jkjk5

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Nov 17, 2013
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What schools are known for getting a lot of their students into residency programs? Just wanted to see because I can't seem to find a lot of information on this.
 
Oct 24, 2012
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I think the general consensus is that you can specialize from most schools, but some schools are particularly renowned for producing a lot of specialists. Harvard, Columbia, UCLA, UPenn, UCSF are a few that come to mind. If you prowl around I think you'll find specialization rates over the past few years for many schools. Here are some stats from UCSF, courtesy of UCSFx2017. if you do search around and find any information, post the links and share!
 
Aug 21, 2013
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Well you have to take into account competition. The Ivy's may produce more specialists but you can bet your pretty teeth they had more competition for them. People who decide they want to specialize and are really gunning for it tend to gravitate to these schools with high specialty rates without really thinking about that crazy competition that's coming along. If it was me and I'm not really sure if I want to specialize or not, I'd say go to your state school if you can and work just as hard. Instead of 200 people competing for 20 positions. You'll probably have more like 15 competing for 2. statistically it's a better shot.
 
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jeffity

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Oct 23, 2009
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The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine School of Dental Medicine sure takes a licking on here.
 

mike ashley

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The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine School of Dental Medicine sure takes a licking on here.
Any school that combines dental and osteopathic in the same sentence deserves it. Furthermore, if they are going to do that, they may as well advertise their no specializing policy in bold letters on their website; could save people a lot of time.
 
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Troyvdg

Dentistry not Debtistry
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Jul 13, 2009
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Well you have to take into account competition. The Ivy's may produce more specialists but you can bet your pretty teeth they had more competition for them. People who decide they want to specialize and are really gunning for it tend to gravitate to these schools with high specialty rates without really thinking about that crazy competition that's coming along. If it was me and I'm not really sure if I want to specialize or not, I'd say go to your state school if you can and work just as hard. Instead of 200 people competing for 20 positions. You'll probably have more like 15 competing for 2. statistically it's a better shot.
Unless your state schools are UCSF and UCLA.
 

nahehes49

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Jun 3, 2012
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Well you have to take into account competition. The Ivy's may produce more specialists but you can bet your pretty teeth they had more competition for them. People who decide they want to specialize and are really gunning for it tend to gravitate to these schools with high specialty rates without really thinking about that crazy competition that's coming along. If it was me and I'm not really sure if I want to specialize or not, I'd say go to your state school if you can and work just as hard. Instead of 200 people competing for 20 positions. You'll probably have more like 15 competing for 2. statistically it's a better shot.
Statistically, this seems like a better shot but i feel like if you look at it as a whole, the situation looks a bit different. Yes for instate you may have 15 competing for 2, but if you expand this competing statistics nationally, it's a small chance. at schools like ucsf, Penn, Columbia, Harvard, they will still send more than 2 people to these residencies. I know Penn sent 15 people to ortho last year while some state sends 1-2.

Also, competition doesn't always have to be a bad thing. It pushes and challenges your classmates. I can only speak for Penn, but the students know that they can and will do well (general practice or residency) if they work toward it. because these schools are more specialty geared, I believe they give more opportunities for students who want it. (same with ucsf when I interviewed)

I've also talked to an aegd residency director and he didn't seem to emphasize grades too much. He said he did look at school names, among many factors. At the end, he just wanted some genuine people with no bs.

That's my current limited understanding and I hope to learn more as I continue my path down dentistry.
 
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Muggsy Bogues

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Apr 6, 2011
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Well you have to take into account competition. The Ivy's may produce more specialists but you can bet your pretty teeth they had more competition for them. People who decide they want to specialize and are really gunning for it tend to gravitate to these schools with high specialty rates without really thinking about that crazy competition that's coming along. If it was me and I'm not really sure if I want to specialize or not, I'd say go to your state school if you can and work just as hard. Instead of 200 people competing for 20 positions. You'll probably have more like 15 competing for 2. statistically it's a better shot.
...

...

...

Anyway, go to any school. Literally matters zero. Maybe less than zero. Anyone who says otherwise is trying to justify their outrageous Ivy tuition bill.
 

yappy

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Jul 11, 2008
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Reading this thread is like being in high school all over again.

"I'm going to be a dentist so I need to go to an Ivy or a highly rated state school. What's that? You're going to community college... lol good luck with that".

Years later most of the label whores never made it but have a **** ton of debt. Let the cycle repeat itself...

Standardized Exams > Rank > Grades >>> EC >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> School
 
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Dec 17, 2013
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Reading this thread is like being in high school all over again.

"I'm going to be a dentist so I need to go to an Ivy or a highly rated state school. What's that? You're going to community college... lol good luck with that".

Years later most of the label whores never made it but have a **** ton of debt. Let the cycle repeat itself...

Standardized Exams > Rank > Grades >>> EC >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> School
Actually, I disagree with that especially since this cycle is the first time there are applicants with Pass/Fail board scores.

Recommendation Letters > Rank/School, then from this pile of applicants the rest mattered.

This year there are many people who applied with pass/fail boards coming from pass/fail schools and what school you went to definitely mattered. I go to a school with a lingering poor reputation and meeting applicants on the interview trail will tell you a lot more than SDN.

This is only ortho. I'm thinking the rest have a ton more that will match from the ivys.
25 ortho applicants came from Penn, 2 didn't match. Penn took 4 of their own for their class.
Harvard had 8, all matched.
Columbia had 15 and majority matched.


Rank seemed to mean the most this year unless you went to an ivy league or if you matched at your home school. No one wanted bad apples in their program this year.

Going to an ivy-league and you are certain you want to specialize can only help you because you are not ranked/being in the top 20% and go to an ivy offsets being in the top 10%, the network of alumni in academia is huge, you will be in a class with many others with similar interests/goals which makes the learning environment more stimulating.
 
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HKBB

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Sep 8, 2012
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Actually, I disagree with that especially since this cycle is the first time there are applicants with Pass/Fail board scores.

Recommendation Letters > Rank/School, then from this pile of applicants the rest mattered.

This year there are many people who applied with pass/fail boards coming from pass/fail schools and what school you went to definitely mattered. I go to a school with a lingering poor reputation and meeting applicants on the interview trail will tell you a lot more than SDN.

This is only ortho. I'm thinking the rest have a ton more that will match from the ivys.
25 ortho applicants came from Penn, 2 didn't match. Penn took 4 of their own for their class.
Harvard had 8, all matched.
Columbia had 15 and majority matched.


Rank seemed to mean the most this year unless you went to an ivy league or if you matched at your home school. No one wanted bad apples in their program this year.

Going to an ivy-league and you are certain you want to specialize can only help you because you are not ranked/being in the top 20% and go to an ivy offsets being in the top 10%, the network of alumni in academia is huge, you will be in a class with many others with similar interests/goals which makes the learning environment more stimulating.
I think this is true as well. However, I think this also goes for schools such as UCLA, UCSF, and UConn. Or other schools that are P/F.
 
Dec 23, 2011
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Actually, I disagree with that especially since this cycle is the first time there are applicants with Pass/Fail board scores.

Recommendation Letters > Rank/School, then from this pile of applicants the rest mattered.

This year there are many people who applied with pass/fail boards coming from pass/fail schools and what school you went to definitely mattered. I go to a school with a lingering poor reputation and meeting applicants on the interview trail will tell you a lot more than SDN.

This is only ortho. I'm thinking the rest have a ton more that will match from the ivys.
25 ortho applicants came from Penn, 2 didn't match. Penn took 4 of their own for their class.
Harvard had 8, all matched.
Columbia had 15 and majority matched.


Rank seemed to mean the most this year unless you went to an ivy league or if you matched at your home school. No one wanted bad apples in their program this year.

Going to an ivy-league and you are certain you want to specialize can only help you because you are not ranked/being in the top 20% and go to an ivy offsets being in the top 10%, the network of alumni in academia is huge, you will be in a class with many others with similar interests/goals which makes the learning environment more stimulating.

This is anecdotal information so take it for what it's worth.

When I was a resident (very well regarded peds residency) we seemed to have terrible luck with the Ivy kids. Were they smart? Sure. However, there were some very alarming deficiencies, notably, the inability to diagnose decay on a radiograph. This is inexcusable.

Does the dental school matter? NO. However, make sure the dental school you attend will train you to be a DENTIST
 
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