Lucus

Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jul 4, 2001
78
0
Toronto
Visit site
Status
School of Dentistry to Offer Canadian Licensure Exam



Minnesota first in U.S. to endorse non patient-based licensure exams for dentists
The University of Minnesota (U-M) School of Dentistry will offer the National Dental Examining Board of Canada’s two-part exam, which includes both a written and a non patient-based Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), to graduates next Spring. The announcement followed the unanimous vote on June 26, 2009, by the Minnesota Board of Dentistry to approve the Canadian exam for testing the competence of U-M graduates applying for licensure to practice dentistry in the state. The decision positions Minnesota as the first in the U.S. to move beyond reliance on examinations that require applicants for licensure to perform procedures on live patients.

According to Patrick M. Lloyd, dean of the U-M School of Dentistry, the Canadian examination effectively tests the decision-making ability of dental school graduates in a manner consistent with the ethical principles of the American Dental Association and the profession.

Says Lloyd, “This landmark decision by the Minnesota Board of Dentistry about licensure requirements is in the best interest of the public. The non patient-based OSCE examination is a proven test of decision-making ability that avoids some of the ethical problems associated with a traditional patient-based examination. These include, but are not limited to, the potential for premature treatment; diagnosed treatment needs that are deferred until the date of examination; treatments rendered out of sequence; patients cared for by a provider who is not the provider of record; and follow-up care that will not be offered by the provider of record.”

In addition to successful completion of an approved licensure examination, Minnesota also requires that candidates for licensure graduate from a dental school accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation, successfully complete Part I and II of the National Board Dental Examination, and pass the Minnesota jurisprudence examination.
 

KinKs

10+ Year Member
Jan 21, 2008
404
11
Status
Dentist
This is an excellent move and hopefully more states and schools will get on board.

The ethical considerations for not using patient based exams are valid. I personally cannot think of a single valid reason to maintain the current system of patient based exams.
 

Lily143

10+ Year Member
Jun 27, 2008
39
0
Status
Dentist
So dentists who pass this exam will be licensed to practice in only Minnesota and Canada? Am I reading correctly?
 

SMCohen

10+ Year Member
Jul 16, 2006
418
2
Status
Resident [Any Field]
So dentists who pass this exam will be licensed to practice in only Minnesota and Canada? Am I reading correctly?
No, I believe that it's a separate (optional) exam so that Canadians in the US (or those that just want to practice in Canada) don't have to wait until they get home to take the Canadian boards.

This is fantastic! I hope Nova offers the Canadian boards by the time I graduate
 

monreal

Au pôle nord
10+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2007
356
2
Status
Dentist
No, I believe that it's a separate (optional) exam so that Canadians in the US (or those that just want to practice in Canada) don't have to wait until they get home to take the Canadian boards.

This is fantastic! I hope Nova offers the Canadian boards by the time I graduate
The announcement followed the unanimous vote on June 26, 2009, by the Minnesota Board of Dentistry to approve the Canadian exam for testing the competence of U-M graduates applying for licensure to practice dentistry in the state.

:)
 

tinman831

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Staff member
Administrator
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Dec 11, 2004
11,354
78
Texas
Status
Dentist
From what I read in the article, it states that you can take the Canadian licensing exam and be licensed to practice in Minnesota. This gives Canadians the option of practicing in either Minnesota or Canada.
 
May 12, 2009
17
0
Status
Dental Student
From what I read in the article, it states that you can take the Canadian licensing exam and be licensed to practice in Minnesota. This gives Canadians the option of practicing in either Minnesota or Canada.
But then again the Canadian has to take the National Boards Part 1&2 to be able to apply for licensure in Minesota.
Whereas the Minesota grads will have to take the NDEB to ger licensure in Minesota.

To get licensure in Canada you need to be a graduate from an accredited school + successful completion of both parts of the Canadian Board + an ethic and jurisprudence examination.

I know that the Canadian board wants to set up a test center at BU for next May but I do not know if Boston will recognize the examination in its State.

However, for having taking both examinations, I find the requirement to have both Canadian AND American boards somewhat stupid. To me, the Canadian board was a piece of cake compared to its fellow American, especially the OSCE. In no way does it "effectively tests the decision-making ability of dental school graduates".
 

mike3kgt

Hopefully scuba diving
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 14, 2004
886
8
Status
Dentist
Well, this would only be great things.

We had three students in my class who were Canadian who had to fly back to Cananda to take their boards. If we are in discussion regarding a standardized exam throughout the country, should we include Canada? Then again, is this a slippery slope? Would Mexico want to be in also :scared:

Minnesota students could only benefit from this, if DHATs become prominent or socialized dentistry takes over, you could always run and hide to your neighbor to the north and practice!!

If Cananda weren't so cold, I'd consider practicing there, it's a beautiful country!