Napoleon1801

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Anyone have opinions on the best science books for first and second years? No, I'm not talking about BRS or NMS books either. I'm wanting to know what are biggest and best comprehensive texts are out there. I already have a Netter from undergrad anatomy and I'm contemplating getting a photo atlas as well. So far I have found a really good histo and immunology text. Any rec's for biochem, embryo, physio, or neuro?



thanks
 

japhy

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with the current rapid pace of advances in medicine, textbooks are a waste of time and money. the only text you may want for the first two years is a robbins pathology text.

reading textbooks in med school is a great way to insure you do poorly on the exam. med school studying is all about learning the high yield material; that's all you have time for...
 

klubguts

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i agree with japhy...the only textbooks i used during the basic science years were Moore's clinical anatomy and Robbins pathology...honestly, you don't have the time to read large texts when you have exams every couple of weeks over large volumes of selected material. From my experience, we would receive a compact, in depth syllabus for each block that had more information in it then i could typically learn prior to the exam.
 

nishariz

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japhy is right, but personally (as a first year) the books i used to clarify material in the syllabi are:
Netter's for anatomy
wheater's functional histology
the human brain by nolte (for neuroscience)
- i didn't use any books for biochem or physiology
 

felipe5

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well said everyone........netter's is good, and moore and dalley is also, especially if your profs are like mine and absolutely love the material in the blue boxes. I have a Rohen's atlas that I like to use to prep for cadaver lab, but its by no means necessary at all. I suggest you ask M2's at your school as I'm sure this kind of advice can be better tailored to your situation by someone who's already been there :horns:
 

Surgeonizer

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The Essentials:

Anatomy--Netter's (even though some of the cartoons are incorrect)
Pathology--Robbins (the best medical textbook ever written)
Embryology--Langmann's Medical Embryology

A portable medical dictionary
 

the_equalizer

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I would also look into a physiology book, your understanding of path may be limited by your physio foundation. Costanzo is ok for physio, but look at a real textbook for topics you feel are not covered well or deserve more attn. Resp I think is weak in Costanzo, and I'd look at a phsio book for cardio and renal. My school uses Boron and Boulpaep, so that's all I know, but I'm sure there are many other decent texts out there.

You really have to decide how you want to look at your first 2 years. Either you do like the previous posters have suggested and you just focus on relevant clinically important stuff, or you spend the time learning things to a level of detail that may seem unnecessary. The point is, when else will you have the time to spend this much time on biochem, physio, immuno, or whatever. You're not going to easily have the time to crack open a textbook and read through it nice and slow, instead you'll hunt down review articles, etc... and get it done as quickly as possible.
 

japhy

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i can certainly understand wanting to know, in excruciating detail, how everything works - in biochem, phys, etc. one of my good friends takes this approach. while maddening at exam time, he has a great understanding. reference books are great when there is a concept that you can't grasp because it is presented too simply in brs phys.

however, at some point you will realize that this info is not clinically relevant - it does not impact your decision making one bit, nor does it affect patient outcomes. and you haven't slept in 30 hours...

at this point the minutiae cease to be relevant, much less important. further, and i am not being facetious here, the students who got honors in 1st/2nd year were not the ones reading textbooks. they were the ones focusing on the highest yield material and the syllabus.
 

the_equalizer

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If the question is how to get the highest grades possible, then japhy may be right. However, if you want to build up your store of medical knowledge, you do that with textbooks. You do it with articles, conferences, reviews, and lectures. That's where you pick up the little, rare, random things that differentiate a good doctor from a great one. That's what you gives you the insight to see that an inconspicuous rash on someone's leg, taken in a certain context, is acutally a finding in 1-5% of patients affected w/ some random disease. Any and all doctors on the wards, from interns on up, should know the "high yield" stuff, the minor points or rare findings that get 1 or 2 lines in some huge textbook can separate them, and can make a difference in a patients outcome.

The point is, you have to do what you feel comfortable with. If you don't want to read big books don't, you won't retain anything if your heart isn't in it. Know what you've got to know cold, and the little things will fall into place.

If all doctors have the same basic "clinically important" knowledge, which they should, I'd want the one who went through 1000's of pgs of seemingly irrelevant but possibly one day useful material treating me.
 

saanjana

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hmm...i know you specifically mentioned no review books, but I think Lippincott's Biochemistry is a great book for medical biochemistry - great clinical correlations, and awesome diagrams.

I think if you have the time, then Guyton is a great book for Physiology. For respiratory, the small West book is awesome.
 

quideam

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I'll add:

Physiology - Costanzo (not the BRS, the big one)
Biochem - Lippincott's

Both of these are great, good explanations, diagrams, etc. Costanzo especially is a god-send
 

jUxTaPoSiTiOn

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japhy said:
with the current rapid pace of advances in medicine, textbooks are a waste of time and money. the only text you may want for the first two years is a robbins pathology text.

reading textbooks in med school is a great way to insure you do poorly on the exam. med school studying is all about learning the high yield material; that's all you have time for...
Is it the 1500 pg Robbins path text? or the Review book? or do you suggest BOTH?
 

japhy

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However, if you want to build up your store of medical knowledge, you do that with textbooks.
yeah, if you want dated material that is in many cases just plain wrong.:thumbdown:
furthermore, possessing reams of useless information does not make one a great doctor, nor does it differentiate a great doctor from just a merely good one. being able to apply the information you do have to novel situations is much more important; i.e., being able to think on your feet.

i do agree with you with regards to journals, conferences, etc. this is the material that both helps you build your store of medical knowledge and is timely. it doesn't do you any good to study from a textbook, with information that is only partially correct.
 

TheRussian

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I'll add a good book for immunology.
Basic immunology by Abbas

It's small and it is self explanatory. Simplifies immuno to what you really need to know.

I'll also add that baby Moore is good to have as a reference only.
Also Physical Diagnosis by Swartz is a good reference for practicing physical exams
 

AlbertConstable

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So where do you find the high yield stuff if the syllabus isn't too detailed. I wouldn't mind doing well during MS1 and 2 but I'd rather just be very well prepared for Step 1.

Basically, is the high yield stuff for class and boards the same and if so, where do I find this list of info to learn when I begin MS1 next Fall?
 

nishariz

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i personally use class notes and the board review series (BRS) books to study. I'll make notes in these BRS books along with studying class material (which for some reason can be quite different at times). That way, when it comes time for boards (dreading it) i'll have my own notes in the BRS books to study.
hope that helps




AlbertConstable said:
So where do you find the high yield stuff if the syllabus isn't too detailed. I wouldn't mind doing well during MS1 and 2 but I'd rather just be very well prepared for Step 1.

Basically, is the high yield stuff for class and boards the same and if so, where do I find this list of info to learn when I begin MS1 next Fall?