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ici_cute

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Dec 21, 2000
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Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  1. Resident [Any Field]
    Hi, obviously most of you if not all are from the West. I'm from Malaysia, and would like to know if pre-med also means matriculation and how long is the course? What is MCAT?

    I'm attending a local University, and I'm lucky to get into it. To study abroad, it's either money or 3.5 in A-level or 5As in STPM (which I think is one hell of a 2 year course), but now matriculation.

    My matriculation is one year (actually 10 months!) that also include Mathematics (quite fun!) and physics. Then medical school is 5 years without repeating. I'm in the first year, barely living it, but striving.

    Know anyone from Malaysia at the place you are studying? Most of the students in Malaysia study abroad in UK. I just really like to know how it is there in US mainly.

    [email protected]

    [This message has been edited by ici_cute (edited 01-30-2001).]
     

    tussy

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    Feb 13, 1999
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    Canada
    1. Attending Physician
      Hi ici-cute. I'll try to answer a few of your questions. First of all, there are about 10 Malaysian students in my class, and there are Malaysian students in many other Canadian universities. These students are sponsored by the Malaysian government and although they train here, they must return home after graduation.

      The MCAT is a standardized exam that all students have to take before applying to medical school in Canada and United States.

      Pre-med is the time spent in university before attending medical school. Most medical schools require between 2 and 4 years of university prior to applying to medical school.

      HOpe this answers some of your questions.
       

      gower

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        A key feature in the previous reply is that most of the students are sponsored by the Maylasian government. Presumably, the others come from wealthy families.

        Unless you are a US citizen or permanent resident of the US, you are not eligible for financial aid should you be accepted. You and your family have to pay; some medical schools will want all four year's tuition placed in an escrow account from which only the medical school can withdraw funds for your tuition expens
         
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        turtleboard

        SDN Advisor
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        Jun 4, 1999
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        New York, New York
        1. Resident [Any Field]
          Following up on gower's post, unless you are a US citizen or a permanent resident (i.e., have a green card) of the US, your application won't be considered for admission to practically all MD and DO programs. I believe a backdoor MAY BE through an MD/PhD or DO/PhD program, but my certainty is a bit iffy.


          Tim W. of N.Y.C.
           

          CHM

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            Hi here...

            You might want to try the International Medical University route. It's cheaper and will take 4 1/2 to 5 years through US and Canadian schools. Canadian grads have a good chance of doing residency in the US too. I graduated from a Canadian Uni through IMU and is currently applying for a residency program in the US. I like the north American modal of training as it gives you a more hands on training and you actually be part of the team and learn to manage patients' care even in 3rd year.

            The difference between specializing in the US vs. UK system is the training program. The US system has a set program (eg 4 yrs for Ob/Gyn, 3 yrs ER) which you have to complete your training. In the UK system I believe it's up to you when you take the exams (can take up to 10 years). But 1 advantage of the UK system is you have a more generalised training with housemanship and all before you specialise.

            Hope this helps. You're welcome to email me if there are further questions.
             
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