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Test your knowledge on RNA

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jackal head

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Why can you dissolve RNA in an alkaline solution such as NaOH but not DNA?

I don't know the answer :(

Any links to some place that would have?
 

Artful Dodger

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I'm not totally certain, but...does it have anything to do with hydrogen bonding?
Hydroxyl groups make RNA less stable than DNA...so it's harder to dissolve
 

jackal head

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I'm not totally certain, but...does it have anything to do with hydrogen bonding?
Hydroxyl groups make RNA less stable than DNA...so it's harder to dissolve

Perhaps, I know for a fact it has something to do with the structure (I know that sounds obvious :confused: )
 

Artful Dodger

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Yeah...it sounds like a Biochemistry question, which I haven't taken yet. Just using what I know from lower-div sci classes to answer this question. I know that RNA & DNA are structurally different though...RNA is single-stranded and DNA is double-stranded. So, if you take that notion alone (without adding a strand of RNA to another one), you'd realize DNA was a stronger OH bond, thus harder to dissolve or for NaOH to ionize it.
 

optimistic828

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chapter 12-slide 29

lecture from 11-21-08

go back to those notes-- i found the answer there

youre on the right track, it has to do with the structure and how it is different from DNA
 

WhiteSnows

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Because RNA has OH- group which is attacked by NaOH nucleaphilic. DNA does not have OH group so it is more stable thn RNA.
 

lnmichelle

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DNA can be dissolved in NaOH,but RNA is not stable in basic condition.
 
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fenixtnlfan

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I know that RNA & DNA are structurally different though...RNA is single-stranded and DNA is double-stranded.

Just thought I'd point out RNA does exist as double-stranded, ie viral genomes or RNAi. DNA can be single-stranded, but that's usually only from artificial lab conditions. Probably not something you will learn in a basic bio course, but I figured I might as well pass some of my knowledge from getting a bachelors on :laugh:

Because RNA has OH- group which is attacked by NaOH nucleaphilic. DNA does not have OH group so it is more stable thn RNA.

I think this is correct. If you google something about the stability of RNA in alkaline conditions there is some more detailed info.
 

Storm90

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"RNA is highly susceptible to base-catalyzed hydrolysis. The base-induced deprotonation of the 2'-OH group facilitates its nucleophilic attack on the adjacent phosphorus atom, thereby cleaving the RNA backbone. The resulting 2',3'-cyclic phosphate group subsequently hydrolyzes to produce a 2'- or 3'-nucleotide product. DNA is not susceptible to such degradation because it lacks a 2'-OH group." I just reviewed this last week. Hope it helps.
 
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