TBR Ochem book 2 is SO DETAILED. Any advice?!?! :)

ilovemedi

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Nov 21, 2011
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    Hey guys! I've just sorted out my planner an it seems like I wont have much time to getting to the second Ochem book for TBR :(. I've already finished the first ochem book.

    I was wondering, which sections, if any, are most important/ necessary in the second TBR ochem book? It appears to be far too detailed, and I really am in a time crunch so any input in would be helpful. Thanks.
     
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    Swagster

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    Apr 12, 2010
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      Completely agree that book 2 was more useful than book 1. Book 2 has biology incorporated and I thought was really helpful. The lab techniques section was super helpful and let's just say I was really glad I read it in detail. In book 1, I liked the shortcuts for R and S, but found much of it to be remedial, which when you think about it the start of o chem is pure tedium. I'd just do the passages for book 1. For book 2, pay attention to the biological stuff and try to do all of the passages.
       

      BerkReviewTeach

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        As mentioned above, Lab Techniques is essential and it is extremely well presented... worth the time invested. I'd also say that the carbonyls chapter and the biologically-related material in the nitrogen chapter are essential. The carbohydrate passages are good to look at, but with organic being lightly tested, I probably wouldn't do them all if I was preparing.
         

        RC4L

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        Jul 29, 2013
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          You need to cover everything in ochem but you have to spend your time wisely as well. Look at it like this.. Ochem constitutes at most one half of the BS section of the MCAT(usually much less) and the ochem is quite general. Would it be advantageous to spend such a large amount of time going through that entire Berkeley ochem book when you can cover the same material in less detail and in far less time from a book like EK? I said this on a different thread and a few others agreed that we could have reviewed the EK ochem book for an hour prior to taking the mcat and been completely prepared for all the ochem on the exam. Not to say that this is a standard with the exam but it just doesn't make sense to go into the detail that Berkeley review offers in their ochem books while studying for the mcat. Their books rival undergrad ochem books at times and such an understanding of ochem rarely pays off on the mcat. Don't take what I'm saying as ochem is not important but rather not as valuble to understand in detail like subjects you would see in PS or BS. I've taken 3 mcats and the only ochem I have ever seen was sn1/sn2/e1/e2, stereochem, IR, basic lab techniques, basic reactions, and some basic biochem. I have personally never seen more than 2 passages and a handful of discretes with ochem as well. Others have had different experiences so take what I am saying with a grain of salt. Just keep in mind that there are different sources that can prepare you adequately and in far less time. Also remember that if you don't feel ready when the exam rolls around, postpone!
           

          RC4L

          Full Member
          Jul 29, 2013
          347
          70
          1. Pre-Medical
            You need to cover everything in ochem but you have to spend your time wisely as well. Look at it like this.. Ochem constitutes at most one half of the BS section of the MCAT(usually much less) and the ochem is quite general. Would it be advantageous to spend such a large amount of time going through that entire Berkeley ochem book when you can cover the same material in less detail and in far less time from a book like EK? I said this on a different thread and a few others agreed that we could have reviewed the EK ochem book for an hour prior to taking the mcat and been completely prepared for all the ochem on the exam. Not to say that this is a standard with the exam but it just doesn't make sense to go into the detail that Berkeley review offers in their ochem books while studying for the mcat. Their books rival undergrad ochem books at times and such an understanding of ochem rarely pays off on the mcat. Don't take what I'm saying as ochem is not important but rather not as valuble to understand in detail like subjects you would see in PS or BS. I've taken 3 mcats and the only ochem I have ever seen was sn1/sn2/e1/e2, stereochem, IR, basic lab techniques, basic reactions, and some basic biochem. I have personally never seen more than 2 passages and a handful of discretes with ochem as well. Others have had different experiences so take what I am saying with a grain of salt. Just keep in mind that there are different sources that can prepare you adequately and in far less time. Also remember that if you don't feel ready when the exam rolls around, postpone!
             
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