Jun 3, 2014
9
1
Status
Pre-Medical
Hey everyone,
Just curious but has anyone who is maybe in med school/ residency now etc. ever experienced the "sophomore slump"? And if so do you guys have any advice on how to get over it/ find out how to make it better? Thanks so much
 

Conflagration

Avatar from MeluuArts of dA.
7+ Year Member
Sep 26, 2011
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May our friends from up north at University of Alberta help you out. This always cheers me up; I saw it in a pre-vet thread like a year or so ago. ^^
 

allantois

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Jan 27, 2013
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I'm kind of experiencing it now. But I'm also most likely at the point where things will get easier from next semester on at least as far as classes go :p
 

Make Or Break

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Jul 18, 2014
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I'm kind of experiencing it now. But I'm also most likely at the point where things will get easier from next semester on at least as far as classes go :p
Yup. Once I got all of the tough classes out of the way, I was actually able to relax a little.
 

HelpPleaseMD

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Aug 4, 2011
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imagine graduating college (w or w/o debt) with a useless science degree and no career prospects. if that doesn't scare you I don't know what will. :)
 

HelpPleaseMD

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Aug 4, 2011
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Why useless degree?
cause undergraduate science degrees are a dime a dozen and has very little translatable skills to the real work force, especially those who don't make the cut to med school. Guess you could go to grad school to do masters / phd and hope to teach at a community college?

point is dont let go of the gas pedal till you know your in and trust me it only gets more work intensive. looking back ... college is a joke :p.
 

moisne

5+ Year Member
Jan 7, 2014
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cause undergraduate science degrees are a dime a dozen and has very little translatable skills to the real work force, especially those who don't make the cut to med school. Guess you could go to grad school to do masters / phd and hope to teach at a community college?

point is dont let go of the gas pedal till you know your in and trust me it only gets more work intensive. looking back ... college is a joke :p.
Maybe if you majored in biology...
 

Omppu27

El Tiburon
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Aug 12, 2011
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I definitely hit a "screw this stuff" moment at the end of my sophomore year. I HATED the classes I was taking (gen Chem, gen bio, dumb GECs) and I HATED the volunteering I was doing (Red Cross blood drives and way finding at a hospital). Once I got over those classes and ditched that volunteering, it got a lot better.
 
Sep 14, 2014
32
7
Status
Medical Student
I had a second semester slump freshman year where I got a C+ on cell bio and a few B+'s. Honestly though the teacher was the problem. Anyway, keep your eyes on the prize and bounce back. Try not to let it get you down. Now I'm almost graduating med school looking at pretty good IM residencies and I'm laughing at the fact that I stressed a bit over a C+.
 
Aug 5, 2014
171
102
Status
Pre-Medical
cause undergraduate science degrees are a dime a dozen and has very little translatable skills to the real work force, especially those who don't make the cut to med school. Guess you could go to grad school to do masters / phd and hope to teach at a community college?

point is dont let go of the gas pedal till you know your in and trust me it only gets more work intensive. looking back ... college is a joke :p.
why so negative dude. since when is "hope to teach at a community college" the ceiling for a science career. lol

industry (biotech...pharma).... dental, rn, pa.... research... u got some options
 

bluejay456

2+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2014
118
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Medical Student (Accepted)
I had the exact same thing happen my sophomore year. Try some new study techniques, change your study environment, etc. It makes me cringe when people say they stopped being premed when they took 'X' premed requirement because frankly none of them are thattttt hard.

Also, I'm not sure how your program is set up but I know mine seemed very rigid until I took the initiative and changed the schedule around. Programs love overloading students with a bunch of the intro classes early but you don't need to take them in that order. I would recommend spreading out some of the more difficult premed classes and fill the vacated slots with distribution credit you need to graduate (since you can choose whatever these classes can be easier). Hope this helps and talk with your department advisor to see what flexibility you have in your schedule