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lesstalkmorock

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Does anywhere know a good place to get a list of reactions (that lists out reagents, type of reaction, etc)

This is for organic 2, so preferably covers alcohols, carbonyls, aromatics.

I know the material pretty well, I would just like to see all the reactions in front of me at one time.

MAD CRAZY KARMA if you can help!

Thanks in advance!
 

MErc44

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buy the book Organic Chemistry by Paula Yurkanis Bruice. It has summaries at the end of each chapter with all the reactions. She was my teacher at UCSB and we had to know around 50 reactions for one of our finals. Its a good book anyway.
 
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musiclink213

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MErc44 said:
buy the book Organic Chemistry by Paula Yurkanis Bruice. It has summaries at the end of each chapter with all the reactions. She was my teacher at UCSB and we had to know around 50 reactions for one of our finals. Its a good book anyway.
that's the book that we use! although, no offense to your prof., but a lot of the reactions are the same exact thing. it's better to understand the mechanisms, IMO.

for the OP, check out http://www.chemhelper.com/mechanisms.html it's a bunch of mechanisms for different reactions.
 

lizzylu

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I understand what you mean about needing to see all the reactions in front of you. What I did in ochem (and then later passed on to my students during a review session) was make an entire chart (yes it requires a big piece of paper or small writing) of how to get from one thing to the next, and the backwards info if I knew it. I think I started in the middle w/ a generic C=C bond, then branched off from there.

If I hadn't thrown everything away last year I'd scan it for you. But it's quite impressive. I swear if you set aside a few hours, make the chart, it'll help immensely for the final :)
 
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