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TIPs for Compounding using Intercom Plus (WALGREENS)

Discussion in 'Pharmacy' started by kum718, Sep 7, 2017.

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  1. kum718

    kum718

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    Sep 7, 2017
    Hi, I am a new floater and i seriously need help using intercom plus to type compounding drugs. any tips would be appreciated. thanks in advance
     
    Lalale likes this.
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  3. Apotheker2015

    Apotheker2015 2+ Year Member

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    Jun 9, 2015
    I am not with Walgreens. I did rotations there through my 4th year, though. I'd say your best bet is to seek a knowledgeable technician and go from there. They should be entering it for you anyhow. It's good for you to know how but at the end of the day, it comes down to knowing which NDCs are covered by Medicaid, etc. I think your time is best spent accomplishing pharmacist tasks.
     
  4. Lexington2012

    Lexington2012 5+ Year Member

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    Sep 7, 2012
    Lexington, KY
    Your techs need to be the ones pressing F1, not you. Reviewing an RX you typed also sets you up for increased liability.
     
  5. owlegrad

    owlegrad Uncontrollable Sarcasm Machine Staff Member SDN Administrator 7+ Year Member

    Seeing as how the pharmacist already has total liability for everything they review I'm curious what that level would be. Plus ultra?
     
  6. Abby Atwood

    Abby Atwood

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    Jan 4, 2017
    I know that Walmart has some policies about pharmacists reviewing their own typed scripts. Depending on the situation, a pharmacist reviewing their own script might have decrease liability insurance protections since you would be practicing outside company policy.
     
    Lexington2012 likes this.
  7. owlegrad

    owlegrad Uncontrollable Sarcasm Machine Staff Member SDN Administrator 7+ Year Member

    Interesting. So a pharmacist at Walmart would never help at order entry presumably?

    I still don't buy the extra liability part though, the pharmacist is already totally liable for every script they check. I am no pretend lawyer but I don't buy that I would have more liability for a script I type vs one someone else typed.
     
    BidingMyTime and Abby Atwood like this.
  8. wagrxm2000

    wagrxm2000 2+ Year Member

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    Sep 17, 2014
    What do you need help with?
     
  9. kum718

    kum718

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    Sep 7, 2017
    Just inputing the script. Sometimes intercom doesn't give the formula for the compounding product. in that case what do you do?

    I another question unrelated to compounding. When you see "wag rxsa" rejection. How do you override that. I have encountered such rejections twice, and can't seem to find my way around it. Thanks for your help
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2017
  10. pezdispenser

    pezdispenser 10+ Year Member

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    'RxSA' TPRs are actually internal Walgreens safety alerts. Do not contact the insurance about these. e.g. verify Look Alike Sound Alike drugs like hydroxyzine/hydralazine and override with Prior Authorization Type 1 code 6666.
     
  11. txpharmguy

    txpharmguy 7+ Year Member

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    Dec 20, 2007
    There's a list of compound recipes on StoreNet (hundreds). The most common is a magic mouthwash with benadryl/maalox/viscous lidocaine 1:1:1. Check the lidocaine box, dosage form "suspension" and search for recipe. Select appropriate one. Click on green box for ingredient cost. It'll prompt you for each manufacturer of specific drug. Enter total Qty. Prepopulated recipes always fill in the beyond use date
     
  12. Sine Cura

    Sine Cura 10 seconds or less 7+ Year Member

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    The argument is that verifying your own input is subject to cognitive bias, i.e., why would you type anything wrong? So the idea is you are deliberately engaging in risky behavior
     
    PharmD500 and owlegrad like this.
  13. owlegrad

    owlegrad Uncontrollable Sarcasm Machine Staff Member SDN Administrator 7+ Year Member

    Oh no I get to Theory I just find it odd since most pharmacist I know will occasionally enter their own Scripts. And heck don't most hospitals have pharmacist do data entry? So for it to be literally against company policy at a major realtor pretty much shocks me. I mean heck at CVS I didn't even always have an order entry Tech!
     
  14. Sine Cura

    Sine Cura 10 seconds or less 7+ Year Member

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    Feb 5, 2010
    CVS definitely doesn't care but it is a problem at Walmart. It is not official policy like you will be written up for doing 10% or more input but literally "a pharmacist should not input unless there is a special need to maintain workflow," a vague-ass statement.

    On the other hand Walmart kinda just pays lip service to order performance but CVS "cares" a lot more (WeCARE). WM does have metrics for RPH doing supportive personnel tasks and it can be considered inefficient for RPH doing input filling etc (LOL).

    If you put a WeCARE score to Walmart pharmacies I bet 80% of them would be below 20.
     
    owlegrad likes this.
  15. Apotheker2015

    Apotheker2015 2+ Year Member

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    Jun 9, 2015
    It's kind of hard to grasp it unless you've worked there. I know I didn't. Basically, the opening pharmacist arrives at 8am - one hour before the pharmacy opens at 9am. For the most part, during that hour all you're doing is input verification (4point) and visual verification. At CVS, as you know, those two are one queue. At Walmart, they are two separate queues. I have only had to do input at stores that are either very busy but have good workflow and good techs OR at other stores that just have careless techs and terrible and inefficient workflow. I will only do some Input if there is another pharmacist there. I let that pharmacist know that I will be doing Input and will turn off my 4Point light, so that he/she gets them.

    The whole overlap thing sounds like a great thing and it is, if your partner is good. Otherwise, you might be doing visual verification on prescriptions whose Input was verified by a sloppy pharmacist and you might be verifying "wrong product". Ultimately, that would be a 4 point error but at the end of the day, none of us wants to dispense the wrong product.
     
    owlegrad likes this.

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