Mar 5, 2012
115
16
Toronto, Ontario
Status
Pre-Dental
Im in my third year of studies, this upcoming year i will be applying but still have not wrote the DAT. As a Canadian i want to give my self the best chance by applying early. So i finish exams late april lets say april 30th. I want to apply June 1st. When Should i write the DAT so i can get the scores in before then? Is it even just worth it, should i wait a couple weeks and apply maybe late June.
 
Jan 10, 2013
305
42
USA
Status
Dental Student
Im in my third year of studies, this upcoming year i will be applying but still have not wrote the DAT. As a Canadian i want to give my self the best chance by applying early. So i finish exams late april lets say april 30th. I want to apply June 1st. When Should i write the DAT so i can get the scores in before then? Is it even just worth it, should i wait a couple weeks and apply maybe late June.
If you are kinda iffy on the material or do not remember much of it, try planning for a good two months of studying (one month to review the material and the second month doing practice questions and exams)...some people can study and take the exam in less time but that's the amount of time I've heard many study (including myself). This exam is long and expensive and if you plan on taking it once, pace yourself and make sure you know the material well.

With that said, if you finish april 30th, start studying for the DAT right away. Maybe take a couple days to rest from finals and begin studying for the DAT then so you don't burn yourself out. Even if you take the exam in the beginning of July, you are still considered an early applicant. GL!!
 
OP
P
Mar 5, 2012
115
16
Toronto, Ontario
Status
Pre-Dental
All my classes are advanced level chem and bio courses so i think im good with the basics. So how long would you say someone with a strong background in the science need to study. Sorry I havent looked at the DAT stuff thats why my questions are vague.
 
Jan 10, 2013
305
42
USA
Status
Dental Student
No need to apologize. We're all stressing out to enter dental school :)

I'm taking the the US DAT..so I'm not too sure if the Canadian DAT is the same or similar? but anyways, I'm pasting an outline for what the US DAT is composed of. If you feel like you know the material, just peruse each topic and just go over what you think are your weak spots. I can't tell you how long the studying will take...maybe a month or so but everyone is different.

DAT:

Biology (40)
Cell and Molecular Biology - origin of life, cell metabolism (including photosynthesis/
enzymology, cellular processes, thermodynamics, organelle structure and function,
mitosis/meiosis, cell structure, and experimental cell biology
Diversity of Life: Biological Organization and Relationship of Major Taxa (Six-Kingdom,
Three-Domain System) – plantae, animalia, protista, fungi, eubacteria (bacteria), archae,
etc.
Structure and Function of Systems - integumentary, skeletal, muscular, circulatory,
immunological, digestive, respiratory, urinary, nervous/senses, endocrine, reproductive,
etc.
Developmental Biology - fertilization, descriptive embryology, developmental
mechanisms, and experimental embryology
Genetics - molecular genetics, human genetics, classical genetics, chromosomal
genetics, and genetic technology
Evolution, Ecology, and Behavior - natural selection, population genetics/speciation,
cladistics, population and community ecology, ecosystems, and animal behavior
(including social behavior).

General Chemistry (30)
Stoichiometry and General Concepts - percent composition, empirical formulae,
balancing equations, moles and molecular formulas, molar mass, density, and
calculations from balanced equations
Gases - kinetic molecular theory of gases, Dalton's, Boyle's, Charles's, and ideal gas law
Liquids and Solids - intermolecular forces, phase changes, vapor pressure, structures,
polarity, and properties
Solutions - polarity, properties (colligative, non-colligative), forces, and concentration
calculations
Acids and Bases - pH, strength, Brønsted-Lowry reactions, and calculations

Chemical Equilibria - molecular, acid/base, precipitation, calculations, and Le Chatelier's
principle
Thermodynamics and Thermochemistry - laws of thermodynamics, Hess's law,
spontaneity, enthalpies and entropies, and heat transfer
Chemical Kinetics - rate laws, activation energy, and half-life
Oxidation-Reduction Reactions - balancing equations, determination of oxidation
numbers, electrochemical calculations, and electrochemical concepts and terminology
Atomic and Molecular Structure - electron configuration, orbital types, Lewis-Dot
diagrams, atomic theory, quantum theory, molecular geometry, bond types, and subatomic particles
Periodic Properties - representative elements, transition elements, periodic trends, and
descriptive chemistry
Nuclear Reactions - balancing equations, binding energy, decay processes, particles,
and terminology
Laboratory - basic techniques, equipment, error analysis, safety, and data analysis

Organic Chemistry (30)
Mechanisms: Energetics, and Structure - elimination, addition, free radical, substitution
mechanisms, and other
Chemical and Physical Properties of Molecules - spectroscopy (1H NMR, 13C NMR, infrared, and multi-spectra), structure (polarity, intermolecular forces (solubility,
melting/boiling point, etc.), and laboratory theory and techniques (i.e. TLC, separations,
etc.)
Stereochemistry (structure evaluation) - chirality, isomer relationships, and conformations
Nomenclature - IUPAC rules and functional groups in molecules
Individual Reactions of the Major Functional Groups and Combinations of Reactions to
Synthesize Compounds - alkene/alkyne, aromatic, substitution/elimination, aldehyde/
ketone, carboxylic acids and derivatives, and other For each area listed above, the
following sub-areas apply: general, one-step, and multi-step.
Acid-Base Chemistry - ranking acidity/basicity (structure analysis and pH/pKa data
analysis), and prediction of products and equilibria
Aromatics and Bonding - concept of aromaticity, resonance, atomic/molecular orbitals,
hybridization, and bond angles/lengths.

The Perceptual Ability Test is comprised of six subtests: 1.) apertures, 2.) view
recognition, 3.) angle discrimination, 4.) paper folding, 5.) cube counting, and 6.) 3D form
development.

Reading Comprehension (50)
The Reading Comprehension Test contains three reading passages on various scientific
topics. Prior understanding of the science topics is not a prerequisite to answering the
test items. The reading passages require the ability to read, comprehend, and analyze
thoroughly basic scientific information.

Quantitative Reasoning (40)
A basic four function calculator is available on the computer screen in this section only;
see image below. The calculator is operated using the mouse, not the numerical keypad.
Mathematical Problems - Algebra (equations and expressions, inequalities, exponential
notation, absolute value, ratios and proportions, and graphical analysis); Numeric
calculations (fractions and decimals, percentages, approximations, and scientific
notation); Conversions (temperature, time, weight, and distance); Probability and
Statistics; Geometry; and Trigonometry
 

rullom

5+ Year Member
Aug 10, 2012
27
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Im a Canadian too and the problem is you are unlikely to get any interviews without a DAT score...what happens is since you are writing the Canadian DAT which I am assuming since you are canadian, you will write in Nov and they get the scores around january...this means they have filled most of the spots. There is a slim chance you get an interview and then the rest is contingent on your scores but it is unlikely because your file will always say "incomplete" and "awaiting DAT score". This happened to me. If you write the US DAT same thing applies so it takes them at least 1 month to get the scores from when you write....their turn over time is a bit faster since it is computer based....I think you get the score when you finish the test if I am not mistaken....So I say if you do CAN DAT don't bother applying in June...you have all the time in the world to get it in.
 
OP
P
Mar 5, 2012
115
16
Toronto, Ontario
Status
Pre-Dental
exactly buddy thats why, i wish i knew this last year lol. But im planning to write the Canadian one depending how i do this semester. Yea see since im going into my fourth year, i would have to wait an extra year if i write my canadian DAT in my fourth year. So first things first im going to write the aDAT as soon as i can