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Hello2000

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    It is naloxone injections to reverse opiod overdose that are going to be provided from pharmacies without a prescription. They really are a life saver in drug overdose. They are freely available in pharmacies in Europe without prescription. Naloxone is the epipen for addicts and are designed really for friends, relatives healthcare workers to carry if they spot an addict in trouble.
     

    Humble Sloth

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      I heard that suboxone might be going OTC! Can't find any news on it, but maybe someone here has? Any insight would be appreciated!

      Buprenorphine should be OTC. With the huge increase in opiate addicts, access to weak but pure opiates would be a blessing for all the addicts that are soon to die due to variation in street heroin potency. There may be some laws in certain states that ease the burden for prescription of Buprenorphine in the context for certain opiate addict treatment facilities.
       

      rph3664

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        It is naloxone injections to reverse opiod overdose that are going to be provided from pharmacies without a prescription. They really are a life saver in drug overdose. They are freely available in pharmacies in Europe without prescription. Naloxone is the epipen for addicts and are designed really for friends, relatives healthcare workers to carry if they spot an addict in trouble.

        If I had a friend or relative who was a heroin addict, which is really what these are intended for, they would not be in my life until they got clean. Whenever I hear about one dying, my first thought is always that they probably spared those who cared about them a lot of misery by taking themselves out. :(
         

        Lnsean

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          Suboxone is a partial agonist so it actually prevents full on abuse.

          it's not the reason why...buprenorphine has higher affinity for mu receptors than other agonists and only naloxone has comparably high affinity to compete against buprenorphine in cases of blatant abuse. plain buprenophine (subutex) is just as abusive and addicting as any of the other stuff out there. I have yet to see a patient weaned off subutex or even suboxone...but I guess it's a controlled addiction with the doctor monitoring the pt's progress.
           
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          gwarm01

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            it's not the reason why...buprenorphine has higher affinity for mu receptors than other agonists and only naloxone has comparably high affinity to compete against buprenorphine in cases of blatant abuse. plain buprenophine (subutex) is just as abusive and addicting as any of the other stuff out there. I have yet to see a patient weaned off subutex or even suboxone...but I guess it's a controlled addiction with the doctor monitoring the pt's progress.
            Same here. My dad is an opiate addict and has been on suboxone for a few years with no sign of weaning off. He gets mad that it doesn't really get him high, which I explained is kind of the point.
             

            BidingMyTime

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              I heard that suboxone might be going OTC! Can't find any news on it, but maybe someone here has? Any insight would be appreciated!

              HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA wishful thinking. No suboxone is not going OTC, which is why you can't find any news on it. And given recent DEA history, it's far more likely that it will move up in schedule and be harder to get, than it will ever be made OTC. As it is now, doctors have to have a special license, separate from their medical or DEA license in order to prescribe suboxone.
               
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              lane one

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                Buprenorphine should be OTC. With the huge increase in opiate addicts, access to weak but pure opiates would be a blessing for all the addicts that are soon to die due to variation in street heroin potency. There may be some laws in certain states that ease the burden for prescription of Buprenorphine in the context for certain opiate addict treatment facilities.
                You're an idiot. They should go to a clinic. Why would an addict choose to wean themselves off of heroin and onto something that they don't get high from without some sort of support system in place.
                 
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                Humble Sloth

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                  Nice ad hominem sir! The addicts that i have worked with in the past choose to use buprenorphine because it prevented them from getting sick when they couldn't find or couldn't afford street heroin. Naloxone used to only be available at a clinic. Not everyone has access to a clinic. Soon i think Naloxone will be OTC everywhere.


                  You're an idiot. They should go to a clinic. Why would an addict choose to wean themselves off of heroin and onto something that they don't get high from without some sort of support system in place.

                  You're an idiot. They should go to a clinic. Why would an addict choose to wean themselves off of heroin and onto something that they don't get high from without some sort of support system in place.
                   

                  Steenz

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                    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA wishful thinking. No suboxone is not going OTC, which is why you can't find any news on it. And given recent DEA history, it's far more likely that it will move up in schedule and be harder to get, than it will ever be made OTC. As it is now, doctors have to have a special license, separate from their medical or DEA license in order to prescribe suboxone.
                    Which is completely ridiculous since there are no special licenses required for prescribing methadone and other hifhly addictive pain meds. Methadone should be the drug that requires a special license. It is much more likely to be abused, it gets the people who take it high to the point of nodding out and falling asleep while driving, and more people overdose and die from that drug than any other I have seen. Suboxone/ subutex is actually a much safer and less abusable alternative. Uneducated or ignorant people just give it a bad rap.
                     

                    Steenz

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                      You're an idiot. They should go to a clinic. Why would an addict choose to wean themselves off of heroin and onto something that they don't get high from without some sort of support system in place.[/QUOTE. It may not be the norm but it does happen. There are some addicts out there who want to live a better life and are willing to be their own motivation to wean off whatever and start suboxone. It may be very few but they do exist.
                       

                      ldiot

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                        Which is completely ridiculous since there are no special licenses required for prescribing methadone and other hifhly addictive pain meds. Methadone should be the drug that requires a special license. It is much more likely to be abused, it gets the people who take it high to the point of nodding out and falling asleep while driving, and more people overdose and die from that drug than any other I have seen. Suboxone/ subutex is actually a much safer and less abusable alternative. Uneducated or ignorant people just give it a bad rap.

                        You don't need a special license to prescribe buprenorphine for pain either. Methadone is CII, buprenorphine is not. The prescribing requirements are based on indication. Patients being treated for addiction are inherently more likely to abuse a drug than patients being treated for pain. There is more to take into account than the drug alone.
                         
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                        zelman

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                          Which is completely ridiculous since there are no special licenses required for prescribing methadone and other hifhly addictive pain meds. Methadone should be the drug that requires a special license. It is much more likely to be abused, it gets the people who take it high to the point of nodding out and falling asleep while driving, and more people overdose and die from that drug than any other I have seen. Suboxone/ subutex is actually a much safer and less abusable alternative. Uneducated or ignorant people just give it a bad rap.
                          You don't need a special license to prescribe methadone, but it can't be dispensed for opiate addiction anywhere but a methadone clinic. Same restriction, but the opposite end of the process.
                           
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