PugsAndHugs

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Has anyone read "The DO's" by Norman Gevitz? Its great book on how osteopathy was discovered and the history of it, but I feel like it makes it seem like osteopathy is some sort of miracle cure that can cure everything, especially in the first couple of paragraphs. This is the only aspect of the book I did not like. If anyone else read it I'm curious to see what you think.
 

DoctorSynthesis

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Has anyone read "The DO's" by Norman Gevitz? Its great book on how osteopathy was discovered and the history of it, but I feel like it makes it seem like osteopathy is some sort of miracle cure that can cure everything, especially in the first couple of paragraphs. This is the only aspect of the book I did not like. If anyone else read it I'm curious to see what you think.
Read it. Thought it gave an objective view/history of osteopathy. Gevitz talked about negatives alot.
 
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The_Bird

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I've read a good chunk, but alas schoolwork. Good and in depth history from what I think is an unbiased perspective. I don't see the "miracle cure" attitude that you do, but I've yet to finish the book...
 
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I found it to be good from a historical perspective and to see the evolution of osteopathic medicine. However, you can definitely see at times when his bias does show. Overall I found it informative.
 

allantois

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It was an interesting insight into the mind of someone who thinks that the sky is falling.

Btw, Norman Gevits supports residencies based out of community physician offices.
 
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Has anyone read "The DO's" by Norman Gevitz? Its great book on how osteopathy was discovered and the history of it, but I feel like it makes it seem like osteopathy is some sort of miracle cure that can cure everything, especially in the first couple of paragraphs. This is the only aspect of the book I did not like. If anyone else read it I'm curious to see what you think.
I agree.
I thought the book was overrated.
 
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ChiTownBHawks

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I think every DO student-to-be/ med student should read it just to get an overview of where we were. But, the dude drinks too much of the kool-aid for my liking.

Still, it's a great historical piece if you read it as such.
 

Shammyguy3

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I have about 70 pages left to read, it's decent. Definitely lends enough insight to the history of DO without being too dry.
 

AM508

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It provided a good historical background of ostepathic medicine. It was pretty dry, but I found what I learned in there valuable when interviews came around.
 

GUH

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It's the best overview of the evolution of osteopathic medical education, practice, and licensing that I've read.
 
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The book gets boring after the first few chapters and its all politics. Again,I think the book is vastly overrated in terms of assisting you with your interviews in terms of supplementing your answers.
 

OrdinaryDO

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I liked it. I enjoyed learning about the history and paths traveled by A.T Still. Very unique and inspirational individual. What a visionary he was.
 
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hopefulERdoc251

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The book gets boring after the first few chapters and its all politics. Again,I think the book is vastly overrated in terms of assisting you with your interviews in terms of supplementing your answers.
I found it the complete opposite! I was able to draw on some of the specifics of the book ( the Cali merger, the resiliency of Still and the profession, talking about how he drew from all the other fields like homeopathy, hydropathy ect to come to his own theory). Also, most DO's that are practicing have read this book. My one interviewer said that when she read my app, she looked at her book and saw her acceptance letter to the college she attended and a note her nephew gave her when she got in. Even though it didn't help me per say, she associated that with my application. Also, many people have skimmed through the book, and it's easy to tell who has from talking to them. If you genuinely read the book and talk about it at an interview, they'll know and it'll only help you.
 

AM508

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[...]..Also, many people have skimmed through the book, and it's easy to tell who has from talking to them. If you genuinely read the book and talk about it at an interview, they'll know and it'll only help you.
This.
 

Spirit of the Student Doc

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Cost me $18 on Kindle........ not cheap.

Seems interesting so far.
 
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If you're going to be an osteopathic physician then you need to be able to explain a thorough history of your profession. "The DOs" provides a good history and a lot of good talking points on the history of medicine in general. Read it if you want to be able to hold a conversation with people about what you're doing. You will get "What's a DO?" and "Why is it separate from MD?" a million times in your career. If you don't know how to intelligently answer that question you're gonna miss some opportunities.
 
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^nothing google wouldn't do imo. It may help some but in my (limited) experience, it didnt help. It however gave me a greater appreaciation of the profression and how far it has come.
 

cbrons

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I think H.L. Mencken's history of "Osteopaths" was much better.

"This preposterous quackery flourishes lushIy in the back reaches of the Republic, and begins to conquer the less civilized folk of the big cities. As the old-time family doctor dies out in the country towns, with no competent successor willing to take over his dismal business, he is followed by some hearty blacksmith or ice-wagon driver, turned into a chiropractor in six months, often by correspondence. In Los Angeles the Damned, there are probably more chiropractors than actual physicians, and they are far more generally esteemed. Proceeding from the Ambassador Hotel to the heart of the town, along Wilshire boulevard, one passes scores of their gaudy signs; there are even chiropractic "hospitals." The Mormons who pour in from the prairies and deserts, most of them ailing, patronize these "hospitals" copiously, and give to the chiropractic pathology the same high respect that they accord to the theology of the town sorcerers. That pathology is grounded upon the doctrine that all human ills are caused by pressure of misplaced vertebrae upon the nerves which come out of the spinal cord -- in other words, that every disease is the result of a pinch. This, plainly enough, is buncombe. The chiropractic therapeutics rest upon the doctrine that the way to get rid of such pinches is to climb upon a table and submit to a heroic pummeling by a retired piano-mover. This, obviously, is buncombe doubly damned.

Both doctrines were launched upon the world by an old quack named Andrew T. Still, the father of osteopathy. For years the osteopaths merchanted them, and made money at the trade. But as they grew opulent they grew ambitious, i.e., they began to study anatomy and physiology. The result was a gradual abandonment of Papa Still's ideas. The high-toned osteopath of today is a sort of eclectic. He tries anything that promises to work, from tonsillectomy to the x-rays. With four years' training behind him, he probably knows more anatomy than the average graduate of the Johns Hopkins Medical School, or at all events, more osteology. Thus enlightened, he seldom has much to say about pinched nerves in the back. But as he abandoned the Still revelation it was seized by the chiropractors, led by another quack, one Palmer. This Palmer grabbed the pinched nerve nonsense and began teaching it to ambitious farm-hands and out-at-elbow Baptist preachers in a few easy lessons. Today the backwoods swarm with chiropractors, and in most States they have been able to exert enough pressure on the rural politicians to get themselves licensed. [It is not altogether a matter of pressure. Large numbers of rustic legislators are themselves believers in chiropractic. So are many members of Congress.] Any lout with strong hands and arms is perfectly equipped to become a chiropractor. No education beyond the elements is necessary. The takings are often high, and so the profession has attracted thousands of recruits -- retired baseball players, work-weary plumbers, truck-drivers, longshoremen, bogus dentists, dubious preachers, cashiered school superintendents. Now and then a quack of some other school -- say homeopathy -- plunges into it. Hundreds of promising students come from the intellectual ranks of hospital orderlies.

Such quackeries suck in the botched, and help them on to bliss eternal. When these botched fall into the hands of competent medical men they are very likely to be patched up and turned loose upon the world, to beget their kind. But massaged along the backbone to cure their lues [syphylis], they quickly pass into the last stages, and so their pathogenic heritage perishes with them. What is too often forgotten is that nature obviously intends the botched to die, and that every interference with that benign process is full of dangers. That the labors of quacks tend to propagate epidemics and so menace the lives of all of us, as is alleged by their medical opponents -- this I doubt. The fact is that most infectious diseases of any seriousness throw out such alarming symptoms and so quickly that no sane chiropractor is likely to monkey with them. Seeing his patient breaking out in pustules, or choking, or falling into a stupor, he takes to the woods at once, and leaves the business to the nearest medical man. His trade is mainly with ambulant patients; they must come to his studio for treatment. Most of them have lingering diseases; they tour all the neighborhood doctors before they reach him. His treatment, being nonsensical, is in accord with the divine plan. It is seldom, perhaps, that he actually kills a patient, but at all events he keeps any a worthy soul from getting well.

The osteopaths, I fear, are finding this new competition serious and unpleasant. As I have said, it was their Hippocrates, the late Dr. Still, who invented all of the thrusts, lunges, yanks, hooks and bounces that the lowly chiropractors now employ with such vast effect, and for years the osteopaths had a monopoly of them. But when they began to grow scientific and ambitious their course of training was lengthened until it took in all sorts of tricks and dodges borrowed from the regular doctors, or resurrection men, including the plucking of tonsils, adenoids and appendices, the use of the stomach-pump, and even some of the legerdemain of psychiatry. They now harry their students furiously, and turn them out ready for anything from growing hair on a bald head to frying a patient with the x-rays. All this new striving, of course, quickly brought its inevitable penalties. The osteopathic graduate, having sweated so long, was no longer willing to take a case of delirium tremens for $2, and in consequence he lost patients. Worse, very few aspirants could make the long grade. The essence of osteopathy itself could be grasped by any lively farmhand or night watchman in a few weeks, but the borrowed magic baffled him. Confronted by the phenomenon of gastrulation, or by the curious behavior of heart muscle, or by any of the current theories of immunity, he commonly took refuge, like his brother of the orthodox faculty, in a gulp of laboratory alcohol, or fled the premises altogether. Thus he was lost to osteopathic science, and the chiropractors took him in; nay, they welcomed him. He was their meat. Borrowing that primitive part of osteopathy which was comprehensible to the meanest understanding, they threw the rest overboard, at the same time denouncing it as a sorcery invented by the Medical Trust. Thus they gathered in the garage m


http://www.chirobase.org/12Hx/mencken.html
 
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Gevitz has more details on the Palmers:

IMPOSTORS AND IMITATORS

... Quite a different problem, however, was presented by those individuals practicing what appeared to many to be osteopathy under a different name. The most numerous of these were the exponents of chiropractic, founded by Daniel David Palmer (1845–1913). According to Palmer the principles of this system were fashioned by him in 1895, while he was making a living as a magnetic healer in Davenport, Iowa... In 1906 he was convicted of practicing medicine without a license and was sentenced to spend six months in jail. During his incarceration, his school was taken over by his son, Bartlett Joshua Palmer (1881–1961). The two were better known as BJ and DD. When DD was released, BJ squeezed him out of the college, whereupon DD tried without success to operate schools elsewhere. Returning to private practice, the elder Palmer wrote a massive textbook, a significant portion of which was devoted to a diatribe against his son. Bitter feelings between the two remained strong. At a founder’s day parade held in Davenport in August of 1913, the uninvited DD, marching on foot, was struck from behind by an auto driven by BJ. DD died a few months later, with some of his followers convinced that his death was a consequence of his injuries. Under the younger Palmer the school continued to grow, securing many matriculants by sensational advertising—a practice BJ encouraged his followers to emulate. By 1916 there reportedly were some fourteen hundred students in attendance, taking one year’s training leading to a doctorate in chiropractic, or DC, degree. For those who could not appear in person, a correspondence course was instituted.

Many early chiropractors were arrested on the charge of practicing osteopathy without a license. Unlike those with fake DO diplomas, however, chiropractors claimed that they were not pretending to be osteopaths and were therefore innocent of any offense. In court they cited a number of differences between the two systems. The DOs, they pointed out, commonly adjusted several vertebrae to treat a given disorder; they invariably adjusted but one. The technique also varied. Osteopathic manipulations were based on the lever principle, namely, the application of pressure on one part of the body to overcome resistance in motion elsewhere. This meant twisting the patient’s torso in certain directions while maintaining a steady hold upon the point to be influenced. The most common chiropractic procedure of the era had the client lying prone with little, if any support below the spine. The operator would then place both hands directly over a vertebral segment that was believed to be “subluxated” and administered a quick thrust downward with all possible force. In court, when DO witnesses were called to the stand, they would often testify that this method was crude and dangerous and would not be employed in osteopathic practice. Such statements, however, unintentionally worked to the chiropractors’ advantage, since they indicated to juries that there were indeed divergences in approach. With respect to the element of danger, the defendants were only too glad to present patients who had been so treated, attesting to the safety of such maneuvers. To further cement their position, some chiropractors cleverly managed to obtain and circulate signed letters by officials of recognized DO-granting schools stating that a course of chiropractic was not the same as one in osteopathy. As a result of these tactics, they generally won acquittal.

Since the courts were beginning to establish the chiropractors’ right to engage in their livelihood outside the jurisdiction of either the medical or osteopathic licensure acts, several legislatures realized that unless they passed laws recognizing the group, their states would be inundated with diploma mill graduates. In 1913, despite vigorous lobbying of MDs and DOs alike, Kansas and Arkansas became the first to enact chiropractic bills. Each required for licensure an eighteen-month course of personal instruction at a duly chartered college. By 1922 twenty other states had similar statutes. At this time the number of DCs legally and illegally in practice probably exceeded the number of osteopaths in the country...
 

Torilynn92

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This thread is so interesting! I have the first two aforementioned books; does anybody else have any other recommendations? I'm less interested in learning about Still, Palmer, etc and more interested in seeing the perspective of a modern D.O! Are there any fantastic DO authors out there? :)
 

sonofva

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It was an interesting insight into the mind of someone who thinks that the sky is falling.

Btw, Norman Gevits supports residencies based out of community physician offices.
I honestly don't see a problem with this for family practice residency.