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oncogene2

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Aug 24, 2006
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Hi .
I am trying to work on my thesis and want to finsh within 6 months.You think its a possiblity .I am so confused since it does not have struture .Can anyone who has worked on their thesis guide me regrading the whole process and how did you timleline it.
How does one write the Literature review.U have articels but .............
Waitng to hear from someone .
 

namazu

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Hi oncogene,

I'll assume for the moment that this is a serious question.

The short answer is that 6 months might be a lot of time, or it might not be enough. It depends a lot on your topic and how you plan to approach it.

It also depends on your program, and you should check with your advisor or program director for more specific information. The program or school's website may provide a template or additional guidance. Some MPH capstone projects involve writing up a summary of an internship or work experience, while others are more like formal theses. Since you've suggested you're trying to write a thesis, we'll go with that...

Have you chosen a topic? That's the place to start. Find out what is known, and try to locate people in your school or elsewhere who can give you advice on this topic.

Is your plan to do research on this topic in a lab, to develop some kind of theoretical model, to analyze some data, to design or implement a pilot public health program, to create educational materials, to draft a policy statement, or simply to write a review of the literature? For any of these, start by gathering articles that are relevant -- it sounds like you may have done this already. Take a look at the introduction sections of these papers. They provide an overview of the topic, with emphasis on their particular research question. In your thesis, you want to start out with something similar (but probably longer and more detailed) - a review and synthesis of what's been published or implemented, particularly those aspects that have led you to choose this topic. What are the unanswered questions? Where is there an opportunity for improvement? Etc. (If your whole project is a literature review, you can stop right there.)

If you're doing some kind of lab or data analysis, you need to describe the methods in detail. Similarly, if you are designing a theoretical model, or a public health program, you should explain what problems you are addressing, and why you have chosen to design your model or program the way you have.

Then provide your results (if you have them). (For a program proposal, you might suggest what data would be needed to evaluate the program's effectiveness and efficiency, and perhaps wrap up the thesis there with a summary.)

Finally, discuss the results and explain the conclusions you would draw from them. What have you learned? What work still needs to be done to build upon your results? How do your results fit with what others have seen?

As far as pacing goes, it depends a lot on how quickly you can find articles, read, and write. Here are some additional time-limiting steps and other things to keep in mind:

- You will need to obtain approval from your institution's ethical review board if you're doing research with people, human data, or samples, and with the animal care and use committee if you're working with animals. This can take a few days to a few months, depending on how overworked the board is and whether or not you are asked to make revisions to your plan. If your project falls into one of these categories, you cannot begin working (other than literature review, etc.) until you've received approval.

- If you require lab equipment, supplies, reagents, etc., ordering these can take time (and costs money).

- If you are doing surveys, enrolling people in a study, coordinating anything with other people (especially internationally), etc., remember that it will almost always go more slowly than you might optimistically envision.

- Your readers need time to look over your thesis before they will approve it. Be sure to leave time to make revisions, as well.

- Many schools have a preferred format for theses. Try to find out if there's a template you can use. Formatting pages, notes, figures, tables, references, etc. can take time (though there is software available that can help you manage these things).

You might also look into books or websites on scholarly writing; there are many of these guides, and you might find something specific to your discipline.

Hope this helps! Good luck.

Now, back to my own writing, as I try to meet deadlines... ;)
 

julie29524

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If you want some examples of Systematic Literature reviews, message me with your email address. Its a good idea to do a review instead of a thesis, it does cuts down time, I know people that did it in 6 months.

What school are you at?

I am at UTHSC-SPH. I asked my advisor if Jan to Aug (6-7 month) is enough to write a thesis. She almost laughed. The process at my school is slow.


Hi .
I am trying to work on my thesis and want to finsh within 6 months.You think its a possiblity .I am so confused since it does not have struture .Can anyone who has worked on their thesis guide me regrading the whole process and how did you timleline it.
How does one write the Literature review.U have articels but .............
Waitng to hear from someone .
 
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