Feb 18, 2016
10
0
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Resident [Any Field]
Hi
I'm wondering how the outlook for a vascular surgery or orthopedic surgery ST spot be like in rural locations in Sweden and in Sweden in general?
 

LucidSplash

Bloody Plumber
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Feb 27, 2005
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Hi
I'm wondering how the outlook for a vascular surgery or orthopedic surgery ST spot be like in rural locations in Sweden and in Sweden in general?
I doubt anyone here knows. Can try asking in the international forum, though not sure we have many swedes on this site.
 

Trauma Surgeon

5+ Year Member
Oct 15, 2012
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I doubt anyone here knows. Can try asking in the international forum, though not sure we have many swedes on this site.
You never know who lurks in these forums ;)

OP, what exactly do you want to know?
Our system is totally different compared to US. There is no central matching system like ERAS, and the residency spots are based on the departments needs for residents and future supply of attendings and are funded by the hospital. So it differs from year to year how many spots are available at one place. It is easier to match in smaller programs/hospitals, but in general you will not be exposed to the more complex cases and very little research opportunities available.

Overall the orthopedic surgery is easy match here in Sweden. Vascular is from this year their own residency, no need to do the 5 years gensurg + 2-3yrs vascular fellowship anymore. But, to my best knowledge (and being good friend with one of the persons running the change in the residency structure), no residency is up and running yet. This is because of the financing issues for the residents. Overall, vasc surg is an easier match than US…

If you have more specific questions, I would be happy to try and answer them.
 

LucidSplash

Bloody Plumber
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I stand happily corrected. :)

You never know who lurks in these forums ;)

OP, what exactly do you want to know?
Our system is totally different compared to US. There is no central matching system like ERAS, and the residency spots are based on the departments needs for residents and future supply of attendings and are funded by the hospital. So it differs from year to year how many spots are available at one place. It is easier to match in smaller programs/hospitals, but in general you will not be exposed to the more complex cases and very little research opportunities available.

Overall the orthopedic surgery is easy match here in Sweden. Vascular is from this year their own residency, no need to do the 5 years gensurg + 2-3yrs vascular fellowship anymore. But, to my best knowledge (and being good friend with one of the persons running the change in the residency structure), no residency is up and running yet. This is because of the financing issues for the residents. Overall, vasc surg is an easier match than US…

If you have more specific questions, I would be happy to try and answer them.
 
OP
RobotDoc
Feb 18, 2016
10
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
You never know who lurks in these forums ;)

OP, what exactly do you want to know?
Our system is totally different compared to US. There is no central matching system like ERAS, and the residency spots are based on the departments needs for residents and future supply of attendings and are funded by the hospital. So it differs from year to year how many spots are available at one place. It is easier to match in smaller programs/hospitals, but in general you will not be exposed to the more complex cases and very little research opportunities available.

Overall the orthopedic surgery is easy match here in Sweden. Vascular is from this year their own residency, no need to do the 5 years gensurg + 2-3yrs vascular fellowship anymore. But, to my best knowledge (and being good friend with one of the persons running the change in the residency structure), no residency is up and running yet. This is because of the financing issues for the residents. Overall, vasc surg is an easier match than US…

If you have more specific questions, I would be happy to try and answer them.
Tack
A very detailed answer.
I'm a Swedish citizen but studied abroad so I have no trouble with the language or residentcy permits.
I done masters specialising in vascular surgery in England there aren't a lot of available spots here which are announced on a yearly basis I think its 20 spots per year which are highly fought over.

I have been following several online forums to get my head around the application process and competition for ST training but no clear answers.
This bit of your answer made a lot.of sense from.what I had been hearing about it also depends on luck to get into your speciality of choice.
"the residency spots are based on the departments needs for residents and future supply of attendings and are funded by the hospital. So it differs from year to year how many spots are available at one place."
 
OP
RobotDoc
Feb 18, 2016
10
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
You never know who lurks in these forums ;)

OP, what exactly do you want to know?
Our system is totally different compared to US. There is no central matching system like ERAS, and the residency spots are based on the departments needs for residents and future supply of attendings and are funded by the hospital. So it differs from year to year how many spots are available at one place. It is easier to match in smaller programs/hospitals, but in general you will not be exposed to the more complex cases and very little research opportunities available.

Overall the orthopedic surgery is easy match here in Sweden. Vascular is from this year their own residency, no need to do the 5 years gensurg + 2-3yrs vascular fellowship anymore. But, to my best knowledge (and being good friend with one of the persons running the change in the residency structure), no residency is up and running yet. This is because of the financing issues for the residents. Overall, vasc surg is an easier match than US…

If you have more specific questions, I would be happy to try and answer them.
If a residency spot is available in a hospital other than the one you are working in is the spot advertised at all?
 

Trauma Surgeon

5+ Year Member
Oct 15, 2012
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110
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If a residency spot is available in a hospital other than the one you are working in is the spot advertised at all?
Most of the times "No".

Usually this is how it works, you work a year or two as "preliminary" (underläkare) in hopes that a spot will be available. If your department chief is honest, he knows if there will be a spot available in the years to come and after 6-12 months will tell you if are competitive for the position, usually there are several prelims at the department at the same time. If he knows there will not be a position available at his department in near future, and vouches for you and knows that a spot will be opening soon somewhere else, he might be in a position to fix you a prelim spot at the other hospital, but still you will have to do at least 6 months before being offered a residency contract.

Eventually, if a spot is available and you get it, much of that 2 years will be accounted for as part of your residency.
 
OP
RobotDoc
Feb 18, 2016
10
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Most of the times "No".

Usually this is how it works, you work a year or two as "preliminary" (underläkare) in hopes that a spot will be available. If your department chief is honest, he knows if there will be a spot available in the years to come and after 6-12 months will tell you if are competitive for the position, usually there are several prelims at the department at the same time. If he knows there will not be a position available at his department in near future, and vouches for you and knows that a spot will be opening soon somewhere else, he might be in a position to fix you a prelim spot at the other hospital, but still you will have to do at least 6 months before being offered a residency contract.

Eventually, if a spot is available and you get it, much of that 2 years will be accounted for as part of your residency.
It still is a great system in place if the underläkare time is counted towards the 5yr of specialisation most countries don't count Senior house officer time towards the specialisation.
 
Jun 10, 2013
4
0
Status
Medical Student
Usually this is how it works, you work a year or two as "preliminary" (underläkare) in hopes that a spot will be available. If your department chief is honest, he knows if there will be a spot available in the years to come and after 6-12 months will tell you if are competitive for the position, usually there are several prelims at the department at the same time. If he knows there will not be a position available at his department in near future, and vouches for you and knows that a spot will be opening soon somewhere else, he might be in a position to fix you a prelim spot at the other hospital, but still you will have to do at least 6 months before being offered a residency contract.

Eventually, if a spot is available and you get it, much of that 2 years will be accounted for as part of your residency.
So what's the difference of underläkare and AT-läkare? (I can't find the explanation anywhere). I'm interested in a surgical residency in Sweden after I graduate from an EU med school, but in my country (Croatia) after we finish the 6th year we have a 1 year internship after which we pass the state exam to be able to apply for residencies. So, I don't understand whether I would first have to take the state exam here to be able to apply for internship in Sweden or would the 1-year internship followed by a state exam be recognized in Sweden (I hear this isn't the case and everyone who wants an ST-läkare position must pass AT provet i Sverige)? And if I have to do the underläkare internship first in Sweden, would I find a spot by contacting the chief of the department I desire by email and get accepted before flying and moving to Sweden, or would I have to find a place to rent and move and register at socialstyrelsen before I would be offered an underläkare position? Är det ett plus om jag lärde mig svenska, vet tyska på B2 nivå och också har ett engelska C2 CPE certifikat?
 

Trauma Surgeon

5+ Year Member
Oct 15, 2012
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So what's the difference of underläkare and AT-läkare? (I can't find the explanation anywhere). I'm interested in a surgical residency in Sweden after I graduate from an EU med school, but in my country (Croatia) after we finish the 6th year we have a 1 year internship after which we pass the state exam to be able to apply for residencies. So, I don't understand whether I would first have to take the state exam here to be able to apply for internship in Sweden or would the 1-year internship followed by a state exam be recognized in Sweden (I hear this isn't the case and everyone who wants an ST-läkare position must pass AT provet i Sverige)? And if I have to do the underläkare internship first in Sweden, would I find a spot by contacting the chief of the department I desire by email and get accepted before flying and moving to Sweden, or would I have to find a place to rent and move and register at socialstyrelsen before I would be offered an underläkare position? Är det ett plus om jag lärde mig svenska, vet tyska på B2 nivå och också har ett engelska C2 CPE certifikat?
So many questions at once, will try to answer them accordingly and hope don't miss one…

In the clinical practice there is no difference between "underläkare" and AT, since they are both under supervision. BUT, as AT the hospital does have a lot of educational responsibilities that have to be met (like ATLS, ACLS courses). This does not apply for underläkare.

If you are from EU, you don't need to do AT, but there is catch, the Swedish system is very closed as I have mentioned in my earlier post, it is all about connections. During AT people get to know you.

NO, you don't need to pass AT exam for residency if you have a valid European Medical Exam/License.

You have to apply for AT positions, these are unlike residency spots coming every year, and the hospital (a group) decides if you get a spot. A chief of surgery can recommend you but he does not give out the spot him self.

Finally, you need to speak fluent Swedish if you want to work in Sweden, German or English will do you no good.
 

madmaxfax

2+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2015
24
3
28
Status
Dentist
How about oral and maxillofacial surgery residency in sweden? so you first do 6 month internship wise and if they approve you, you get accepted in the residency? i dont know swedish, but english proficiency level and german mittelstuffe. Is there a possibility to go to sweden and work there as an intern or dental or omfs assistant and parallel learning the language to obtain the license?one other thing I dont understand. I contacted socialstyrelsen and said that I must get the tissus level C1 in swedish language and then apply for license and then turn to the county councils.
Nevertheless, I ve turned in advance to the coynty councils with numerous e mails inquiries sent and I am waiting for a reply.
The St positions are advertised via the job section of the council?
Sorry for the numerous questions
 

Trauma Surgeon

5+ Year Member
Oct 15, 2012
104
110
Status
Attending Physician
How about oral and maxillofacial surgery residency in sweden? so you first do 6 month internship wise and if they approve you, you get accepted in the residency? i dont know swedish, but english proficiency level and german mittelstuffe. Is there a possibility to go to sweden and work there as an intern or dental or omfs assistant and parallel learning the language to obtain the license?one other thing I dont understand. I contacted socialstyrelsen and said that I must get the tissus level C1 in swedish language and then apply for license and then turn to the county councils.
Nevertheless, I ve turned in advance to the coynty councils with numerous e mails inquiries sent and I am waiting for a reply.
The St positions are advertised via the job section of the council?
Sorry for the numerous questions
MFS is sub-speciality (fellowship) of plastic/ENT. Both hard residencies to obtain in Sweden due to the limited number of residency spots available each year. All residency positions are required by law to be officially advertised, but all positions in surgical fields are field by department prelims (see my previous posts) or is a deal between to department heads.
Internship is between 18-21 months now in Sweden.
You absolutely need to be fluent in Swedish if you want any job in health care in Sweden (maybe not as a lab assistance in a big lab, but then you must be a "rock star" at what you do!).
 

madmaxfax

2+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2015
24
3
28
Status
Dentist
Thank you for your detailed answer and help.I do not know if i am saying right but this is the translation that comes up when I search for the residency I am searching.I am speaking about this residency training. http://www.kkf.nu/1.0.1.0/17/1/
It is stated as the known omfs speciality and that it is a dental speciality. not craniofacial surgery fellowship in which you might be reffering to. another question. Can I with B2 certificate Language apply for a ST position? Can I somehow work as an Assistant either intern for these months and parallel obtaining the language certificates required? my deepest gratitude in advance.
 

Trauma Surgeon

5+ Year Member
Oct 15, 2012
104
110
Status
Attending Physician
What you are looking at/asking for when looking at the website you referring to is oral surgery which is a fellowship of dentistry, to be eligible you have to have worked for 4 years as dentist and been actively involved in research. The fellowship is according to the website 48 months, does not reveal how many spots are available each year. All this information is available on the website, I do NOT have anything to add since I'm not familiar with this fellowship (odontology is a total different pathway than MD here in Sweden!).

Best of luck in your future endeavors!