt care about our income. He was just like any regular friend and until this day remains one of my best friends.

Your fresh out of school but once you get some work experience as a pharmacist, youll be more familiar with this. Get rid of that egotistical attitude or nobody you work with is going to respect you.
 
My buds from high school didn't go on to study academically. One is a butcher, one is an aircraft mechanic, one is a cop. The guys I play golf with don't have bachelor's degrees either and I have a great social life and friendship with them all. I don't ask them what their academic qualifications are yet 2012grad quotes and RxLea quotes , how shallow are these people?

One thing for sure RxLea will probably end up divorced within 10 years if she marries for money, that is if she finds a man who can't work out how shallow she is. My niece is a dentist and her husband is a train driver and they are totally besotted with each other. If RxLea wants to marry for money and not through love good luck to her but she will probably end up on the divorce scrap heap sooner or later :)

You play golf with those guys because they golf. common interest.
Your aircraft mechanic friend you hang with because you fly.

That's your personal choice. If others choose friends with educational requirement, it's their right to do so. Not your decision.
 
26 with a chip on your shoulder maybe. What you need is a dose of reality.

Someone's personality isn't completely defined by their level of education or what money they make. And when I make friends, it's because their personality and mine clique.

Maybe when it comes to dating, education and money are a higher priority...but friends?

Like with like can get boring really fast. You'll see....

Oh, and if I ask someone to do something with me, I offer to pay. I also pay when I know I'm in a much better financial situation. The money means nothing compared to good company with a good friend....

I agree with Lea.

I'll talk to and be friends with ANYONE. It's just friendship, not marriage so it's not that important. If someone is nice to me and want to be my friend I always accept that.

Hence the reason why I have so many folks on my Facebook account. LOL.

For marriage than PharmDgrad 2012 is right on! :) Marriage is very important and people with the SAME social class usually marry each other. A doctor will not marry a stripper or a high school drop out for example. The President's son will NOT marry someone that's not in his social class either. Sorry girls! lol...

Last note: Just because you have a college degree from a good college does NOT mean you are richer, smarter or better than anyone else! I can understand the HUGE ego...I was a student at an Ivy League college for 1 year....I use to think I was superior and SMARTER than everyone etc....then reality hit and I figure out I was no better than anyone. :oops: Lastly, for the love of God PLEASE understand this...There are people with NO college degrees that make more money in 1 year than you will ever make in your lifetime! So please STOP thinking you are better just because you have a college degree. Bill Gates don't have a college degree. The top ten richest people in the world are all Ivy League school drop outs!
 
I agree with Lea.

I'll talk to and be friends with ANYONE. It's just friendship, not marriage so it's not that important. If someone is nice to me and want to be my friend I always accept that.

Hence the reason why I have so many folks on my Facebook account. LOL.

For marriage than PharmDgrad 2012 is right on! :) Marriage is very important and people with the SAME social class usually marry each other. A doctor will not marry a stripper or a high school drop out for example. The President's son will NOT marry someone that's not in his social class either. Sorry girls! lol...

Last note: Just because you have a college degree from a good college does NOT mean you are richer, smarter or better than anyone else! I can understand the HUGE ego...I was a student at an Ivy League college for 1 year....I use to think I was superior and SMARTER than everyone etc....then reality hit and I figure out I was no better than anyone. :oops: Lastly, for the love of God PLEASE understand this...There are people with NO college degrees that make more money in 1 year than you will ever make in your lifetime! So please STOP thinking you are better just because you have a college degree. Bill Gates don't have a college degree. The top ten richest people in the world are all Ivy League school drop outs!

Actually strippers make more money as pharmacists. I have a friend who is a stripper and she makes like $250k a year.
 
Actually strippers make more money as pharmacists. I have a friend who is a stripper and she makes like $250k a year.

My point exactly! lol...People with no college degrees make more money than people with doctorates ALL the time. So stop thinking you are better just because you have a doctorate degree!

I had a friend that was a stripper too....I always thought she was cooler than me to be honest.
 
My buds from high school didn't go on to study academically. One is a butcher, one is an aircraft mechanic, one is a cop. The guys I play golf with don't have bachelor's degrees either and I have a great social life and friendship with them all. I don't ask them what their academic qualifications are yet 2012grad quotes and RxLea quotes , how shallow are these people?

One thing for sure RxLea will probably end up divorced within 10 years if she marries for money, that is if she finds a man who can't work out how shallow she is. My niece is a dentist and her husband is a train driver and they are totally besotted with each other. If RxLea wants to marry for money and not through love good luck to her but she will probably end up on the divorce scrap heap sooner or later :)

Lol

:D

seriously, I lol'd

Education is important to me in a relationship for reasons described above by others. I can't have a lifelong partnership with someone who does not have the education or intelligence to carry on a conversation about politics, social issues, science, etc.

It's a higher priority but not the only factor by any means. I think it's reasonable to consider someoneelse's financial situation. That does not equate to marrying for money. Who WANTS to end up with someone who doesn't have stability in their life nor the motivation to have it?

Prior to my current partnership, which is coming up on 7 years btw, I dated others from all walks of life-- an electrician, a chemist, a firefighter, retail manager...

Having something in common is what starts friendships/relationships but when it comes to friendship, I wouldn't decline to be someone's friend because they didn't have a degree :rolleyes:

For relationships, you have to consider other things and it just so happens that I have more in common with other health professionals.
 
Can someone tell me what the education process for a pharmacist is because in england u go to uni for four yrs when your 18 and then you work as a pharmacist. I am studying dentistry where we study as much as doctors so education wise there is a massive difference between us and pharmacists. Im only asking because the 2012pharmgrad guy sounded like he was very educated.
 
I took time out of my life to read this thread. I now feel stupid and I do not deserve any friends. Anyone who socializes with me is doing me a favor.
 
Can someone tell me what the education process for a pharmacist is because in england u go to uni for four yrs when your 18 and then you work as a pharmacist. I am studying dentistry where we study as much as doctors so education wise there is a massive difference between us and pharmacists. Im only asking because the 2012pharmgrad guy sounded like he was very educated.

Zelrond, in the US, pharmacists are doctors in their field. Most of us have 4 years of college/university beneath our belts followed by 4 years of study towards a doctorate degree at one of the many pharmacy schools throughout the nation. So, 8 years. Some people choose to do a residency afterwards, which is usually 1-2 years in length and can bring the total length of schooling to 10 years. I would say about 25% of pharmacy school grads decide to do a residency, but don't quote me on that figure as I could be incorrect.
 
Are you in a circle with highly successful CEOs? NFL football players? Politicians? Movie Stars? Or, are you in a circle with Minority gang? High school geeks? Or do you hang out with your parents friends or grand parents friends?

I will go out on a limb and say most of you will say No.

That's how it is... birds of feather flock together.

We seek and hang out with with people of similar social status, educational level, and age group. Yes there are exceptions to every rule except for the proven laws of physics.

I won't go out of my way to befriend someone who has nothing in common with me...let's say a 15 year old HS boy who plays D&D. It's creepy.

But if I get paired up with him on a golf course, I'll go out of my way to kick his ass. But I won't say... no I won't play with you because you're a 15 year old dork.

In social gatherings, it's a plus to be able to carry on a conversation with anyone I have described above.

However, your close little circle of friends is a very personal decision that enriches your life.

No reason to call someone a douche because that makes you feel holier than thou.

Its Z, I appreciate that someone (you) finally understood my perspective. You summed everything up, especially when you say "birds of feather flock together". I didn't use that exact phrase, but used another analogy instead and tried to explain things, but as you can see, it came off as elitist to most people.

Thanks for understanding. :thumbup:
 
Good response to OP. I agree and agree with OP but his wording choice did seem a bit offensive. (edit: by OP i mistakenly meant 2012PharmdGrad, not Crazybob who initiated the thread)

Having lived in slums and low rent areas to complete pharmacy school, I have been the victim of reverse-classicism and racism from people in the neighborhoods i've lived in. I dont judge anyone individually as friendship material based on their social status, but it seems more likely that as a high income earner, you will be judged and encounter some prejudice from certain less educated individuals or groups. Shouldnt stop anyone from making friends but it is a consideration.

I hang out with anyone who is cool or in my words is as laid back as me. At this point in my life I have more in common with techs than pharmacists, but I expect that will change as life unfolds.

type b pharmD, I'll give you that- my wording may have come off as elitist, especially in my first post. However, I clarified in subsequent messages and still had no luck. I appreciate that you understand my point of view, at least to an extent. The comment I highlighted from your text is exactly what one of my friends has experienced: judgments and prejudice from certain less educated individuals or groups. It has happened to a friend of mine and I have faced the same scrutiny simply from pursuing a doctoral level profession. For this reason, I happen to think it's a consideration in the people one befriends. But no- I am an elitist because of this and other considerations, according to the majority of people on this thread. :(
 
type b pharmD, I'll give you that- my wording may have come off as elitist, especially in my first post. However, I clarified in subsequent messages and still had no luck. I appreciate that you understand my point of view, at least to an extent. The comment I highlighted from your text is exactly what one of my friends has experienced: judgments and prejudice from certain less educated individuals or groups. It has happened to a friend of mine and I have faced the same scrutiny simply from pursuing a doctoral level profession. For this reason, I happen to think it's a consideration in the people one befriends. But no- I am an elitist because of this and other considerations, according to the majority of people on this thread. :(

Choosing words carefully is an important life skill.

I know what you mean about being criticized for pursuing higher education; I am routinely teased by certain members of my family about my level of acculturation.

I wouldn't want to spend time with someone who criticized me all the time either. You can't choose your family but you can choose your friends. But, if you go through life closed off to people who aren't well off or people who aren't highly educated, you could seriously miss out on some great connections and friendships.

Yes, birds of a feather tend to flock together but, for me, I try to remain open-minded when it comes forging new friendships.
 
I don't have any real boundaries, Chris. Jeez- you really appear to take this so personally by how you write. I am willing to socialize and make friends with anyone with a solid education and not exactly rule someone out because they do not have a doctorate degree. But anyone with a bachelor's, master's, or professional degree is fine.

And in reference to your comment about MDs, I really don't know why you say pharmacists are no where near their level. You are practically making an idol out of them. Well, if you haven't figured it out, MDs, just like pharmacists, also hold a doctorate/professional degree. Are you making a God out of them because you have the thought process that all MDs make $300-600k? You are dead wrong: If you are glorifying them and putting them above the level of a pharmacist based on salary, think again. MOST doctors (and I know because I have several in my family alone) make far less than the figures above. Average is more like $180-$200k, not dramatically more than what a pharmacist working overtime can make.

As I said, there are plenty of them who are dating pharmacists or married to them. It's incredibly funny how you view them as Gods who are so far ahead of pharmacists when you forget that BOTH hold doctorate degrees and are equally as vital for the ultimate well-being of patients.

But back to what I was saying: RNs, and just about any well-educated person is fine. No boundaries.

Side Note: Those physicians who you believe think of myself as "higher-up or better" tend to be the older, ignorant physicians. In my family and from my experiences, majority of contemporary physicians are not elitists who look down upon pharmacists. Perhaps, you have observed the opposite- maybe you'd like to share your observations and/or personal experiences with your godly physicians?

OMG I have not been active here on sdn but couldn't help myself. first of all to become a MD you have to have high gpa--->high mcat--->pass USMLE1--->USMLE2a--->USMLE2b--->USMLE3 finish at least 3 year of residency and many do 3-4 more years of fellowship.

to become a PharmD you apply to new school with low gpa pass naplex and you're done LOL the level of difficulty is not even anything compared to MDs give me a break! I'm a pharmacist in retail and I hang out with cashiers and stockers we play basketball and enjoy ourself. BTW you should get over yourself!
 
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I've met plenty of really smart people who earn a good living and have dropped out of college. I NEVER judged them. I don't think college degree defines a person, it's for some, but not for everyone. Just because you don't have a doctorate degree or even a bachelors doesn't make you any less intelligent. Heck, sometimes, I feel like pharmacy school prevents me from stimulating my brain just by often forcing me to memorize a bunch of irrelevant facts. I am glad I have school breaks to read newspapers, books, apply knowledge at work, etc. I plan to move away after I graduate but the answer to finding friends, I think, is a bigger city with a diverse crowd!
 
As the Op mentionned, he is a new graduate and he has not faced the reality yet. When he faces the reality, his opinion on how he sees the world will change drastically.
 
There is a difference between the thought processes, mannerisms, and even ability to communicate when comparing college educated individuals to those with minimal education. It is not as easy to communicate about politics or other topics when the person has a limited education and therefore may not be as easy to socialize with. That is the central message.

Sure, there are people who have no degree or career and yet are incredibly articulate and intelligent. In that particular case, it would be easier to converse with said person about a wide variety of topics, but this is more of the exception rather than the rule.

You're just wrong. You know more about pharmacy/science, and whatever you studied in undergrad. That is it. Don't kid yourself. Seriously don't.

You are massively generalizing about things you clearly know very little about.

"Birds of a feather..." sure...wonderful, but some of the comments like this little gem are going below and beyond, and the tone of thread is only debatable if you actually believe $4!t like this.

This is somewhere between dramatic irony and hypocrisy.
 
I dated others from all walks of life-- an electrician, a chemist, a firefighter, retail manager

I've met plenty of really smart people who earn a good living and have dropped out of college. I NEVER judged them. I don't think college degree defines a person

See, there is a difference between someone who works hard and is still earns a good living from the average dropout who goes back to mommy's basement to play video games. Lea's dating record may not all be BS MS PhD, but they are all something where you have to have some skills and knowledge, and you need to have discipline to show up to work regularly. Very different from somebody who got kicked out of high school and now works overnight at a gas station. Chances are a pharmacist will have next to nothing in common with that person, aside from maybe a sports team. Do you think you could have a meaningful discussion about healthcare reform with them? Probably not.
 
See, there is a difference between someone who works hard and is still earns a good living from the average dropout who goes back to mommy's basement to play video games. Lea's dating record may not all be BS MS PhD, but they are all something where you have to have some skills and knowledge, and you need to have discipline to show up to work regularly. Very different from somebody who got kicked out of high school and now works overnight at a gas station. Chances are a pharmacist will have next to nothing in common with that person, aside from maybe a sports team. Do you think you could have a meaningful discussion about healthcare reform with them? Probably not.

What about the person who works hard and earns a good living but still lives in mommy's basement playing video games when he's off from work? :smuggrin:
 
What about the person who works hard and earns a good living but still lives in mommy's basement playing video games when he's off from work? :smuggrin:

Well on its face that represents a big win financially and sounds like a leisure situation. But judging from the press out there, there is apparently a big outcry from the feminists! (something about not enough eligible mates?!) :smuggrin:
 
Wow...Everyone is piling on OP, but I do not think he intended to say what came out of his post. I think OP meant to say that most people tend to have better relationship with others who share their interest. That statement is true whether most of you like it or not.
 
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