Steve's Ultimate Dental School Application Guide & artist2022's AADSAS guide

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Scumbag_Steve

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* click here for artist2022's guide *

Hey Folks,

As crazy as it seems, the 2017 cycle is just around the corner, only a month away! SDN has helped me tremendously, and I figured it would be a grave sin on my part to not return the favor. So in the spirit of altruism that dentists should but may not have, I decided to make a concise (lol sort of), clear guide to answer all of the common questions applicants may have. Anybody who has helpful advice is certainly welcome to contribute.

Is there such a thing as a stupid question?

Absolutely. Your situation is not "unique", as much as you'd like to think so. The search function of SDN will do wonders for you, as most of the "unique" issues you face have faced countless other applicants in cycles past. Learn from their mistakes. If you have the personality where every life issue or decision is a crisis for which you need immediate personal attention, rethink your career plans.

How do I decide which schools in include on my application?

This is a common dilemma that students face. The answer is personal and specific to each applicant, but there are ways to ensure you're at least on the right track. First and foremost, you need to be honest with yourself. This works both ways. I've seen people with 3.8 GPAs, 26 AAs, and above average EC's who get nervous and apply to more than ten schools, which is the definition of overkill and a fantastic way to waste money. At the same time, some people will apply with sub 3.0 GPAs, 18 AAs, and expect to have interviews without making improvements to their applications. If you feel like you don't have the ability to honestly and objectively assess your candidacy for dental school, or think that you can but want to be as smart as possible in your school decisions, take the following steps:

  1. Look over @doc toothache 's guide, which is linked at the bottom of this post. It has each school's average DAT and GPA. Keep in mind that averages mean that there are students with stats higher and lower that get accepted every year. Just because you have a 3.48 and their average is a 3.51 does not mean you are not a qualified applicant at their school. While numbers aren't everything, this is a good place to start. If you're worrying about specific quirks of schools, like "MWU-AZ needs 500 volunteering hours" or "Tufts doesn't take CC credits", then the search function and school specific threads are your friends.
  2. In the very same guide, there is the extremely helpful section where it tells you the % of applicants interviewed, and the % of interviewees that are accepted, both for in state and out of state applicants (which doesn't quite matter as much as private schools but you can still see it anyway). For each school, determine whether or not you're in state or out of state. Then, take your residency's % of applicants interviewed, and multiply it by the % of interviewees that get accepted. This is the best way to get a "chance" estimate at your school. THIS IS ALSO THE BEST WAY TO DETERMINE WHICH SCHOOLS ARE "OOS FRIENDLY". DO NOT CREATE A NEW THREAD TO ASK. THE GUIDE WILL TELL YOU
  3. Shout out to @kimball for including a nice file about the percentage of applicants get accepted to all dental schools in general based on their DAT score. It's attached below.
  4. This thread is the most comprehensive listing of schools that give IS tuition to OOS students after the first year. Schools and changing residency: the list Keep in mind it is less common for schools to do this than it is for them to offer it, so check out the list and definitely keep it in mind when applying.
  5. Search SDN threads to find applicants who are similar to you and how they fared, especially school specific discussions from past cycles School Specific Discussions
  6. Consider cost. Each school's website will have their cost listed. Google is your friend
  7. DO NOT start a chance me thread. Execute steps 1-6 and don't be lazy.
Other IMPORTANT factors include cost, curriculum, quality, location, prestige, atmosphere, etc etc. Cost, location, and curriculum are quantitative factors for which google can do wonders in the road to enlightenment. Quality, prestige, atmosphere and "chances of specializing" anecdotes abound here on SDN. Use the search function, and don't post a new thread asking what has been asked every cycle for the past ten years.

How many schools should I include on my application?

Again, there is no one correct answer, but your financial situation and quality of your candidacy should be considered. For instance, rock-star applicants need not apply to more than 5-6 schools. These 5-6 schools will include "safety" schools, and schools where the applicant could really see themselves attending. Most applicants (those who have not saved thousands of lives, won a Nobel Prize, gotten above a 27 AA, or were Olympic athletes) should apply to anywhere from 6-10 schools. Include at least two "less competitive" private schools to guard against bad luck and poor interviewing skills. Include other schools that you would actually be happy to attend. Applicants who are a bit weaker should apply to about 10-15 schools, and carefully select the schools at which they have the best chance of acceptance based on the @doc toothache guide. If you are not competitive at 15 schools, you are not competitive at 20, 25, etc. You are spending money past the point of diminishing returns. Anyone who applies to 20 schools is throwing their money away; plain and simple.

I did not follow the advice that I gave here. I applied to 13 schools and regret doing so. 6-8 would have been fine had I been honest with myself and more judicious in my selection.

How much is it going this whole thing going to cost?

A lot. The Fee Assistance Program from AADSAS has pretty strict requirements, and chances are you aren't as poor as you think you are and won't get it. I've known one person who has gotten it, and they said it covered the costs to apply to four schools, and that they had to foot the bill for additional schools. Their words, not mine, but they are trustworthy and I would take them at their word but don't want to make any promises that I'm remembering this correctly, but I'm almost sure I am.

EDIT: Thanks @MolarBear11 for the info that the FAP guidelines are 300% of the poverty level. I stand corrected. Apply people!

DAT- $475
AADSAS Fee (1st school)- $251
Each additional dental school- $103.

So, assuming $600 for DAT prep materials and applying to ten schools, you are looking at $2253. Each school generally charges secondary fees from $50-$100 (with some exceptions on either end of the price range), so that's roughly another $750, putting you at $3003.

Please, for the love of God crash with a friend if you can for interviews, and do AirBnB if you can't. I didn't learn of AirBnB until I was almost done with my cycle. Instead of paying $80-$100 or more for a hotel room in cities, stay AirBnB for about half that. If possible, and if you're comfortable with it, room with another SDNer to split a room. It saves costs, gives you a friend, and is just a great option. Also, I drove to all of my interviews, so I can't really be of any help in terms of flights and trains, but do your best to find the cheapest tickets, but not at the expense of having to risk not arriving on time, or missing your flight on the way out. Interviews generally last until at least 2pm and you need to plan your exit from the city accordingly.

Hypothetically, let's say you get 5 interviews applying to ten schools. If you fly to two of them at $250 round trip, drive to the rest at $80 in gas round trip, that's an additional $740 in travel costs. If you're smart and do AirBnB for $50 a night at 4 schools, and stay with a friend at one, that's $940.

So, not including food during travel, the "average" person applying to ten schools and interviewing at five will spend $3,672 on the application process. So you either need to start saving well before you apply, or be born rich. A little bit of both is the best combination. My parents paid for the DAT and my suit, and I was left to cover the rest. I managed to do it a lot cheaper than the average applicant due to a fuel efficient car and staying with friends 3/8 interviews, but splurged on $700 on multiple DAT prep materials and I still spent around $2,500. You need to prepare for this if money will be an issue, and apply to as few schools as is safe for your application strength in order to save money.

Side note: I would shy away from taking a DAT course. You should be able to study using DAT Bootcamp and the prescribed materials on your own. It is cheaper and better. I know many of you have already taken the DAT but for those who haven't; heed these words!

When should I apply?

As early as possible, with no exceptions. The only questionable scenario that seems to pop up on SDN from time to time is the whole, "what if I don't have my DAT yet?" thing. This is how to address that situation. Apply without your DAT scores. Transcript and LOR verification, and AADSAS GPA calculations take 2-3 weeks, as does the official copy of your DAT scores to come in. There is a reason that the "first batch" is mailed almost a month before the application cycle starts (each subsequent batch is mailed out a week after the preceding batch, but batches don't mean jack **** and if you get your application in before August you're fine). The process takes time. So if you're going to be taking your DAT in June or July, submit your application without the DAT scores. Schools will generally acknowledge the receipt of your application, and not consider your candidacy until the scores come in. So while you're waiting for the DAT scores, the rest of the process is set in motion and by the time your DAT scores come in, your entire application is complete. If you wait until the DAT scores come in before applying, you are shooting yourself in the foot.

@fogorvostan brought up a good point in that you should definitely try to get an official copy of your transcript ahead of time to check it for mistakes. Not only will this help catch errors, you need at least an unofficial copy of your transcript in front of you to enter your grades correctly on AADSAS, so might as well kill two birds with one stone and get the official in the first place. Unforeseen errors, now matter how small or if they're on the part of your undergrad and not you, can delay your application. The only part of the application process which you should be anal retentive and paranoid about it making sure these little details are right, rather than parts of the process you can't control.

Thank you @SableFire for mentioning that some schools will accept faxes of the unofficial copy of your DAT scores if the situation above is applicable to your scenario. This can save you some valuable time in the application process if that particular school accepts the unofficial copy.

What will be on my application?

Obviously LORs, personal statement, grades, DAT scores etc. If you would like to start organizing you EC's into the format in which you'll have to enter it on AADSAS, take a look at what will be on there.

  • Academic Enrichment Programs
  • Awards/Honors/Scholarships
  • Shadowing
  • Extra Curricular/Volunteer/Community Service
  • Research Experience
  • Work Experience
Everything will have to be classified as one of these activities. There are limits (for instance, you can only include like ten or so volunteering activities). Each section has an opportunity for you to describe your shadowing, research, work, or volunteer experience, and I believe the limit on space is 120 characters (which is shorter than you think). If you can organize all of your EC's into this format and have the descriptions meet the space limits, you can copy and paste the day that AADSAS 2017 opens up and it will make your life much easier.

The manual dexterity prompt is open ended and has more space, the same for if you have to explain and academic issues/run ins with the law.


When should I hear from schools regarding interviews?
The schools specific discussion threads will tell you everything you need to know. The dates of notification in previous cycles are generally pretty close to the dates of notification for the current cycle give or take a few days.

How should I dress for my interview?

Thank you @fogorvostan for bringing this one up. I can't really speak for girls but again, like most other things, there are plenty of threads at your fingertips with the search function. I saw a wide range of stuff girls were wearing at interviews, and I can give the advice of a horribly uninformed and not stylish male contemporary, I just don't know it it's worth following.

You don't need a Hillary Clinton suit. Wear a skirt that is well below mid thigh, and those stocking/legging things that people wear so that they don't have bare legs. You can wear conservative heels if you are comfortable walking around in them on the tours, and if you can't handle them flats seemed pretty acceptable. Basically be a more modest version of Rachel Zane from Suits. She is a goddess, but I digress.

For guys, dark or light gray, navy (wear brown shoes if you pick navy!), or black (as long as it's not shiny, and thin pinstripes are a good idea to make it not too formal) suits. You don't need a $500 suit; we will need them later. Adcoms don't expect it to be hand made and tailored. You just need to follow obvious rules, like matching (saw kids with blue suits and black shoes, and make sure your shoes and belt match), you need long socks of appropriate color (saw a kid in a black suit with ankle socks), you need a normal tie without novelty patterns, and your suit needs to at least fit close to properly and not be wrinkled. Don't wear any overwhelming colors. Make sure your tie is tied properly. Don't be that kid who wears a bow tie, unless you're interviewing at a school in the South where it isn't as noticeable. Pretty much any suit that doesn't draw attention to you is perfectly acceptable. It's not too difficult to find stuff at Men's Wearhouse for around $200 that will be perfectly acceptable.

How do interviews work?

Invitation, turn around time, and scheduling varies widely from school to school. School specific discussion threads will, again, be crucial to answering your questions. Generally, schools will give you a few weeks to a month's notice to pick from a selection of dates where they're offering you a spot to interview. You're almost always notified via email, and school can have you email or call during to schedule your spot. Try to get Monday or Friday interviews if you can; you'll miss fewer classes/days of work when traveling.

Interview formats vary from school to school, but almost all include a presentation, tour, lunch, chance to speak with students, and the actual interview portion. The interview portion can be one-on-one with faculty, you talking to multiple faculty at once, you talking to a student and faculty, multiple chances to speak with different faculty members, or MMI (more on that later). Typically, interviews are very low stress, conversational, and relatively informal. It's a chance for the admissions committee to get to know who you are, talk about your accomplishments and/or red flags, and determine whether or not they want to spend the next four years spending time around you. Don't be afraid to stray from talk about your grades and EC's; that's what you should be doing. You should be engaging in small talk, discussing hobbies, sports, and family, and being a well-rounded person who isn't a robot born to study. Interviews definitely favor the extroverts, so introverts should at least be polite and as outgoing and friendly as their personality allows.

When you get the chance to talk to current students, take it and run with it. They are almost always very honest, friendly, helpful, and willing to answer all of your questions. They provide invaluable insight into the atmosphere of the school and what your life for the next four years will entail if you choose that school. As @fogorvostan mentioned, treat your student interviewers with respect. Just because they're closet to being your "peer" than the Dean, it doesn't mean you can say whatever you want around them. Just use common sense, and don't do anything that would reflect poorly. The students' thoughts on the school during your interview day will be a major factor in your decision to choose from multiple acceptances of similar cost if you're lucky enough to have them.

Do not ask people "what are they going to ask at my interview?" It makes you sound desperate and insecure. You're going to be asked why you decided to become a dentist and why you applied to a particular school at just about every interview, so think out a well-formulated response to those questions that you'll have at the tip of your tongue when you need it. Also, know your application, in terms of why you are passionate about your ECs and what you did. Other than this, interviews require no preparation and you don't want to regurgitate stale, rehearsed responses. Adcoms want to see you relaxed and able to discuss anything; they rarely want to grill you. If they bring up a blemish on your application, be honest and for the love of God be accountable and take responsibility for your own actions. Nobody will think you are a mature young adult if you blame your C in Orgo II on your professor.

Also, you need to prepare specific questions about the school. You can do this before you go to your interview, but you will probably be able to formulate a few good questions just by paying attention during the school's presentation. You can ask for clarification on some of the information they gave you, which shows that you're seriously interested in the school and interested in the information they're providing. It may be a good idea to come in with one or two questions already prepared, as some interview schedules will have some students speaking with faculty before the info presentation, but there's no need to have a bunch prepared; interviews generally aren't long enough to get to all of them and are easily susceptible to small talk tangents that last twenty minutes.

Most importantly, be yourself. I know it sounds cliche, but it's the best advice. There is absolutely no reason to be stressed out. Excited nerves are one thing, but these will be the strongest at your first interview and wane for subsequent ones. You should be really excited and enjoying yourself; if you view interviews with flat out fear or dread, you aren't in the right mindset.

As promised, a little thing on MMI. I had 2/8 interviews be MMI and they both generally followed the following format: You get a certain amount of time to read a prompt. It can be an ethical situation, a question about your application, or issues in dentistry. After you read it, you discuss the prompt with a faculty member or student. Time runs out, and you go on to the next prompt and faculty member. Anyone with any sort of common sense and the ability to communicate with other humans need not fear the MMI; it is not nearly bad as some of the stories I've heard about them. They are no more or less "stressful" or "difficult" than any other interviews.


Any words of wisdom?

I'm a hypocrite for suggesting this, but don't check your email, AADSAS Portal, and SDN constantly throughout the day. Check it in the morning when you wake up, at noon, and before you go to bed. Anything else is overkill and will stress you out. Just because other people on SDN are receiving interviews at a certain school doesn't mean that all the interview slots have been handed out. This especially holds true prior to November. Chill out, the world isn't ending. Be patient. @fogorvostan gives good advice in that one rejection, or even silence from a school, should be taken with a grain of salt. You have to understand this process is many months long and while at the end of the day I believe the process truly gets applicants into the schools they deserve, there are some individual circumstances where it doesn't seem to have a rhyme or reason.

Other applicants are not your enemies or the competition; they are friends you haven't met yet. You'll find that the other interviewees are people with whom you have a ton of common, and people that you will definitely be able to make small talk with around the table before the presentations start. If you know of someone on SDN going to an interview the same day as you are, PM them and meet up! Or better yet, share a room to save money! People are generally way too uptight about the whole process. Traveling to different cities and meeting other like-minded people in a world where not a lot of people are nerds like us and aspire to be dentists is a really exciting time in your life! I've met quite a few SDNers in real life, and remain friends with a good number of them! It's always an asset to have friends at different places across the country, for couch surfing, interview season, and being able to return the favor when they need to stay in your neck of the woods. Also, the more acquaintances and friends you have in the field of dentistry, the more perspectives you'll get. It's cool to know what goes on in other dental schools and other parts of the country.

Dental school admissions is not a zero sum game. Treat your fellow interviewees like friends, because there's a good chance they could easily become one. Adcoms aren't out to get you. You don't have to fight the person next to your for a seat. Be yourself, be polite, be respectful, be friendly, and be articulate, and you won't run into any problems.

I remember all of my interviews like they were yesterday. The application cycle was a really fun and eye opening experience in my life, and it's easy to let it pass by without appreciating it for what it really is. You'll never forget that feeling you get in your stomach when you receive your first interview invite in your inbox, when you shake the faculty members hand, when you walk out knowing you aced it, when you get to meet someone on SDN in real life, when you exchange numbers with someone at the end of the day, and on the morning of December 1st when your life changes forever. If you're not enjoying yourself, then you need to take a moment to realize just how far you've come and how far you need to go, and enjoy the moment for what it is!

If there are any other topics you feel I didn't cover, and aren't adequately explained in the @doc toothache guide linked below, just let me know and I'll be happy to help. Also, other people who are incoming or current dental schools are generally very helpful and knowledgeable so I welcome all of them to contribute!

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@Scumbag_Steve I would also add the ADEA guide on top of Toothaches. I found it a bit more helpful because it has more information than his guide and since it's a PDF it is much easier to navigate than word. http://www.adea.org/officialguide/

Also excellent sassyness. Really helpful read.

Some notes
  • Some schools allow faxes of DAT scores.
  • To add on to the interview day. Talk with others about your hobbies and don't think about it. Nothing is worse than an uncomfortable room with a bunch of quiet applicants. Be the person who can talk to people and connect. That is afterall what will make you a personable dentist in the future! Show that you aren't a stiff and enjoy the day and take in all that the schools are presenting you. The interview days are great and you are as much trying to see if you fit in as the school is seeing if you are right for them. It's a two-way street and come acceptance time if you are choosing between two relatively similar schools cost-wise you need to remember to your interview day and your experiences to pick which suits you best.
 
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Hey Folks,

As crazy as it seems, the 2017 cycle is just around the corner, only a month away! SDN has helped me tremendously, and I figured it would be a grave sin on my part to not return the favor. So in the spirit of altruism that dentists should but may not have, I decided to make a concise (lol sort of), clear guide to answer all of the common questions applicants may have. Anybody who has helpful advice is certainly welcome to contribute.

Is there such a thing as a stupid question?

Absolutely. Your situation is not "unique", as much as you'd like to think so. The search function of SDN will do wonders for you, as most of the "unique" issues you face have faced countless other applicants in cycles past. Learn from their mistakes. If you have the personality where every life issue or decision is a crisis for which you need immediate personal attention, rethink your career plans.

How do I decided which schools in include on my application?

This is a common dilemma that students face. The answer is personal and specific to each applicant, but there are ways to ensure you're at least on the right track. First and foremost, you need to be honest with yourself. This works both ways. I've seen people with 3.8 GPAs ,26 AAs, and above average EC's who get nervous and apply to more than ten schools, which is the definition of overkill and a fantastic way to waste money. At the same time, some people will apply with sub 3.0 GPAs, 18 AAs, and expectto have interviews without making improvements to their applications. If you feel like you don't have the ability to honestly and objectively assess your candidacy for dental school, or think that you can but want to be as smart as possible in your school decisions, take the following steps:

  1. Look over @doc toothache 's guide, which is linked at the bottom of this post. It has each school's average DAT and GPA. Keep in mind that averages mean that there are students with stats higher and lower that get accepted every year. Just because you have a 3.48 and their average is a 3.51 does not mean you are not a qualified applicant at their school. While numbers aren't everything, this is a good place to start. If you're worrying about specific quirks of schools, like "MWU-AZ needs 500 volunteering hours" or "Tufts doesn't take CC credits", then the search function and school specific threads are you friends.
  2. In the very same guide, there is the extremely helpful section where it tells you the % of applicants interviewed, and the % of interviewees that are accepted, both for in state and out of state applicants (which doesn't quite matter as much as private schools but you can still see it anyway). For each school, determine whether or not you're in state or out of state. Then, take your residency's % of applicants interviewed, and multiply it by the % of interviewees that get accepted. This is the best way to get a "chance" estimate at your school. THIS IS ALSO THE BEST WAY TO DETERMINE WHICH SCHOOLS ARE "OOS FRIENDLY". DO NOT CREATE A NEW THREAD TO ASK. THE GUIDE WILL TELL YOU.
  3. This thread is the most comprehensive listing of schools that give IS tuition to OOS students after the first year. http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/schools-and-changing-residency-the-list.1113135/ Keep in mind it is less common for schools to do this than it is for them to offer it, so check out the list and definitely keep it in mind when applying.
  4. Search SDN threads to find applicants who are similar to you and how their fared, especially school specific discussions from past cycles
  5. Consider cost. Each school's website will have their cost listed. Google is your friend
  6. DO NOT start a chance me thread. Execute steps 1-5 and don't be lazy.
Other IMPORTANT factors include cost, curriculum, quality, location, prestige, atmosphere, etc etc. Cost, location, and curriculum are quantitative factors for which google can do wonders in the road to enlightenment. Quality, prestige, atmosphere and "chances of specializing" anecdotes abound here on SDN. Use the search function, and don't post a new thread asking what has been asked every cycle for the past ten years.

How many schools should I include on my application?

Again, there is no one correct answer, but your financial situation and quality of your candidacy should be considered. For instance, rock-star applicants need not apply to more than 5-6 schools. These 5-6 schools will include "safety" schools, and schools where the applicant could really see themselves attending. Most applicants (those who have not saved thousands of lives, won a Nobel Prize, gotten above a 27 AA, or were Olympic athletes) should apply to anywhere from 6-10 schools. Include at least two "less competitive" private schools to guard against bad luck and poor interviewing skills. Include other schools that you would actually be happy to attend. Applicants who are a bit weaker should apply to about 10-15 schools, and carefully select the schools at which they have the best chance of acceptance based on the @doc toothache guide. If you are not competitive at 15 schools, you are not competitive at 20, 25, etc. You are spending money past the point of diminishing returns. Anyone who applies to 20 schools is throwing their money away; plain and simple.

I did not follow the advice that I gave here. I applied to 13 schools and regret doing so. 6-8 would have been fine had I been honest with myself and more judicious in my selection.

How much is it going this whole thing going to cost?

Alot. The Fee Assistance Program from AADSAS has pretty strict requirements, and chances are you aren't as poor as you think you are and won't get it. I've known one person who has gotten it, and they said it covered the costs to apply to four schools, and that they had to foot the bill for additional schools. Their words, not mine, but they are trustworthy and I would take them at their word but don't want to make any promises that I'm remembering this correctly, but I'm almost sure I am.

DAT- $400
AADSAS Fee- $245
Each additional dental school- $93.

So, assuming $500 for DAT prep materials and applying to ten schools, you are looking at $1,982. Each school generally charges secondary fees from $50-$100 (with some exceptions on either end of the price range), so that's roughly another $750, putting you at $2,732.

Please, for the love of God crash with a friend if you can for interviews, and do AirBnB if you can't. I didn't learn of AirBnB until I was almost done with my cycle. Instead of paying $80-$100 or more for a hotel room in cities, stay AirBnB for about half that. If possible, and if you're comfortable with it, room with another SDNer to split a room. It saves costs, gives you a friend, and is just a great option. Also, I drove to all of my interviews, so I can't really be of any help in terms of flights and trains, but do your best to find the cheapest tickets, but not at the expense of having to risk not arriving on time, or missing your flight on the way out. Interviews generally last until at least 2pm and you need to plan your exit from the city accordingly.

Hypothetically, let's say you get 5 interviews applying to ten schools. If you fly to two of them at $250 round trip, drive to the rest at $80 in gas round trip, that's an additional $740 in travel costs. If you're smart and do AirBnB for $50 a night at 4 schools, and stay with a friend at one, that's $940.

So, not including food during travel, the "average" person applying to ten schools and interviewing at five will spend $3,672 on the application process. So you either need to start saving well before you apply, or be born rich. A little bit of both is the best combination. My parents paid for the DAT and my suit, and I was left to cover the rest. I managed to do it a lot cheaper than the average applicant due to a fuel efficient car and staying with friends 3/8 interviews, but splurged on $700 on multiple DAT prep materials and I still spent around $2,500. You need to prepare for this if money will be an issue, and apply to as few schools as is safe for your application strength in order to save money.

Side note: I would shy away from taking a DAT course. You should be able to study using DAT Bootcamp and the prescribed materials on your own. It is cheaper and better. I know many of you have already taken the DAT but for those who haven't; heed these words!

When should I apply?

As early as possible, with no exceptions. The only questionable scenario that seems to pop up on SDN from time to time is the whole, "what if I don't have my DAT yet?" thing. This is how to address that situation. Apply without your DAT scores. Transcript and LOR verification, and AADSAS GPA calculations take 2-3 weeks, as does the official copy of your DAT scores to come in. There is a reason that the "first batch" is mailed almost a month before the application cycle starts (each subsequent batch is mailed out a week after the preceding batch, but batches don't mean jack **** and if you get your application in before August you're fine). The process takes time. So if you're going to be taking your DAT in June or July, submit your application without the DAT scores. Schools will generally acknowledge the receipt of your application, and not consider your candidacy until the scores come in. So while you're waiting for the DAT scores, the rest of the process is set in motion and by the time your DAT scores come in, your entire application is complete. If you wait until the DAT scores come in before applying, you are shooting yourself in the foot.

What will be on my application?

Obviously LORs, personal statement, grades, DAT scores etc. If you would like to start organizing you EC's into the format in which you'll have to enter it on AADSAS, take a look at what will be on there.

  • Academic Enrichment Programs
  • Awards/Honors/Scholarships
  • Shadowing
  • Extra Curricular/Volunteer/Community Service
  • Research Experience
  • Work Experience
Everything will have to be classified as one of these activities. There are limits (for instance, you can only include like ten or so volunteering activities). Each section has an opportunity for you to describe your shadowing, research, work, or volunteer experience, and I believe the limit on space is 120 characters (which is shorter than you think). If you can organize all of your EC's into this format and have the descriptions meet the space limits, you can copy and paste the day that AADSAS 2017 opens up and it will make your life much easier.

The manual dexterity prompt is open ended and has more space, the same for if you have to explain and academic issues/run ins with the law.


When should I hear from schools regarding interviews?

The schools specific discussion threads will tell you everything you need to know. The dates of notification in previous cycles are generally pretty close to the dates of notification for the current cycle give or take a few days.


How do interviews work?

Invitation, turn around time, and scheduling varies widely from school to school. School specific discussion threads will, again, be crucial to answering your questions. Generally, schools will give you a few weeks to a month's notice to pick from a selection of dates where they're offering you a spot to interview. You're almost always notified via email, and school can have you email or call during to schedule your spot. Try to get Monday or Friday interviews if you can; you'll miss fewer classes/days of work when traveling.

Interview formats vary from school to school, but almost all include a presentation, tour, lunch, chance to speak with students, and the actual interview portion. The interview portion can be one-on-one with faculty, you talking to multiple faculty at once, you talking to a student and faculty, multiple chances to speak with different faculty members, or MMI (more on that later). Typically, interviews are very low stress, conversational, and relatively informal. It's a chance for the admissions committee to get to know who you are, talk about your accomplishments and/or red flags, and determine whether or not they want to spend the next four years spending time around you. Don't be afraid to stray from talk about your grades and EC's; that's what you should be doing. You should be engaging in small talk, discussing hobbies, sports, and family, and being a well-rounded person who isn't a robot born to study. Interviews definitely favor the extroverts, so introverts should at least be polite and as outgoing and friendly as their personality allows.

When you get the chance to talk to current students, take it and run with it. They are almost always very honest, friendly, helpful, and willing to answer all of your questions. They provide invaluable insight into the atmosphere of the school and what your life for the next four years will entail if you choose that school.

Do not ask people "what are they going to ask at my interview?" It makes you sound desperate and insecure. You're going to be asked why you decided to become a dentist and why you applied to a particular school at just about every interview, so think out a well-formulated response to those questions that you'll have at the tip of your tongue when you need it. Also, know your application, in terms of why you are passionate about your ECs and what you did. Other than this, interviews require no preparation and you don't want to regurgitate stale, rehearsed responses. Adcoms want to see you relaxed and able to discuss anything; they rarely want to grill you. If they bring up a blemish on your application, be honest and for the love of God be accountable and take responsibility for your own actions. Nobody will think you are a mature young adult if you blame your C in Orgo II on your professor.

Also, you need to prepare specific questions about the school. You can do this before you go to your interview, but you will probably be able to formulate a few good questions just by paying attention during the school's presentation. You can ask for clarification on some of the information they gave you, which shows that you're seriously interested in the school and interested in the information they're providing. It may be a good idea to come in with one or two questions already prepared, as some interview schedules will have some students speaking with faculty before the info presentation, but there's no need to have a bunch prepared; interviews generally aren't long enough to get to all of them and are easily susceptible to small talk tangents that last twenty minutes.

Most importantly, be yourself. I know it sounds cliche, but it's the best advice. There is absolutely no reason to be stressed out. Excited nerves are one thing, but these will be the strongest at your first interview and wane for subsequent ones. You should be really excited and enjoying yourself; if you view interviews with flat out fear or dread, you aren't in the right mindset.

As promised, a little thing on MMI. I had 2/8 interviews be MMI and they both generally followed the following format: You get a certain amount of time to read a prompt. It can be an ethical situation, a question about your application, or issues in dentistry. After you read it, you discuss the prompt with a faculty member or student. Time runs out, and you go on to the next prompt and faculty member. Anyone with any sort of common sense and the ability to communicate with other humans need not fear the MMI; it is not nearly bad as some of the stories I've heard about them. They are no more or less "stressful" or "difficult" than any other interviews.


Any words of wisdom?

I'm a hypocrite for suggesting this, but don't check your email, AADSAS Portal, and SDN constantly throughout the day. Check it in the morning when you wake up, at noon, and before you go to bed. Anything else is overkill and will stress you out. Just because other people on SDN are receiving interviews at a certain school doesn't mean that all the interview slots have been handed out. This especially holds true prior to November. Chill out, the world isn't ending. Be patient.

Other applicants are not your enemies or the competition; they are friends you haven't met yet. You'll find that the other interviewees are people with whom you have a ton of common, and people that you will definitely be able to make small talk with around the table before the presentations start. If you know of someone on SDN going to an interview the same day as you are, PM them and meet up! Or better yet, share a room to save money! People are generally way too uptight about the whole process. Traveling to different cities and meeting other like-minded people in a world where not a lot of people are nerds like us and aspire to be dentists is a really exciting time in your life! I've met quite a few SDNers in real life, and remain friends with a good number of them! It's always an asset to have friends at different places across the country, for couch surfing, interview season, and being able to return the favor when they need to stay in your neck of the woods. Also, the more acquaintances and friends you have in the field of dentistry, the more perspectives you'll get. It's cool to know what goes on in other dental schools and other parts of the country.

Dental school admissions is not a zero sum game. Treat your fellow interviewees like friends, because there's a good chance they could easily become one. Adcoms aren't out to get you. You don't have to fight the person next to your for a seat. Be yourself, be polite, be respectful, be friendly, and be articulate, and you won't run into any problems.

I remember all of my interviews like they were yesterday. The application cycle was a really fun and eye opening experience in my life, and it's easy to let it pass by without appreciating it for what it really is. You'll never forget that feeling you get in your stomach when you receive your first interview invite in your inbox, when you shake the faculty members hand, when you walk out knowing you aced it, when you get to meet someone on SDN in real life, when you exchange numbers with someone at the end of the day, and on the morning of December 1st when your life changes forever. If you're not enjoying yourself, then you need to take a moment to realize just how far you've come and how far you need to go, and enjoy the moment for what it is!

If there are any other topics you feel I didn't covers, and aren't adequately explained in the @doc toothache guide linked below, just let me know and I'll be happy to help. Also, other people who are incoming or current dental schools are generally very helpful and knowledgeable so I welcome all of them to contribute!

Steven_Universe.png

Very well done dude, keep up the good work!
 
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Awesome write up! Lots of good info. I'm sure I'll have more questions later, but that was really helpful. Thanks!
 
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My extra words of wisdom:

  1. If you have never seen your official transcript before, ORDER IT AND MAIL IT TO YOURSELF! Seriously do this. It is worth the $10-20. My undergrad transcript had a mistake on it and said that I never graduated. This caused my application to be delayed almost four weeks. I was so upset.
  2. Learn what makes you unique. At all of my interviews, none of my shadowing/volunteering came up in a conversation. Instead, all of my interviewers were interested in hearing about me as a teacher because that is what me different.
  3. Don't freak out if you get a rejection early on; the whole process takes time. Nova rejected me almost immediately and I probably cried for a good 4 hours thinking I wasn't going to get into anywhere. It took another month or so, but I finally get my first interview offer and then the others start coming in after that. Stressing yourself out is going to make it worse.
  4. Dress well for your interview - that includes making sure your clothes fit properly. I saw some seriously questionable fashion choices. Search the pre-med forums for outfit ideas and if you have to question it, don't wear it. Also don't show up in jeans and pink sneakers like this girl at one of my interviews did for her PT interview. Lastly, ladies, if you can't walk in heels either learn or wear flats. I saw some serious Bambi impressions. Don't be Bambi.
  5. Speak respectfully to everyone at your interview. At all of your interviews, you'll probably have a chance to sit down and talk with current dental students. Just because they aren't the dean of the school doesn't mean you should drop out of interview mode. At one of my interviews, one of the applicants sitting by me kept dropping profanity while talking to the dental student. She looked super uncomfortable and excused herself rather quickly.
  6. Pick some interesting hobbies to talk about. Don't be like the guy at one of my interviews and tell us how you became a Brony. Yes that seriously happened.
 
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Savage post 10/10. Hopefully this helps out a lot of people and reduces the number of similar threads.
 
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There needs to be an SDN equivalent of Reddit Gold.
 
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@Scumbag_Steve I would also add the ADEA guide on top of Toothaches. I found it a bit more helpful because it has more information than his guide and since it's a PDF it is much easier to navigate than word. http://www.adea.org/officialguide/

Also excellent sassyness. Really helpful read.

Some notes
  • Some schools allow faxes of DAT scores.
  • To add on to the interview day. Talk with others about your hobbies and don't think about it. Nothing is worse than an uncomfortable room with a bunch of quiet applicants. Be the person who can talk to people and connect. That is afterall what will make you a personable dentist in the future! Show that you aren't a stiff and enjoy the day and take in all that the schools are presenting you. The interview days are great and you are as much trying to see if you fit in as the school is seeing if you are right for them. It's a two-way street and come acceptance time if you are choosing between two relatively similar schools cost-wise you need to remember to your interview day and your experiences to pick which suits you best.
Whaaaaat?

C'mon, sitting in the room full of fidgety, nervous recent grads and hearing "sooooo, what'd you get on the DAT? Cool......yeah.....I'm excited too" fifty times was the best experience of my life! Talk about hobbies? That's for the squares.
 
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Whaaaaat?

C'mon, sitting in the room full of fidgety, nervous recent grads and hearing "sooooo, what'd you get on the DAT? Cool......yeah.....I'm excited too" fifty times was the best experience of my life! Talk about hobbies? That's for the squares.
I got a 30 bruh. I'm even better than @Rockstar123. If you want to learn how not to be a condescending egotistical dickbag on SDN give his thread a read http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/dental-rock-star-smashin-the-dat.1030028/ always fun to resurrect some old threads!
 
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Members don't see this ad :)
.
 
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LOL I wish you had post this up before I posted yesterday! Great post!
 
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Gorgeous and well-written.
If any mods are reading this, please consider making this guide a "sticky" on the front page.

I especially liked the part where you put everything in perspective:

"You'll never forget that feeling you get in your stomach when you receive your first interview invite in your inbox, when you shake the faculty members hand, when you walk out knowing you aced it, when you get to meet someone on SDN in real life, when you exchange numbers with someone at the end of the day, and on the morning of December 1st when your life changes forever. If you're not enjoying yourself, then you need to take a moment to realize just how far you've come and how far you need to go, and enjoy the moment for what it is!"

Thank you for contributing to SDN, to the future classes, and for being such a great member in general.

Three cheers for Scumbag Steve!

P.S. @Scumbag_Steve , one question- can you chance me? xD
 
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That was so helpful, thanks!!! Kind of made me way more nervous about the application process, but now I am so much more prepared about what to expect. Seriously, thanks for taking the time to type this up!
 
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Wait what's wrong with navy suit/black shoes??? :shrug:
 
After this thread, your name should be Good Guy Greg instead of Scumbag_Steve, great information. Cheers.
 
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One time, one kid said there's no stupid question, then he proceed to ask the question. Then I said "and yet you came up with one."

I was hated by the whole debate team ever since...
 
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The mere sight of it doesn't make your skin crawl?

I saw a guy with a sport's blazer, contrasting elbow patches, mismatched chinos, and loafers. No socks. No tie. That had me like ???:uhno:???

Perhaps he thought he was already a dentist.
 
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Great tips! But I would just like to add, for the cost section, that I would instead encourage people to apply for FAP. The income limit that ADEA accepts for FAP is 300% the national poverty line. Scroll down and click on "eligibility to apply for FAP" to find the chart: http://www.adea.org/GoDental/Applic...chool_ADEA_AADSAS/Fee_Assistance_Program.aspx

I got it and it allowed me to apply to 3 schools (not 4) for free. If you want to apply to more, you would have to pay $93 each for those.
 
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I didn't see this scenario addressed but I apologize if I missed it. What if I am retaking the DAT, should I still submit on the first day? The only hesitation I have is that my application could be processed before I take the DAT at the end of June (which is what I am shooting for, it could be pushed back to mid july). I do not think schools actually hold your application if you indicate a retake and they may just make a decision without waiting. Thanks in advance!
 
The mere sight of it doesn't make your skin crawl?
Depends on the shade of blue I suppose... If it's a lighter blue then you should definitely wear brown shoes. If anything though, a navy suit with black shoes is considered a more formal look, while brown shoes are more relaxed.
 
This thing needs a sticky
 
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Thanks for the guide, Scumbag! (Kinda feels weird saying it like that...)
 
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You da real MVP steve. Respek.
 
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Depends on the shade of blue I suppose... If it's a lighter blue then you should definitely wear brown shoes. If anything though, a navy suit with black shoes is considered a more formal look, while brown shoes are more relaxed.
It's an old fashion rule. Black was/is generally considered a no-no with navy, especially if it's a very dark navy. Personally, I think it looks perfectly fine if there's enough contrast between the black and the navy. I've seen black and navy done a lot, so it might be just an old rule along the lines of 'no white after labor day' at this point. But no brown shoes with black suits... that really is jarring to look at.
 
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Would applying say 2 -3 weeks from the opening date of the application be harmful at all to my chances? Or could I send my apps first and update later with the LoE? I'm asking because, like BeaverLover said above, one of my LoE writers is pretty slow, and I don't think she'll be done by June 1st.
 
This is such an awesome post for future applicants!

Is there such a thing as a stupid question?
Absolutely.

HAHAHA, I really love this.


How many schools should I include on my application?

Again, there is no one correct answer, but your financial situation and quality of your candidacy should be considered. For instance, rock-star applicants need not apply to more than 5-6 schools. These 5-6 schools will include "safety" schools, and schools where the applicant could really see themselves attending. Most applicants (those who have not saved thousands of lives, won a Nobel Prize, gotten above a 27 AA, or were Olympic athletes) should apply to anywhere from 6-10 schools. Include at least two "less competitive" private schools to guard against bad luck and poor interviewing skills. Include other schools that you would actually be happy to attend. Applicants who are a bit weaker should apply to about 10-15 schools, and carefully select the schools at which they have the best chance of acceptance based on the @doc toothache guide. If you are not competitive at 15 schools, you are not competitive at 20, 25, etc. You are spending money past the point of diminishing returns. Anyone who applies to 20 schools is throwing their money away; plain and simple.

I did not follow the advice that I gave here. I applied to 13 schools and regret doing so. 6-8 would have been fine had I been honest with myself and more judicious in my selection.

I definitely agree on the carefully selecting schools for which you have a good chance at. I was a weaker applicant, and with my fear of not getting in my top 15 list, I applied to 20+ schools. In hindsight, I really should've crossed off 8-10 right off the bat. Nonetheless, I was very sure that I wanted to go dental school this year, and really would've gone anywhere I applied to, so I do not regret my decision.

This is your future, and you must do the proper research before your apply. Look at all aspects of the school (cost, location, curriculum), and try to talk to current students before your interview. They will qualm your nerves, and speak the most honestly of their school. Look up requirements and make sure you fulfill them. If you are unsure, send an e-mail! Admission counselors are more than happy to answer, and plus you can establish a small connection before applying. If a school is not financially feasible, don't bother applying and wasting your time and the school's time. Don't be that person that gets into an expensive school, and starts a thread on "is this financial suicide or should I reapply" thread. If we are talking about financial sound decisions, it would not be smart to throw away ~$500+ to apply to and interview a school you would not seriously consider.
 
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I think another thing we should add (if it hasn't been said) is to utilize SDN's interview feedback page for each school you will be interviewing at. A lot of my interview questions came straight from the feedback other students had written about. It also tells you what to expect for your entire interview day, how many interviewers you have, the format, etc. I wrote a list of the most common questions and then came up with natural responses (not memorized). It really helped.

For example, this is Harvard's. Scroll to "questions" and expand each sub-category.

https://schools.studentdoctor.net/school/hsdm/survey/28/harvard-school-of-dental-medicine/0?b=/schools/3/dental-school-rankings/0
 
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I think another thing we should add (if it hasn't been said) is to utilize SDN's interview feedback page for each school you will be interviewing at. A lot of my interview questions came straight from the feedback other students had written about. It also tells you what to expect for your entire interview day, how many interviewers you have, the format, etc. I wrote a list of the most common questions and then came up with natural responses (not memorized). It really helped.

For example, this is Harvard's.

https://schools.studentdoctor.net/school/hsdm/survey/28/harvard-school-of-dental-medicine/0?b=/schools/3/dental-school-rankings/0

Seconded!
 
Thanks for the info, scumbag.
 
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As a semi-fashion-conscientious-person, here is my advice for women's interview clothing. Remember you are interviewing for professional school, not a regular job. It is always better to go more conservative and less "business casual".

Suits:
  • Wear a suit but it doesn't matter if it is a skirt or pants.
    • If it is a pant suit: make sure that the hem of your pants is appropriate. If you plan on changing shoes, adjust for the difference when going from heels to flats.
    • If it is a skirt suit: practice bending over, sitting down, getting in and out of the car. You need to make sure that the skirt does not go up too high. You want to aim for a skirt that falls right by your knees for a flattering but conservative look.
  • For your suit jacket, try on a million of them to see what kind is most flattering on you. Again, go conservative and don't get anything that is super dramatic. You need to practice moving around in the jacket as well. If you have a large chest, make sure your buttons are not stretching.
  • Go conservative for the color of your suit: black, dark gray, navy, etc. This isn't the time for the bright red jacket. You will feel like you stick out and feel self-conscious. I personally think that you should match your jacket and pants so they are the same color, but I did see some girls wearing outfits like this. The pre-med forum is pretty adamant against different color jacket/pants, so I would lean on the more conservative side and not wear it.

Shoes:
  • Closed toe ONLY.
  • Like I said earlier, if you are wearing heels, make sure you can walk in them for extended periods of time. You need to be able to go up and down stairs, on concrete/soil/carpet/grass/etc., and on tours of the school. I personally wore my interview heels almost full time for 2 weeks.
  • Pack a pair of flats in your bag just in case your heels are a failure. It is much better to excuse yourself to the bathroom when you have a moment and change shoes than to be limping around day. Make sure your flats are also broken in. You don't want blisters.
  • If you need to stuff your shoes with all sorts of padding, you are wearing the wrong size.
  • The color needs to match your suit. I refuse to wear black shoes with navy (despite what others in SDN say), so match accordingly.
Shirt/Blouse:
  • Go look in the career sections at women's stores for some good shirts. They should be conservative but not frumpy. Solids look best and I would suggest staying away from most patterns
  • Remember when you take off your jacket that your sleeves need to be an appropriate length.
  • Find a material that is breathable and will not show sweat. It's possible you could be interviewing down south when it is still 80+ degrees out. You don't wear giant sweat marks on your shirt. Some people also sweat when nervous.
Accessories:
  • If it is going to be cold where you are interviewing, have a coat. I bought a knee length pea coat for interviewing.
  • Simple jewelry. Leave the statement necklace at home
  • Either leave the nail polish off or have a simple manicure. Pick polish that is neutral in shade. One girl I interviewed with had on bright blue nail polish and it looked really silly.
  • Go for a "no makeup" makeup look.
    • NO INSTAGRAM BROWS.
    • Leave the eyeliner wings at home
    • Be sure that your foundation does not oxides poorly and your concealer matches.
    • If you don't know how to contour, don't make your interview the first day you try it.
    • Spray with a setting spray to ensure nothing budges (my favorite is by Urban Decay but Mac has a nice one too)
    • Water proof mascara
    • If you want your lips to have some color, go for a neutral matte color (or chapstick).
  • Your purse needs to match your shoes. Do not bring an oversized tote. Do not have a bag with tons of zippers, frills, or other metal things on it. Mine looked like this
Underwear:
  • Make sure your bra fits properly.
  • You must wear nude/skin-colored panty hose if you are wearing a skirt. No exceptions. Trust me I hate them too.
    • PACK AN EXTRA PAIR IN CASE YOURS RIPS!!!! I accidentally brushed up against a screw that was sticking out at my UNE interview and ripped my panty hose. But I was able to sneak off to the bathroom to change before it was noticeable.
    • Do not wear leggings.
  • WEAR SPANX. Just do it. It'll smooth you out and make your outfit fit better.
Hair:
  • Wearing it up or down doesn't matter. Just make sure that it looks clean and professional.
Piercings:
  • Take everything out except for ear lobes. Premed forums will tell you "no" towards anything more than 1 earring per ear, but I wore two simple studs in each ear and didn't think it was a big deal. My hair also covered it.

I'll add other stuff as I think of them. Again, this is just a guide and do not have to follow anything that I say. Except for panty hose with a skirt. That you have to do.
 
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As a semi-fashion-conscientious-person, here is my advice for women's interview clothing. Remember you are interviewing for professional school, not a regular job. It is always better to go more conservative and less "business casual".

Suits:
  • Wear a suit but it doesn't matter if it is a skirt or pants.
    • If it is a pant suit: make sure that the hem of your pants is appropriate. If you plan on changing shoes, adjust for the difference when going from heels to flats.
    • If it is a skirt suit: practice bending over, sitting down, getting in and out of the car. You need to make sure that the skirt does not go up too high. You want to aim for a skirt that falls right by your knees for a flattering but conservative look.
  • For your suit jacket, try on a million of them to see what kind is most flattering on you. Again, go conservative and don't get anything that is super dramatic. You need to practice moving around in the jacket as well. If you have a large chest, make sure your buttons are not stretching.
  • Go conservative for the color of your suit: black, dark gray, navy, etc. This isn't the time for the bright red jacket. You will feel like you stick out and feel self-conscious. I personally think that you should match your jacket and pants so they are the same color, but I did see some girl's wearing outfits like this. The pre-med forum is pretty adamant against different color jacket/pants, so I would lean on the more conservative side and not wear it.

Shoes:
  • Closed toe ONLY.
  • Like I said earlier, if you are wearing heels, make sure you can walk in them for extended periods of time. You need to be able to go up and down stairs, on concrete/soil/carpet/grass/etc., and on tours of the school. I personally wore my interview heels almost full time for 2 weeks.
  • Pack a pair of flats in your bag just in case your heels are a failure. It is much better to excuse yourself to the bathroom when you have a moment and change shoes than to be limping around day. Make sure your flats are also broken in. You don't want blisters.
  • If you need to stuff your shoes with all sorts of padding, you are wearing the wrong size.
  • The color needs to match your suit. I refuse to wear black shoes with navy (despite what others in SDN say), so match accordingly.
Shirt/Blouse:
  • Go look in the career sections at women's stores for some good shirts. They should be conservative but not frumpy. Solids look best and I would suggest staying away from most patterns
  • Remember when you take off your jacket that your sleeves need to be an appropriate length.
  • Find a material that is breathable and will not show sweat. It's possible you could be interviewing down south when it is still 80+ degrees out. You don't wear giant sweat marks on your shirt. Some people also sweat when nervous.
Accessories:
  • If it is going to be cold where you are interviewing, have a coat. I bought a knee length pea coat for interviewing.
  • Simple jewelry. Leave the statement necklace at home
  • Either leave the nail polish off or have a simple manicure. Pick polish that is neutral in shade. One girl I interviewed with had on bright blue nail polish and it looked really silly.
  • Go for a "no makeup" makeup look.
    • NO INSTAGRAM BROWS.
    • Leave the eyeliner wings at home
    • Be sure that your foundation does not oxides poorly and your concealer matches.
    • If you don't know how to contour, don't make your interview the first day you try it.
    • Spray with a setting spray to ensure nothing budges (my favorite is by Urban Decay but Mac has a nice one too)
    • Water proof mascara
    • If you want your lips to have some color, go for a neutral matte color (or chapstick).
  • Your purse needs to match your shoes. Do not bring an oversized tote. Do not have a bag with tons of zippers, frills, or other metal things on it. Mine looked like this
Underwear:
  • Make sure your bra fits properly.
  • You must wear nude/skin-colored panty hose if you are wearing a skirt. No exceptions. Trust me I hate them too.
    • PACK AN EXTRA PAIR IN CASE YOURS RIPS!!!! I accidentally brushed up against a screw that was sticking out at my UNE interview and ripped my panty hose. But I was able to sneak off to the bathroom to change before it was noticeable.
    • Do not wear leggings.
  • WEAR SPANX. Just do it. It'll smooth you out and make your outfit fit better.
Hair:
  • Wearing it up or down doesn't matter. Just make sure that it looks clean and professional.
Piercings:
  • Take everything out except for ear lobes. Premed forums will tell you "no" towards anything more than 1 earring per ear, but I wore two simple studs in each ear and didn't think it was a big deal. My hair also covered it.

I'll add other stuff as I think of them. Again, this is just a guide and do not have to follow anything that I say. Except for panty hose with a skirt. That you have to do.
A girl at my NYU interview literally did the exact opposite of everything you posted haha. Let's just say she didn't get accepted on Dec. 1st.
 
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A girl at my NYU interview literally did the exact opposite of everything you posted haha. Let's just say she didn't get accepted on Dec. 1st.
I will never forget bright pink jacket, jeans, and sneakers girl at MWU AZ. Bless her heart.
 
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Hey I have a question. I took the DAT last summer and got a 19AA and 18 TS. I rescheduled to take it late June. If I applied the first day the cycle opens, I am worried that the dental schools would only get a look at the first set of scores I received and there wouldn't be enough time for my new scores to show (if i do better). So should I just wait to apply mid July? Or is their like a notification on my app that says I rescheduled to take the DAT at this date?
 
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