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TPR Hyperlearning Science Workbook Mistake?

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Chrisebril1

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Physics Freestanding Question #3.

States linear density is 1^-5 mg/cm.
Then asks to "express this density in kg/m".

In the solution, they state 1^-5 mg/cm is equal to 10^5 mg/cm, and that the "answer" is, 10^1 kg/m.

1^-5 is equal to 1 is it not?

Answer should be 10^5 kg/m right?
 

Chrisebril1

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Their answer is correct. Also, the question states 10^5, not 10^-5.

Maybe I have an outdated version of the book.

In the solutions they convert 10^5mg/cm to kg/m which is 10kg/m

But in the question they never mention the "10^5mg/cm" they say "express 1^-5 mg/cm in kg/m".

Is the 1^-5 a typo? Should it say 10^5mg/cm.

The solution makes sense, but in the question, they mention 1^-5 mg/cm, but in the solution they mention 10^5mg/cm....
 

tartrate

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Maybe I have an outdated version of the book.

In the solutions they convert 10^5mg/cm to kg/m which is 10kg/m

But in the question they never mention the "10^5mg/cm" they say "express 1^-5 mg/cm in kg/m".

Is the 1^-5 a typo? Should it say 10^5mg/cm.

The solution makes sense, but in the question, they mention 1^-5 mg/cm, but in the solution they mention 10^5mg/cm....

I believe it is a typo. I find typos not uncommon in these type of books (if only I had a dime for every time they...), and I just go with what is most reasonable to me. After all, on the real test it's only you and your brain that matters, and nothing else :).

1^-5 is a funny way of expressing a number.
 
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