• Livestream AMA: Join SDN as we welcome Dr. John Ligon, a Pediatric Oncologist with the National Cancer Institute on May 11th at 8:00 PM Eastern. Register now!

hikermoose

2+ Year Member
May 17, 2018
5
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Hey everyone.

I am looking to take the MCAT in early to mid summer of next year. I know it isn't quite time to start a study plan, plus I will not take my first biochemistry class until this fall, but I am planning to go ahead and get the TBR books now, so that I can begin refreshing on other subjects this summer so I am better prepared for a full study plan next spring. Cost isn't much of an issue with this purchase, so I'd like to get the full set so nothing is left out.

So here is my main question....

Would purchasing the TBR books now (2020 editions, except biology and CARS both with 2019 editions according to the TBR website) be ok to use to study for a 2022 test? I read somewhere here on SDN that the TBR doesn't update their books every year so I get the feeling it will be ok and not end up being a waste of money. Any help is welcome. Thank you!
 

KnightDoc

2+ Year Member
Mar 14, 2019
5,119
5,595
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Hey everyone.

I am looking to take the MCAT in early to mid summer of next year. I know it isn't quite time to start a study plan, plus I will not take my first biochemistry class until this fall, but I am planning to go ahead and get the TBR books now, so that I can begin refreshing on other subjects this summer so I am better prepared for a full study plan next spring. Cost isn't much of an issue with this purchase, so I'd like to get the full set so nothing is left out.

So here is my main question....

Would purchasing the TBR books now (2020 editions, except biology and CARS both with 2019 editions according to the TBR website) be ok to use to study for a 2022 test? I read somewhere here on SDN that the TBR doesn't update their books every year so I get the feeling it will be ok and not end up being a waste of money. Any help is welcome. Thank you!
It will be fine unless they change the test, and there is no indication that they will do so. The test has been basically the same since 2015, so any books released since then will cover the appropriate content.

Most vendors, like Kaplan and Princeton Review, sell the same books every year with new dates. The nice thing about TBR is that they don't change the date unless they actually add something to the book. Even if they improve the books between now and 2022, you will be fine unless AAMC makes changes to the test. I'm pretty sure they give plenty of heads-up before doing so, but I wasn't around pre-2015, so I don't know for sure.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

MedSchoolTutors

Top MCAT/USMLE/COMLEX Tutors Answer Your Questions
Vendor
2+ Year Member
Apr 25, 2019
1,316
1,241
www.medschooltutors.com
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
  2. Resident [Any Field]
  3. Attending Physician
Seconding the previous commenter- for the most part, any books post 2015 from the same company will be the same/similar.

Kevin W, MCAT Tutor
Med School Tutors
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
About the Ads
Dec 15, 2020
8
2
good to know, makes me feel better in case I push back. Does anyone actually ever get through all these passages?!?! I just got mine and am feeling overwhelmed 😳 Does it matter what subject to start?
 

BerkReviewTeach

Company Rep & Bad Singer
Vendor
10+ Year Member
May 25, 2007
3,968
777
good to know, makes me feel better in case I push back. Does anyone actually ever get through all these passages?!?! I just got mine and am feeling overwhelmed 😳 Does it matter what subject to start?
Almost no one gets through all of the passages and questions (something like 6600). You're not meant to do every question; you're meant to do enough to become highly proficient at a topic, which could be a few questions for material you know well and a lot of questions for material you need more work on.

You need to see the book as a tool for mastering everything on the exam rather than a collection of questions that must be completed to be ready. The idea of having to get them all done is unnecessarily stressful.

This philosophy is that of our founder, Todd Bennett (the guy who writes all the chemistry and physics and the cool tricks). We put so many passages and question in them so that (1) you have more than enough practice in the areas where you need a lot and (2) you have plenty of study questions in case you end up postponing your exam for some reason. Todd's approach is that you learn from applying what you know to questions, and the text is there for reference to go back to if you need it. With each of the three phases, you master an essential skill. Content first through phase 1 where questions rely heavily on knowing the concepts, definitions, equations, and theories. From there you master timing and passage analysis in phase 2, where the passages and questions integrate material from other chapters and require more interpretation of graphs, tables, and charts. Lastly in phase 3, you deal with the most realistic passages and questions of all, where you are applying the concepts to scenarios you may have never seen before, exactly like what you'll experience on your MCAT.

My advice is that you plan to do a little of each phase (1, 2, and 3 for every chapter) and only complete the phases on subjects that you struggle with. I'd also recommend you watch some of Todd's videos on youtube. Best chemistry teacher you'll ever see. If you can find the one about how to use the books, it will really help.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Oct 15, 2020
77
268
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
I wouldn’t use a book series from right after the test change. I can’t speak for every company, but the prep company I did content development for rushed the initial series to be quick out the gate, and did a more substantial rewrite years later to improve quality. But I think a 2019/2020 series should be totally fine!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Jack-Kennedy35

2+ Year Member
Jul 19, 2017
157
19
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Almost no one gets through all of the passages and questions (something like 6600). You're not meant to do every question; you're meant to do enough to become highly proficient at a topic, which could be a few questions for material you know well and a lot of questions for material you need more work on.

You need to see the book as a tool for mastering everything on the exam rather than a collection of questions that must be completed to be ready. The idea of having to get them all done is unnecessarily stressful.

This philosophy is that of our founder, Todd Bennett (the guy who writes all the chemistry and physics and the cool tricks). We put so many passages and question in them so that (1) you have more than enough practice in the areas where you need a lot and (2) you have plenty of study questions in case you end up postponing your exam for some reason. Todd's approach is that you learn from applying what you know to questions, and the text is there for reference to go back to if you need it. With each of the three phases, you master an essential skill. Content first through phase 1 where questions rely heavily on knowing the concepts, definitions, equations, and theories. From there you master timing and passage analysis in phase 2, where the passages and questions integrate material from other chapters and require more interpretation of graphs, tables, and charts. Lastly in phase 3, you deal with the most realistic passages and questions of all, where you are applying the concepts to scenarios you may have never seen before, exactly like what you'll experience on your MCAT.

My advice is that you plan to do a little of each phase (1, 2, and 3 for every chapter) and only complete the phases on subjects that you struggle with. I'd also recommend you watch some of Todd's videos on youtube. Best chemistry teacher you'll ever see. If you can find the one about how to use the books, it will really help.

I have already studied last year, but due to COVID related circumstances I couldn't take the exam. Nonetheless, I had my content down during this time using Kaplan alone, but I'd like to do things different this time around and have already bought the TBR book set.

Can you please advice if the best bet for me is to read through my previous content notes I took last year from reading the Kaplan books, and do the associated questions from the associated TBR chapters? Please let me know if you can offer any other advice, as I am relying on TBR for much needed practice.

Thanks!
 

jhmmd

supernatural
Apr 28, 2020
1,637
1,160
conscious to a flood
good to know, makes me feel better in case I push back. Does anyone actually ever get through all these passages?!?! I just got mine and am feeling overwhelmed 😳 Does it matter what subject to start?
You gotta break it down. Make a spreadsheet, create a notebook in OneNote, something to keep yourself accountable. Med school is like drinking from a fire hydrant so use that intimidation to your advantage and push through it! :)
 
About the Ads

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.