Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
Hey!
While contemplating my future, I thought I would like to do sports medicine. I would like to do it for a professional team (NBA,MLB,NFL) and was wondering about the process. Is there anything I can do now to help me build up a solid resume so that I stand a better chance at those ultra competitive spots? What field should I do research in? Should I do internships in a certain place?

Also, could you guys tell me about the schooling? Is there any major in college that would help me later on? After med school, what is the residency like? How long is it? Are there any renowned places for residency? Is it recommended to do a fellowship? If so, in what area? How long is the fellowship?

Thanks for the help! I am really interested in this field, but don't know where to start
 

Caesar

In Memory of Riley Jane
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Sep 26, 2007
17,036
71
Midwest
Status
Attending Physician
I don't know how much you can do to help at this point but while at Uni if you can get onto one of the sports teams "managment" staffs or whatever they are called that would get you used to seeing that side of the sport I expect. some friends of mine did it, and when our bball team won they got rings too.
 

Caesar

In Memory of Riley Jane
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Sep 26, 2007
17,036
71
Midwest
Status
Attending Physician
the second part: Sports med follows Family Practice or ORS I believe. (surgical and non surgical). I think there are a few fellowships for it after EM too but I can't be sure. Maybe a current med student or resident will pop in to answer this part.
 
About the Ads

Depakote

Pediatric Anesthesiologist
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Nov 2, 2004
20,782
105
SOCMOB
Status
Attending Physician
Sports medicine can be done as a fellowship following multiple residencies including orthopedic surgery, family practice, internal medicine, emergency medicine, pediatrics, or physical medicine and rehabilitation.

In HS I shadowed the Team Doc for the St. Louis Rams, he was an Orthopedic Surgeon. I know a few other Sports medicine docs that are orthopods and at least one that came out of family practice.
 

MilkmanAl

Al the Ass Mod
10+ Year Member
Mar 23, 2008
12,024
70
Kansas City, MO
www.facebook.com
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I think you're correct. I believe you can also do a sports medicine fellowship after an internal medicine residency or just go straight into practice if you do Physical Medicine and Rehab (PM&R).

edit: Beaten by Depakote. Damn!
 

malfee

Sports Medicine Wannabe
10+ Year Member
Jul 28, 2008
169
0
New York
Status
Pre-Medical
Woo, another sports med. person! :p

As for majors you might want to look at, I personally am going to be studying Exercise Science/Physiology, and probably minoring in Nutrition. I think the major is near-perfect for anyone interested in Sports Medicine, but it depends on the school's curriculum. At Rutgers, where I'm almost definitely attending, their "example" coursework that they have posted for the major seems phenomenal to me (and it even includes the pre-med prerequisites).

P.S. - I briefly considered the major of Athletic Training/Sports Medicine, as it has the title of the profession right in its name, but it seems to be more focused on physical rehabilitation and treating common sports injuries rather than the science and physiological aspects of sports and exercise, which is something I find far more interesting.
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
Thanks for the replies! They brought up some new questions:
1. How do you get a position with a university or college sports team management? Who would I have to talk to? What would they look for in a possible applicant?
2. Does medical school prestige matter for a competitive field like this?
3. How long is the sports medicine fellowship?
4. @ Depakote: How did you get that position with the rams trainer? Did you know him personally?
5. Are there any renowned fellowship places for sports medicine? Something that is prestigious?
6. Will research help in getting a sports medicine position (like team doctor)? If so, what field should the research be in? Could I start that in college?

That's it for now! Thanks for your help
 

Depakote

Pediatric Anesthesiologist
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Nov 2, 2004
20,782
105
SOCMOB
Status
Attending Physician
Thanks for the replies! They brought up some new questions:
1. How do you get a position with a university or college sports team management? Who would I have to talk to? What would they look for in a possible applicant?
2. Does medical school prestige matter for a competitive field like this?
3. How long is the sports medicine fellowship?
4. @ Depakote: How did you get that position with the rams trainer? Did you know him personally?
5. Are there any renowned fellowship places for sports medicine? Something that is prestigious?
6. Will research help in getting a sports medicine position (like team doctor)? If so, what field should the research be in? Could I start that in college?

That's it for now! Thanks for your help
I'll answer as best I can, hopefully others will respond to the ones I don't know...

1.) You'll need certification. Athletic Trainers have their own certification and Sports Medicine Physicians usually complete the fellowship mentioned above. How you get the job? Not sure. Probably a mix of connections and a good resume.

2.) The most important place is the last place you were. In this situation it would be more your residency and your fellowship that matter than your school. I don't know that they'd necessarily need to be "prestigious" but it would need to be good training if you want to work for a professional sports team. The doc I shadowed went to a state school that would be very unrecognizable outside that state. Another note, being a team physician is not a full-time job. You'll attend games and care for the athletes but you'll have a practice which would be your primary source of income.

3.) I believe it's 1-2 years. Depends on the program.

4.) I was actually able to shadow the Team Physician, not the trainer. Now I didn't get to attend any sporting events, I just shadowed him in his normal clinical (and surgical) practice. This was actually set up through my dad. He had worked with one of the other docs in the Team Doc's practice and asked if I could shadow him. It worked out and I was able to spend the summer in his office.

5.) dunno. doesn't have to be prestigious for you to get a good job though.

6.) It never hurts to do research. Early on it helps to aim for the residency you'd like to do. ex. Orthopedic Research for Ortho-> Sports Med. You can do research in college but it's hard to get exposure to the subspecialized field you're aiming for. The best way to do this would probably be to talk to a doctor you've shadowed.
 

Terpskins99

Fear... The Stig
10+ Year Member
Mar 8, 2005
3,435
9
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Definitely pursue orthopedic surgery (to become an "orthopod") if sports medicine is what you're interested in.

These guys get all the best gigs. :D
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
Thanks for the answers guys! Depakote, question #1 was towards caesar, who said his friends had done stuff like that in college (although I understand where your coming from).

As for orthopedic surgery, how long of a residency and fellowship is that?
 

Terpskins99

Fear... The Stig
10+ Year Member
Mar 8, 2005
3,435
9
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Thanks for the answers guys! Depakote, question #1 was towards caesar, who said his friends had done stuff like that in college (although I understand where your coming from).

As for orthopedic surgery, how long of a residency and fellowship is that?
Orthopedic surgery is a 5 year residency. Though some individual programs require their residents to do an additional 1 or 2 years of research.

Fellowship for sports medicine is usually 1 year.
 

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
30
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Thanks for the answers guys! Depakote, question #1 was towards caesar, who said his friends had done stuff like that in college (although I understand where your coming from).

As for orthopedic surgery, how long of a residency and fellowship is that?

Hey Az!

I've done sports medicine work in college for two years now. I work as a student athletic trainer at school. This job DOES NOT require you to be a certified athletic trainer. For our school, there are two head trainers (certified) and then about 5 student trainers. They taught us everything we need to know regarding sports management and injuriers. We stretch atheltes, do preventive things like taping ankles, wrists, thumbs, shoulders, etc etc whatever they need. We ice them after games, we help out with rehab therapy duing ankle and shoulder rehab programs, provide help with heat packs and perform ultrasound if necessary. We are doing basically evertyhing an athletic trainer does. When there is an injury, we run out on the field as well, we just aren't the main ones that are diagnosing the problem. We work the games of all the sports (football, vollebayll, baseball, cross country, tennis, etc etc) and we travel with the teams on away games and work the home games. It may be different if you go to a large DI school, but I go to a small DIII school and thats how it works here. I knew about the job because I palyed football, so interacted with teh student trainers. When I quit football, I knew I wanted to get that job, so I applied and was accepted on to the staff. I hhave always been intersted in sports medicine and a lot of my ECs are dealing with sports med. I love the job and its one of the best on campus. I also get to work on Wed nights at the sports med doctors clinic, where the orthoepdic surgeons come to school and check out the athletes. So, you just need to inquire about whether this sorta thing is offered at your school.

As far as majors, I knew that my major was going to be Kinesiology before I even got to school because I knew that I had that interest in sports medicine. Its been a great choice and I have loved every minute of it. If its offered at your school, you might want to look in to that. Good luck!

EDIT: Like you, i also have been very interested in becoming a team doctor. Maybe onne for the san francisco 49ers...or a doc for the us rugby team, i dunno. But anyways, i have asked this questino many times to the physicains I have worked with and you just have to build connections with people that are already established with that team. If you want to do college for a specific team, make sure to do your sports med fellowship at the place that is affiliated with that team! For example Univ of South Florida has a brand new sports med fellowship. You can bet that those docs are workign with the USF football team and other sports teams affiliated with that school. So, if you have a team in mind that you want to work with, try and land a fellowship or resdiency in that area of interest where it is likely you will be working with that patient population.
 
Last edited:

malfee

Sports Medicine Wannabe
10+ Year Member
Jul 28, 2008
169
0
New York
Status
Pre-Medical
As far as majors, I knew that my major was going to be Kinesiology before I even got to school because I knew that I had that interest in sports medicine. Its been a great choice and I have loved every minute of it. If its offered at your school, you might want to look in to that. Good luck!
Oh right, I forgot to mention that Exercise Science and Kinesiology are pretty much the same major, so some schools might call it that as well.
 
About the Ads

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
Hey Az!

I've done sports medicine work in college for two years now. I work as a student athletic trainer at school. This job DOES NOT require you to be a certified athletic trainer. When I quit football, I knew I wanted to get that job, so I applied and was accepted on to the staff. I hhave always been intersted in sports medicine and a lot of my ECs are dealing with sports med. I love the job and its one of the best on campus.
Wow, thanks for the informative post! Would you mind listing or describing some of your sports med ec's (So I can try and do them as well :laugh:)? Also, what was the application for the job like? You just went and asked a trainer? or the athletic director? Also, do you get paid for it? If so, how much.


P.S. If your team wins, do you get rings? :cool:
 

Caesar

In Memory of Riley Jane
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Sep 26, 2007
17,036
71
Midwest
Status
Attending Physician
Hey Az!

I've done sports medicine work in college for two years now. I work as a student athletic trainer at school. This job DOES NOT require you to be a certified athletic trainer. For our school, there are two head trainers (certified) and then about 5 student trainers. They taught us everything we need to know regarding sports management and injuriers. We stretch atheltes, do preventive things like taping ankles, wrists, thumbs, shoulders, etc etc whatever they need. We ice them after games, we help out with rehab therapy duing ankle and shoulder rehab programs, provide help with heat packs and perform ultrasound if necessary. We are doing basically evertyhing an athletic trainer does. When there is an injury, we run out on the field as well, we just aren't the main ones that are diagnosing the problem. We work the games of all the sports (football, vollebayll, baseball, cross country, tennis, etc etc) and we travel with the teams on away games and work the home games. It may be different if you go to a large DI school, but I go to a small DIII school and thats how it works here. I knew about the job because I palyed football, so interacted with teh student trainers. When I quit football, I knew I wanted to get that job, so I applied and was accepted on to the staff. I hhave always been intersted in sports medicine and a lot of my ECs are dealing with sports med. I love the job and its one of the best on campus. I also get to work on Wed nights at the sports med doctors clinic, where the orthoepdic surgeons come to school and check out the athletes. So, you just need to inquire about whether this sorta thing is offered at your school.

As far as majors, I knew that my major was going to be Kinesiology before I even got to school because I knew that I had that interest in sports medicine. Its been a great choice and I have loved every minute of it. If its offered at your school, you might want to look in to that. Good luck!

EDIT: Like you, i also have been very interested in becoming a team doctor. Maybe onne for the san francisco 49ers...or a doc for the us rugby team, i dunno. But anyways, i have asked this questino many times to the physicains I have worked with and you just have to build connections with people that are already established with that team. If you want to do college for a specific team, make sure to do your sports med fellowship at the place that is affiliated with that team! For example Univ of South Florida has a brand new sports med fellowship. You can bet that those docs are workign with the USF football team and other sports teams affiliated with that school. So, if you have a team in mind that you want to work with, try and land a fellowship or resdiency in that area of interest where it is likely you will be working with that patient population.
It was the same at the D1 school I am talking about.
 

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
30
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Wow, thanks for the informative post! Would you mind listing or describing some of your sports med ec's (So I can try and do them as well :laugh:)? Also, what was the application for the job like? You just went and asked a trainer? or the athletic director? Also, do you get paid for it? If so, how much.


P.S. If your team wins, do you get rings? :cool:
Ive just done a lot of shadowing with orthopedic surgeons in sports medicine, as well as family practice sports med docs. Ive worked with them at football games and basketball games and what not. Ive also done some resaerch in orthopedic surgery/sports medicine at UCSD. I worked in a biomechanics lab. Lastly, as I already mentioned, Ive done two years of athletic training at my school. (ps this stuff is all on my mdapps page)

The application wasn't too detailed. I honestly dont even remember what was on it. I knew the athletic trainers before I started because as I played football, so interacted with them on a dialy basis. I was also good friends with a few of the trainers who were graduating, so they put in a good word for me.Obviously, they probably are going to prefer students who are intersted in sports medicine eg kinesiology majors or exercise physiology majors, but at least at my school thats not a must have criteria. I work with students who are history and econ majors. So, as long as you show an interest in the job, you should be fine.

Yes, I get paid. I have a work study from my school. I think i get paid about 9 bucks an hour, so not too shabby. Its a lot of fun!

Our football team has won league championshiops 4 of the last 5 years...unfortunately the only time I received a ring/watch was when I was on the team. The trainers don't get anything. Although, they do hook it up and give us these sweet windbreakers that say Occidental College Sports Medicine.
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
If I wanted to be a sports doctor for a NFL team, would it help for me to get a internship with a NFL team now? The internship would be like making phone calls and stuff, but would that make any impact for my career in the future?
 

MilkmanAl

Al the Ass Mod
10+ Year Member
Mar 23, 2008
12,024
70
Kansas City, MO
www.facebook.com
Status
Resident [Any Field]
That sounds like a fantastic job, but everyone else interested in sports medicine probably thinks so, too. That is, it's probably extremely difficult to work for an NFL team. Getting involved now and making some connections would definitely be to your advantage.
 

aecuenca2

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Aug 29, 2002
73
3
www.do2004.com
Status
Attending Physician
Ive just done a lot of shadowing with orthopedic surgeons in sports medicine, as well as family practice sports med docs. Ive worked with them at football games and basketball games and what not. Ive also done some resaerch in orthopedic surgery/sports medicine at UCSD. I worked in a biomechanics lab. Lastly, as I already mentioned, Ive done two years of athletic training at my school. (ps this stuff is all on my mdapps page)

The application wasn't too detailed. I honestly dont even remember what was on it. I knew the athletic trainers before I started because as I played football, so interacted with them on a dialy basis. I was also good friends with a few of the trainers who were graduating, so they put in a good word for me.Obviously, they probably are going to prefer students who are intersted in sports medicine eg kinesiology majors or exercise physiology majors, but at least at my school thats not a must have criteria. I work with students who are history and econ majors. So, as long as you show an interest in the job, you should be fine.

Yes, I get paid. I have a work study from my school. I think i get paid about 9 bucks an hour, so not too shabby. Its a lot of fun!

Our football team has won league championshiops 4 of the last 5 years...unfortunately the only time I received a ring/watch was when I was on the team. The trainers don't get anything. Although, they do hook it up and give us these sweet windbreakers that say Occidental College Sports Medicine.

You know ryserr, I knew you had sports med experience, but you have a great deal more than I thought. Sounds like you are on your way (assuming you do the same in med school and residency) to landing a fellowship of your choice. AC
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
What are some highly renowned residencies for sports medicine?
 
About the Ads

jkjkjk

10+ Year Member
May 13, 2008
37
1
Status
I think Rush Medical School has a pretty famous sports medicine fellowship. They're also the team doctors for Chicago Bulls and the Chicago White Sox.
 

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
30
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
You know ryserr, I knew you had sports med experience, but you have a great deal more than I thought. Sounds like you are on your way (assuming you do the same in med school and residency) to landing a fellowship of your choice. AC
Thanks for the encouraging words AC!
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
For residency, you guys said that I could do a residency in orthopedics or internal medicine. How competitive are these fields? Which residencies are "prestigious"? And what are the average step 1, 2 scores as well as number of research pubs that typical successful applicants have? I know most of them must have AOA, so I'm wondering about these things. Thanks for your help!
 

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
30
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
For residency, you guys said that I could do a residency in orthopedics or internal medicine. How competitive are these fields? Which residencies are "prestigious"? And what are the average step 1, 2 scores as well as number of research pubs that typical successful applicants have? I know most of them must have AOA, so I'm wondering about these things. Thanks for your help!

Orthopedic surgery is one of the most competitive specialites to get in to. According to the 2007 NRMP data, it has the 6th highest USMLE Step 1 score average (234) out of all the specialties. It has the first highest step 1 score for specialties that will lead you to sports medicine. In comparison, internal medicine has an average step 1 score of 221. I think the average score for step 1 is about a 220 for all US med students. You can see this data on page 16 of this link.

Other pathways to sports medicine include PM&R, which has a average step 1 score of 208. Family medicine, which has an average score of 209. Emergency medicine, which has a average score of 221.

You can find all of the info you need regarding match statistics at www.nrmp.org
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
I got an internship today with a physical rehabilitation clinic in my area. First step into seeing if this is what I want to do...
 

malfee

Sports Medicine Wannabe
10+ Year Member
Jul 28, 2008
169
0
New York
Status
Pre-Medical
There's actually an Orthopedic/Sports Medicine facility (a pretty nice one too) in my city that I recently visited for my shoulder (torn ligament in my AC joint), and I really would love to intern there, maybe towards the end of the school year. The doctor I saw was extremely personable.
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
Doing this would probably help in getting jobs in college and other opportunity as well.
 

kdburton

Ulnar Deviant
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Sep 3, 2005
1,978
4
Status
Resident [Any Field]
What are some highly renowned residencies for sports medicine?
While its great to be enthousiastic and set high goals for yourself, at this point you should really be focusing on getting into college (if you're not there already), and then doing well in college so you can get into medical school. Once that happens then you can start focusing on doing very well in medical school and on the boards so you can get an ortho residency spot. Towards the end of your residency (this would be over a decade away from now for you), then you can determine how competitve you are for prestigious fellowships. The fact that its so far off time-wise means that things may be vastly different then than they are now as far as what programs are there to begin with and what ones produce the best sports med docs.
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
While its great to be enthousiastic and set high goals for yourself, at this point you should really be focusing on getting into college (if you're not there already), and then doing well in college so you can get into medical school. Once that happens then you can start focusing on doing very well in medical school and on the boards so you can get an ortho residency spot. Towards the end of your residency (this would be over a decade away from now for you), then you can determine how competitve you are for prestigious fellowships. The fact that its so far off time-wise means that things may be vastly different then than they are now as far as what programs are there to begin with and what ones produce the best sports med docs.
I understand what your saying, but I have to disagree. By no means am I committing to this field or something, I'm trying to find out as much as possible to see if its a possible choice. I've gotten into 2 decent colleges already, so that's one thing that's knocked out. Most likely if I don't like my internships and my shadowing, I am not going to go into this field. But I want to learn about it.
 
About the Ads

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
I was wondering, which of the following schools are best for students matching into competitive residencies, like Ortho, Derm, and rad/onc?

Dartmouth
NYU
Albany Medical College
Stony Brook
Suny Downstate
Suny Buffalo
Thomas Jefferson Medical School

Could someone make a list of them from best residency matching to the worst?
 

kdburton

Ulnar Deviant
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Sep 3, 2005
1,978
4
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I was wondering, which of the following schools are best for students matching into competitive residencies, like Ortho, Derm, and rad/onc?

Dartmouth
NYU
Albany Medical College
Stony Brook
Suny Downstate
Suny Buffalo
Thomas Jefferson Medical School

Could someone make a list of them from best residency matching to the worst?
The ranking probably depends on each individual specialty. If I were you I'd just go to the school's websites and search for "Match List." A quick search of NYU's website revealed: http://www.med.nyu.edu/registrar/clinical/matchlist2007.html

You can take a look and see how many people matched into each of those specialties and try to decide for yourself, but the truth is that the numbers may simply be due to the fact that more or less peopel from that specific school were interested in a certain specialty than they were at another school. Here's Buffalo's: http://www.smbs.buffalo.edu/ome/ome_resources_match.shtml
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
What other ways can I spend time to see if sports medicine is right for me? Where else should I try and intern or volunteer? who should I try and shadow?
 

dragonfly99

10+ Year Member
May 15, 2008
5,092
54
Status
Attending Physician
Hi. Medicine fellow here. I just wanted to correct an inaccuracy in this thread.
Internal medicine has gotten rid of (or is in the process of getting rid of) the option to do sports medicine fellowships. I think it was decided just to not do this any more, and I'm assuming there wasn't money in it. Also, some said there wasn't much interest. To be honest, IM residency wouldn't be much of a preparation for doing sports med either...most of our patients are old, decrepit and not athletic.

If you want to be the team doc for a pro sports team, then orthopedic surgery is by far the best pathway. I have seen some team docs @the high school and college level who are pediatric, ER or family practice docs. One can do a sports med fellowship (I think they are all 1-2 years) from either pediatrics, ER or family practice residencies. Pediatrics and family practice are 3 year residencies, then you'd have to do the fellowship after that. ER is 3-4 years, then you'd have to do the fellowship after that. I didn't know one could do sports medicine after a physical medicine/rehab residency, so that is interesting.

As far as trying to rank med schools at this point in terms of your ability to get into sports med fellowship from one, I would not recommend that. For one thing, it's going to be 13 years from now when you apply for a sports med fellowship (assuming you are a high school senior) and things might change a lot by then. All those are solid medical schools. Being from a famous medical school (like NYU) and/or just one with a well known orthopedic surgery department, would probably be somewhat helpful, but only if you still make it into the top of your class.

Your ideas of doing internships, etc. are great, though. It's always good for the resume and helps you learn about what you'd want for your future career.
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
Hi. Medicine fellow here. I just wanted to correct an inaccuracy in this thread.
Internal medicine has gotten rid of (or is in the process of getting rid of) the option to do sports medicine fellowships. I think it was decided just to not do this any more, and I'm assuming there wasn't money in it. Also, some said there wasn't much interest. To be honest, IM residency wouldn't be much of a preparation for doing sports med either...most of our patients are old, decrepit and not athletic.

If you want to be the team doc for a pro sports team, then orthopedic surgery is by far the best pathway. I have seen some team docs @the high school and college level who are pediatric, ER or family practice docs. One can do a sports med fellowship (I think they are all 1-2 years) from either pediatrics, ER or family practice residencies. Pediatrics and family practice are 3 year residencies, then you'd have to do the fellowship after that. ER is 3-4 years, then you'd have to do the fellowship after that. I didn't know one could do sports medicine after a physical medicine/rehab residency, so that is interesting.

As far as trying to rank med schools at this point in terms of your ability to get into sports med fellowship from one, I would not recommend that. For one thing, it's going to be 13 years from now when you apply for a sports med fellowship (assuming you are a high school senior) and things might change a lot by then. All those are solid medical schools. Being from a famous medical school (like NYU) and/or just one with a well known orthopedic surgery department, would probably be somewhat helpful, but only if you still make it into the top of your class.

Your ideas of doing internships, etc. are great, though. It's always good for the resume and helps you learn about what you'd want for your future career.
Thanks for your advice Dragonfly! One of the guaranteed med programs I am looking at gives the option of going to either Dartmouth med or NYU Med. Which one do you think is better/more worth it all around?
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
How important is research in ortho or sports medicine towards getting a job w/ a team? For example, when you have finished your residency and fellowships, what do they base their choices on for who gets the job? Whats the process at that level? Does research, LOR's matter alot? or is it your resume?
 

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
30
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
How important is research in ortho or sports medicine towards getting a job w/ a team? For example, when you have finished your residency and fellowships, what do they base their choices on for who gets the job? Whats the process at that level? Does research, LOR's matter alot? or is it your resume?
Ive heard that landing a job with a team has a lot to do with WHERE you do your fellowship. For example, if you do a sports medicine fellowship at UCSF, you will likely have the means to make connections with the sports teams in that area. Just browsing the San Francisco 49er website you can see an advertisement that say "UCSF Sports Medicine." Univ of South Florida has a orthopedic residency program and sports medicine as well. Those residents and physicians are going to be working the athletic teams at USF, and I imagine if they are going to pick someone to hire, the ones who have been there for the last 5-6 years are going to have a pretty good shot at getting it.
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
Thanks for the insight. You have said that you've worked w/ your college team doctors and stuff. Do you think that would be a plus on your application if you applied for a job like that? And also, how did you get the research in ortho? Was it published and were you one of the authors?
 

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
30
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Thanks for the insight. You have said that you've worked w/ your college team doctors and stuff. Do you think that would be a plus on your application if you applied for a job like that? And also, how did you get the research in ortho? Was it published and were you one of the authors?
I mean yea I'm sure its a plus. I can say that I have expereince working in sports medicine, and I know that I enjoy doing it. But at that level (applying for residency/fellowship) I'm sure its very low on the list of what they care about. They are going to care about what I do in med school (as far as continuing my expereinces in sports med), my pre clinical grades, my step 1 score, and my performance in residency. If I dont do well on those things then my job as a college student won't mean jack.

I got the research in ortho by asking for it, simple as that. I live in San Diego, so i have UCSD right in my backyard (a powerhouse in research). I emailed the residency director/cheif of sports medicine for UCSD and told him i was interested in volunteering my time, shadowing, helping with research, seeing surgery, etc. He agreed, and I volunteered that summer. The following summer (after freshmany year of college) I emailed him again and asked if there was any work Ic ould be doing. He said yes, and this time it was a paid position. I got thrown in to the lab and helped out with the research he was doing. I ended up as an author in two publications, both in the journal of musculoskeletal medicine. I guess I just kinda lucked out! Goes to show that you never know how something is goign to turn out until you do it! I didnt have any special qualifications. I was a high school student, he let me volunteer, i worked hard and got hired the following year.
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
WOw! Thats amazing. 2 publications? I bet that will help you in the future. If you don't mind me asking, what year were you in college/med school when the articles were published?
 

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
30
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
WOw! Thats amazing. 2 publications? I bet that will help you in the future. If you don't mind me asking, what year were you in college/med school when the articles were published?
I did the work over the summer after my freshman year.....the articles were publiched that December and January of my Sophmore year.
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
Im going to try and do something like that as well - havbe you published anything else?
 

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
30
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Im going to try and do something like that as well - havbe you published anything else?
na thats it. done other research, but no publications. Hopefully something will come my way during med school!
 

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
what year are you in right now? senior in college?
 

Law2Doc

5K+ Member
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Dec 20, 2004
30,981
9,927
Status
Attending Physician
na thats it. done other research, but no publications. Hopefully something will come my way during med school!
Bear in mind that most residencies consider recent research to be of more value anyway, so if you are doing research in hopes of getting ortho, you are going to want to rack up your publications during med school anyhow.

But having done research in college makes getting up to speed researching in med school much easier.


I wouldn't get too sold on a particular specialty before you go to med school. It's nice to have "leanings" but you have to keep an open mind. A ton of people decide they don't like the surgical field lifestyle and long residencies once they see it first hand during rotations. And not everyone gets matched into ortho (very competitive field). And of those who get it, not that many actually end up working at the sideline of a professional or college team. A lot of these jobs are contracted to specific hospitals, which may or may not even be good places to work or do your training. So best to keep an open mind.

As you mentioned above, FP and PM&R also would allow you to work with injured athletes, and these paths tend to be shorter and less competitive.
 
Last edited:

Az1698

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2008
263
0
Status
Bear in mind that most residencies consider recent research to be of more value anyway, so if you are doing research in hopes of getting ortho, you are going to want to rack up your publications during med school anyhow.

But having done research in college makes getting up to speed researching in med school much easier.


I wouldn't get too sold on a particular specialty before you go to med school. It's nice to have "leanings" but you have to keep an open mind. A ton of people decide they don't like the surgical field lifestyle and long residencies once they see it first hand during rotations. And not everyone gets matched into ortho (very competitive field). And of those who get it, not that many actually end up working at the sideline of a professional or college team. A lot of these jobs are contracted to specific hospitals, which may or may not even be good places to work or do your training. So best to keep an open mind.

As you mentioned above, FP and PM&R also would allow you to work with injured athletes, and these paths tend to be shorter and less competitive.
So residencies value research in med school more? I see....but it wouldn't hurt to have it from college right? and any publication in any field is better than no publication?
 
About the Ads