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Tufts MBS Program (2020-2021)

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Adrenaline_Junkie

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Hello SMP applicants,

I currently give tours for the Tufts MBS Program program here in Boston's Chinatown. I wanted to get this thread started in case any prospective students who can't visit the campus had any questions about the program, living in Boston or anything else related to how the MBS program supports you throughout the application process.

Good luck to everyone applying!
 
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SAMBAA

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Hi! Thanks for making this thread.

How many students are typically in the program?
What are the (estimated) statistics of matriculation to Tufts Medical School after finishing the program?
 
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Adrenaline_Junkie

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Hi! Thanks for making this thread.

How many students are typically in the program?
What are the (estimated) statistics of matriculation to Tufts Medical School after finishing the program?

Great questions!

Total enrollment is usually 120 with about 12-8 being pre-dental and the rest being pre-med.

The dental school acceptance is near 100% and they normally apply during the first year of the program.

The pre-med interview percentages for MBS students are near 50% of MBS students who apply after their first year coursework is completed. Keep in mind you will also be applying with other MBS students who may have taken a gap year after their first year.

About 25-30 MBS students matriculate every year into the MD program. I am sure more are accepted, but they may be going to cheaper state schools in their respective home-states.

I have never heard of anyone getting an interview to the Tufts MD program if they apply during the first year coursework for MBS. They want to see a full years worth of grades beforehand.
 

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What % of students that apply will matriculate to medical school in general? Not to Tufts specifically?
 

Adrenaline_Junkie

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What % of students that apply will matriculate to medical school in general? Not to Tufts specifically?

Some MBS students are pre-dental, so using a straight percentage of the whole class won't be a true reflection of the matriculation rate to medical school alone. Additionally, a lot of students are coming straight from college to MBS (~40-50% of the class) and will take another gap year after the program ends before applying. Of the students I personally know that are applying, most of them have gotten into at least one MD program in the U.S., and those that haven't, have gotten into at least one DO program. If you meet the median MCAT for Tufts (514), do well in MBS (>3.8 GPA) and have a well-rounded application then you will likely get an interview at Tufts.

That being said, the overall matriculation rate (which was previously advertised as 98%) also includes MD, DO and International medical schools. This is something that I would keep in mind at all programs that focus on advertising their overall matriculation rate to medical school. Make sure to ask what kind of medical schools students are attending if that is important to you. I know that there is a list of schools that have historically accepted Tufts MBS alumni. You can probably ask Laura Nunn for a copy by calling the MBS Office.
 
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drsssss

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Hi and thank you for making this thread, I was wondering if it was common to complete the the MBS in one year only instead of two and apply to medical schools the June right before MBS starts in august?
 
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Adrenaline_Junkie

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Hi and thank you for making this thread, I was wondering if it was common to complete the the MBS in one year only instead of two and apply to medical schools the June right before MBS starts in august?

No problem, happy to do it.

It is very uncommon to finish the program in one year (unless you are a dental student). Dental students are commonly accepted to Tufts Dental during the first year of the MBS program and >90% are accepted from what I understand. I would say 95% of the pre-med students will choose the two year option and for good reason. Most of us apply during the second year of the program to have special consideration at Tufts.

I personally came in with the intention of completing the program in one year and not paying the continuation fee for the second year. I was convinced before getting to Tufts that the continuation fee was just a scam designed to take money from students. After finishing my first year I realized how crazy the one year timeline would be. It was even more hectic for people who were not happy with their MCAT score and wanted to re-take it in May/June before applying. Also, the continuation fee allowed me to remain enrolled as a full-time student and gave me access to financial aid and on-campus housing that I wouldn't have had otherwise. That being said, I know 2 of my 110 classmates applying to med school that applied to med school during the program and did the 1 year timeline. It was rushed and crazy, but they did it because they were starting med school in August.

When I arrived in Boston, it became very clear to me that I should focus on my classes during the first year of MBS to do well in the program (especially because my main weakness as a re-applicant was my GPA). I had already taken my MCAT before starting MBS and so I decided to apply during my second year while completing my thesis. Some of my friends are even taking the second year to do their thesis and re-take the MCAT, with the intention of applying the following cycle.

Remember, if you apply during the first year, you would need to finish all secondaries before classes begin and then prepare for interviews/travel while enrolled in classes. Not to mention that you would not have any of your MBS grades submitted until early January and most schools already have their first round of acceptances sent out before they have even looked at your 1st semester grades. Additionally, you will NOT get special consideration at Tufts if you apply during the first year of MBS.

This makes total sense because they want to see your full year performance before considering how you will stack up against their own medical students if granted admission. I know several people who have applied during the first year in the past who wished they would have waited to apply until after the first year of the program. You will receive special consideration at Tufts for all application cycles after your first year.

Hope this helps!
 

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Hello! thank you for all your wonderful advice on the program. I had a separate question about the application process. My 4/4 mcat date was cancelled, and the next possible option is 6/19 which I signed up for. I am in one of the covid hotspots in Chicago, so who knows if that date will still stand. I was recently perusing GT's SMP site and they are taking practice FL scores as a replacement in order to get everything in on time. Do you think it is appropriate if I mention this new georgetown policy in my email to tufts admissions and asking if that is possible? AAMC has said they will consider expedited score release, but I am not sure it will come back before the tufts deadline of July 1st. I realize that I have already put myself at a considerable disadvantage applying near the end of the cycle in rolling admissions, but I will regret not being able to apply at all vs applying at the last possible moment with a practice FL score.

TLDR do you think it's appropriate to mention another program's name when asking if I am able to submit practice FL scores due to mass cancellations of actual test dates? Also, do you recommend emailing the general tufts mbs admissions email or the specific email of an admissions counselor (emails from general email are addressed from her)?

thank you so much in advance!!!!
 

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Waitlisted today. Do y’all know anything about waitlist movement from previous cohorts?


Sent from my iPhone using SDN
 
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grk268

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Waitlisted today. Do y’all know anything about waitlist movement from previous cohorts?


Sent from my iPhone using SDN
do you mind sharing your stats?
best of luck going forward with the waitlist!
 

Adrenaline_Junkie

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Hello! thank you for all your wonderful advice on the program. I had a separate question about the application process. My 4/4 mcat date was cancelled, and the next possible option is 6/19 which I signed up for. I am in one of the covid hotspots in Chicago, so who knows if that date will still stand. I was recently perusing GT's SMP site and they are taking practice FL scores as a replacement in order to get everything in on time. Do you think it is appropriate if I mention this new georgetown policy in my email to tufts admissions and asking if that is possible? AAMC has said they will consider expedited score release, but I am not sure it will come back before the tufts deadline of July 1st. I realize that I have already put myself at a considerable disadvantage applying near the end of the cycle in rolling admissions, but I will regret not being able to apply at all vs applying at the last possible moment with a practice FL score.

TLDR do you think it's appropriate to mention another program's name when asking if I am able to submit practice FL scores due to mass cancellations of actual test dates? Also, do you recommend emailing the general tufts mbs admissions email or the specific email of an admissions counselor (emails from general email are addressed from her)?

thank you so much in advance!!!!

Interesting times!

I think it would be best to schedule an appointment with the MBS office here: Tufts University Health Sciences - MBS Program - Campus Visit

During the virtual "visit" you will have plenty of opportunities to not only learn more about the program but also ask questions about admissions. I think this would be better than simply calling in and asking then hanging up. Furthermore, I would refrain from using any program names. Stick with a general statement: "I heard some programs are doing X, is this something the MBS admissions team is considering as well?"

I think it still gets the point across. Good luck!
 
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Adrenaline_Junkie

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Waitlisted today. Do y’all know anything about waitlist movement from previous cohorts?


Sent from my iPhone using SDN

Not too sure about WL movement, but I would imagine that the admissions team may be able to answer questions in terms of how it has been in years past? I would consider writing a letter to the admissions team respectfully asking them for this information if they can provide it.

Good luck!
 

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Hi @DJ_MD - I am highly considering this program and was hoping to tour the SMPs I got into, but of course can't do that now... I'm basically stuck deciding between two programs right now and it's coming down to location and advising/med school application support. Thanks in advance for answering my questions!

Is it safe at night, can I study late at the library, or should I plan on studying at home? (Ik rent prices are not the best but I plan to be living near campus so I don't have to rely on public transit)
What's the advising like? Are the advisors the type that will give individual attention to help fix your PS and application, look at your resume and suggest ways to fill gaps, make school lists, interview stuff, etc. Or is it more a bunch of lectures throughout the semester?
 
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Adrenaline_Junkie

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Hi @DJ_MD - I am highly considering this program and was hoping to tour the SMPs I got into, but of course can't do that now... I'm basically stuck deciding between two programs right now and it's coming down to location and advising/med school application support. Thanks in advance for answering my questions!

Is it safe at night, can I study late at the library, or should I plan on studying at home? (Ik rent prices are not the best but I plan to be living near campus so I don't have to rely on public transit)
What's the advising like? Are the advisors the type that will give individual attention to help fix your PS and application, look at your resume and suggest ways to fill gaps, make school lists, interview stuff, etc. Or is it more a bunch of lectures throughout the semester?

To be honest, the Tufts campus is pretty concentrated on Harrison Ave. so there isn't much to tour. It's right in the heart of Chinatown which is great in terms of proximity to food/coffee shops. I give tours in-person on M/W and typically end up taking applicants to the 4th floor of the library and let them ask me whatever they want about the program. The last 15 minutes of the tour are spent going around the main places I studied on campus, the gym and also Posner lecture hall.

Here are some answers to your specific Qs...

Campus has generally been very safe at night since I moved here in 2018. To be fully transparent, there was a stabbing several months ago that occurred at around 3am, but it did not involve anyone from the Tufts community. In general, cities do have crime and these things happen, but Tufts PD does a great job of keeping the area safe for students.

That being said, the library usually closes at 11pm. Students can sometimes get away with staying 1-2 hours past close, but if campus police comes around and tells you to go home then you will need to leave. The T operates until around 2am so there is plenty of time to make it out and onto the T if you need to. There are also web apps that give the times of when trains leave if you want to time it so you aren't waiting around when you get to the station. I have repeatedly used the T after 11pm since I work late in the north end of Boston and have never had any issues. I do my best to stay on the phone with someone if I am walking home very late and that has worked well for me.

My advising experience was incredible at Tufts. Not only did faculty and advisors support me, but I also had access to support from medical students who had just been through the admissions process. Some of my best mock interviews were with M3's that I came to meet when I first arrived in Boston for MBS. I felt like they really helped calm my nerves before interview day and asked questions that provided a very accurate representation of my interview day experience at Tufts.

You are assigned an advisor during orientation and each group is typically made up of 6-8 students. Your first meeting will be after orientation for lunch. We don't have lectures, but some advisors did end up taking their students out to lunch midway through each semester just to check in and see how things are going. Most of my meetings with my advisor were 1-on-1 and I never had any issues getting ahold of him. My advisor was always willing to look at PS/Resume/Cover Letters for jobs, etc... but I know that not everyone's advisor was as hands on as mine was.

In addition to your assigned advisor, you are free to seek help from other advisors as well. Some of these advisors will be more helpful than others. If you choose to do your MBS with Tufts, I promise you, you will not be disappointed with the level of access you have to faculty with insights on how admissions works. When you start, there will be plenty of 2nd year MBSers and M1's who can point you in the right direction of who to ask for help regarding PS, interviews, etc.
 
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DM270

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Accepted! Extremely excited to get started at Tufts :)
 
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TealUmbrella

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To be honest, the Tufts campus is pretty concentrated on Harrison Ave. so there isn't much to tour. It's right in the heart of Chinatown which is great in terms of proximity to food/coffee shops. I give tours in-person on M/W and typically end up taking applicants to the 4th floor of the library and let them ask me whatever they want about the program. The last 15 minutes of the tour are spent going around the main places I studied on campus, the gym and also Posner lecture hall.

Here are some answers to your specific Qs...

Campus has generally been very safe at night since I moved here in 2018. To be fully transparent, there was a stabbing several months ago that occurred at around 3am, but it did not involve anyone from the Tufts community. In general, cities do have crime and these things happen, but Tufts PD does a great job of keeping the area safe for students.

That being said, the library usually closes at 11pm. Students can sometimes get away with staying 1-2 hours past close, but if campus police comes around and tells you to go home then you will need to leave. The T operates until around 2am so there is plenty of time to make it out and onto the T if you need to. There are also web apps that give the times of when trains leave if you want to time it so you aren't waiting around when you get to the station. I have repeatedly used the T after 11pm since I work late in the north end of Boston and have never had any issues. I do my best to stay on the phone with someone if I am walking home very late and that has worked well for me.

My advising experience was incredible at Tufts. Not only did faculty and advisors support me, but I also had access to support from medical students who had just been through the admissions process. Some of my best mock interviews were with M3's that I came to meet when I first arrived in Boston for MBS. I felt like they really helped calm my nerves before interview day and asked questions that provided a very accurate representation of my interview day experience.

You are assigned an advisor during orientation and will meet with them in a group along with whoever else is in your advisor group. We don't really have lectures, but some advisors did end up taking their students out to lunch each semester just to check in and see how things are going. Most of my meetings with my advisor were 1 on 1 and I never had any issues getting ahold of him. My advisor was always willing to look at PS/Resume/Cover Letters for jobs, etc... but I know that not everyone's advisor was as hands on as mine was.

In addition to your assigned advisor, you are free to seek help from other advisors as well. Some of these advisors will be more helpful than others. If you choose to do your MBS with Tufts, I promise you, you will not be disappointed with the level of access you have to faculty with insights on how admissions works. When you start, there will be plenty of 2nd year MBSers and M1's who can point you in the right direction of who to ask for help regarding PS, interviews, etc.
Thank you for your in-depth answers! Haha I'm glad that the area has been generally safe and good for you. Sounds like there's a lot of people to turn to for advice in every step, which is great.
 
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Adrenaline_Junkie

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Thank you for your in-depth answers! Haha I'm glad that the area has been generally safe and good for you. Sounds like there's a lot of people to turn to for advice in every step, which is great.

Happy to share! I feel like the SMP process can be scary, especially because of the costs and lack of admission/interview guarantees. What made it easier for me was having access to 10+ people who did their SMP at each of the major programs. The more info I got, the more I felt like I was taking a calculated risk rather than a blind one.

I know not everyone has this kind of network so I figure giving tours and posting about it here are the best way to pay it forward. I also had a great experience with Tufts so I am obviously biased. If you know anyone who is currently in an SMP or has done one through your own network (or friend's networks), I highly encourage you to reach out to them to get "insider info".
 
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DM270

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To be honest, the Tufts campus is pretty concentrated on Harrison Ave. so there isn't much to tour. It's right in the heart of Chinatown which is great in terms of proximity to food/coffee shops. I give tours in-person on M/W and typically end up taking applicants to the 4th floor of the library and let them ask me whatever they want about the program. The last 15 minutes of the tour are spent going around the main places I studied on campus, the gym and also Posner lecture hall.

Here are some answers to your specific Qs...

Campus has generally been very safe at night since I moved here in 2018. To be fully transparent, there was a stabbing several months ago that occurred at around 3am, but it did not involve anyone from the Tufts community. In general, cities do have crime and these things happen, but Tufts PD does a great job of keeping the area safe for students.

That being said, the library usually closes at 11pm. Students can sometimes get away with staying 1-2 hours past close, but if campus police comes around and tells you to go home then you will need to leave. The T operates until around 2am so there is plenty of time to make it out and onto the T if you need to. There are also web apps that give the times of when trains leave if you want to time it so you aren't waiting around when you get to the station. I have repeatedly used the T after 11pm since I work late in the north end of Boston and have never had any issues. I do my best to stay on the phone with someone if I am walking home very late and that has worked well for me.

My advising experience was incredible at Tufts. Not only did faculty and advisors support me, but I also had access to support from medical students who had just been through the admissions process. Some of my best mock interviews were with M3's that I came to meet when I first arrived in Boston for MBS. I felt like they really helped calm my nerves before interview day and asked questions that provided a very accurate representation of my interview day experience at Tufts.

You are assigned an advisor during orientation and each group is typically made up of 6-8 students. Your first meeting will be after orientation for lunch. We don't have lectures, but some advisors did end up taking their students out to lunch midway through each semester just to check in and see how things are going. Most of my meetings with my advisor were 1-on-1 and I never had any issues getting ahold of him. My advisor was always willing to look at PS/Resume/Cover Letters for jobs, etc... but I know that not everyone's advisor was as hands on as mine was.

In addition to your assigned advisor, you are free to seek help from other advisors as well. Some of these advisors will be more helpful than others. If you choose to do your MBS with Tufts, I promise you, you will not be disappointed with the level of access you have to faculty with insights on how admissions works. When you start, there will be plenty of 2nd year MBSers and M1's who can point you in the right direction of who to ask for help regarding PS, interviews, etc.


Since you said you typically do tours etc, 1 piece of info I haven't been able to find is where students tend to live. I'm semi-familiar with Boston and know the T gives pretty solid access all over but I was curious if most of the MBS students tend to live closer to campus (South End, Beacon Hill, China town) or if more tend to commute in from Medford, Cambridge, East Boston, South Boston, etc. Thanks!
 
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Adrenaline_Junkie

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Since you said you typically do tours etc, 1 piece of info I haven't been able to find is where students tend to live. I'm semi-familiar with Boston and know the T gives pretty solid access all over but I was curious if most of the MBS students tend to live closer to campus (South End, Beacon Hill, China town) or if more tend to commute in from Medford, Cambridge, East Boston, South Boston, etc. Thanks!

It really depends on your budget. I personally lived in Chinatown right behind campus on Tyler st. because I found a place that fit my budget. I wasn't very familiar with the area and really appreciated the proximity to campus for exam days, going to lecture and studying in the library. Had I gotten in earlier, I would have applied to live in Posner (which unfortunately isn't an option this year due to the COVID situation).

That being said, people live all over the place, including all of the places you listed. I would say a lot of students looking for affordable housing end up in Jamaica Plain because rent is much more affordable than in the city. If you live in JP its fairly easy to hop on the orange line at Forest Hills to get to Tufts Medical Center (~40min commute usually). A lot of students used this long commute time as an opportunity to study or review ANKI cards before class.

If you have the means, living close by in AVA, One Greenway or in the apartments along Tyler street will be very convenient. Some people prefer living further from campus to get away from school after studying. These people usually live in Beacon Hill/Cambridge/Somerville. If you don't care for lecture, then you can definitely get away with living farther away. Most people don't go to lecture by the second semester anyway and only a small subset of lectures are mandatory (ie Histology is entirely flipped classroom). There are also some small groups for specific classes which are mandatory. Otherwise, close to 80% of the program can be done remotely by streaming lectures.
 
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iobu

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Hello everyone, I have done the MBS program. I would like to warn you of a few things and give you my point of view:

We are entering into a recession as of now. Healthcare spendings will be targeted. US will shift from quality to quantity of healthcare service. This means that they will drive nurses and PA's into the market. And while this is happening medical school tuition is sky-rocketing. And here you are trying to get into a program that is going to cost you another 100k on top of the medical school tuition.

Going into Tufts MBS is a $100k mistake. You will pay every penny with interest. By the time you become practicing physician, this 100k loan will become 200k+ with interest. You not only lose another 2 years by enrolling into this program, but also lose 1-2 year's income as an employee in any sector.

Lets make a quick calculation:
(55k tuition + loan fees + living expenses) + second year expenses + yearly 7% interest = loan will double in 9 years when you start practicing = 200k
Good luck paying it all back with the med school loan (another 250k + interest). You will most likely graduate medical school with $500k loan, which will accrue $35k interest per year (7%). Dont forget the income tax. if you are looking at salaries online, those are pre-tax income for physicians in their mid-career (15 years of experience).

This program will barely improve your application. And they lie to you about how they will get you into their Tufts medical school if you get above 3.7 gpa. Not always the case and this is a business; they will do their best to market their program to make money off you. They will accept 15-20 people of the 120 people so that these students can do their marketing online in these forums and give you a more optimistic image than the reality. There are many classmates of mine who had decent GPA from Tufts MBS, decent MCAT with stellar volunteer + research + work experience but didnt get accepted to ANYWHERE including Tufts MD. They wanted to wait another year or two and then reapply while their loans are accruing interest.

I suggest that you invest your money into getting a high MCAT score (the only objective way to assess applicants). This should be primary focus as it is by far more important than your grad gpa.
Take post-bac courses (biochem, physio, path, pharm) at a cheap institution to boost your undergrad GPA until your gpa is closer to average accepted applicant's.
Do part-time Research.
Re-apply to MD and DO.
If you ever do SMP, do masters/postbac program that guarantees admission to their MD program.


Lastly, take everything you hear with a grain of salt.
 
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DM270

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Did you actually do the program at Tufts?

Hello everyone, we are entering into a recession as of now. Healthcare spendings will be targeted. US will shift from quality to quantity of healthcare service. This means that they will drive nurses and PA's into the market. And while this is happening medical school tuition is sky-rocketing. And here you are trying to get into a program that is going to cost you another 100k on top of the medical school tuition. I have few things to say for those of you who wish to get into medical school.

Going into Tufts MBS is a $100k mistake. You will pay every penny with interest. By the time you become practicing physician, this 100k loan will become 200k+ with interest. You not only lose another 2 years by enrolling into this program, but also lose 1-2 year's income as an employee in any sector.

Lets make a quick calculation:
(55k tuition + loan fees + living expenses) + second year expenses + yearly 7% interest = loan will double in 9 years when you start practicing = 200k
Good luck paying it all back with the med school loan (another 250k + interest). You will most likely graduate medical school with $500k loan, which will accrue $35k interest per year (7%). Dont forget the income tax. if you are looking at salaries online, those are pre-tax income for physicians in their mid-career (15 years of experience).

This program will barely improve your application. And they lie to you about how they will get you into their Tufts medical school if you get above 3.7 gpa. Not always the case and this is a business; they will do their best to market their program to make money off you. They will accept 15-20 people of the 120 people so that these students can do their marketing online in these forums and give you a more optimistic image than the reality. There are many classmates of mine who had decent GPA from Tufts MBS, decent MCAT with stellar volunteer + research + work experience but didnt get accepted to ANYWHERE including Tufts MD. They wanted to wait another year or two and then reapply while their loans are accruing interest.

I suggest that you invest your money into getting a high MCAT score (the only objective way to assess applicants). This should be primary focus as it is by far more important than your grad gpa.
Take post-bac courses (biochem, physio, path, pharm) at a cheap institution to boost your undergrad GPA until your gpa is closer to average accepted applicant's.
Do part-time Research.
Re-apply to MD and DO.
If you ever do SMP, do masters/postbac program that guarantees admission to their MD program.


Lastly, take everything you hear with a grain of salt.
 

Adrenaline_Junkie

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Hello everyone, we are entering into a recession as of now. Healthcare spendings will be targeted. US will shift from quality to quantity of healthcare service. This means that they will drive nurses and PA's into the market. And while this is happening medical school tuition is sky-rocketing. And here you are trying to get into a program that is going to cost you another 100k on top of the medical school tuition. I have few things to say for those of you who wish to get into medical school.

Going into Tufts MBS is a $100k mistake. You will pay every penny with interest. By the time you become practicing physician, this 100k loan will become 200k+ with interest. You not only lose another 2 years by enrolling into this program, but also lose 1-2 year's income as an employee in any sector.

Lets make a quick calculation:
(55k tuition + loan fees + living expenses) + second year expenses + yearly 7% interest = loan will double in 9 years when you start practicing = 200k
Good luck paying it all back with the med school loan (another 250k + interest). You will most likely graduate medical school with $500k loan, which will accrue $35k interest per year (7%). Dont forget the income tax. if you are looking at salaries online, those are pre-tax income for physicians in their mid-career (15 years of experience).

This program will barely improve your application. And they lie to you about how they will get you into their Tufts medical school if you get above 3.7 gpa. Not always the case and this is a business; they will do their best to market their program to make money off you. They will accept 15-20 people of the 120 people so that these students can do their marketing online in these forums and give you a more optimistic image than the reality. There are many classmates of mine who had decent GPA from Tufts MBS, decent MCAT with stellar volunteer + research + work experience but didnt get accepted to ANYWHERE including Tufts MD. They wanted to wait another year or two and then reapply while their loans are accruing interest.

I suggest that you invest your money into getting a high MCAT score (the only objective way to assess applicants). This should be primary focus as it is by far more important than your grad gpa.
Take post-bac courses (biochem, physio, path, pharm) at a cheap institution to boost your undergrad GPA until your gpa is closer to average accepted applicant's.
Do part-time Research.
Re-apply to MD and DO.
If you ever do SMP, do masters/postbac program that guarantees admission to their MD program.


Lastly, take everything you hear with a grain of salt.

I am deeply sorry for how betrayed you feel by the MBS program. I personally did not have this experience. Rather, I found that the Tufts MBS program was the primary reason I was able to get into medical school this cycle. In fact, the only thing that changed between my application cycles was this program. Again, this was MY experience and I am not saying everyone will have the exact experience I did. Before doing MBS I had a 90%ile MCAT and had taken plenty of post-bacc course work at a local community college. At a certain point, your uGPA can only be "boosted" so much and a masters GPA that is treated separately becomes more important to distinguish yourself.

Tufts in no way benefits from you taking out loans or accruing interest vs. paying the fees outright. Most people who pursue an education in the U.S. have to take out loans and, while our education system is overpriced, this is a decision people are free to make for themselves. I do think that if you plan to pay your entire cost of attendance with loans, you will need to realize the financial implications of this, so thank you for highlighting that. I viewed this as an investment in myself and it paid off. I do think that if it had not paid off, I would have been pretty upset, so in that sense I do empathize with you and your friends.

Now about Tufts lying to you about accepting all students who earn a 3.7 GPA... this is an outright fallacy. From the beginning, Tufts MBS faculty and administration make it clear that there is no official linkage with TUSM. That being said, a solid percentage of MBS students are interviewed and accepted. No one is making any promises. Every year there are plenty of qualified applicants who are rejected at EVERY medical school... not just Tufts. I do agree that your MCAT score is more important than your masters GPA. Faculty tell us this from day 1. In fact, I know plenty of people who got a 4.0 in MBS but were not admitted due to low MCAT scores.

I do think that it is important for every applicant to understand WHY they are pursuing the MBS degree. If you have a great uGPA and your MCAT is your weak link, I do not think this program is the right fit for you. I do think this program helps you perform better on the bio section of the MCAT, but there are plenty of cheaper and more time efficient ways to improve your MCAT score. This program is for people who want to strengthen their academic credentials, PERIOD. In my case, I had a good MCAT score, plenty of clinical experience but a lackluster uGPA. This program was exactly what I needed and for that I am grateful.
 
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iobu

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I am deeply sorry for how betrayed you feel by the MBS program. I personally did not have this experience. Rather, I found that the Tufts MBS program was the primary reason I was able to get into medical school this cycle. In fact, the only thing that changed between my application cycles was this program. Again, this was MY experience and I am not saying everyone will have the exact experience I did. Before doing MBS I had a 90%ile MCAT and had taken plenty of post-bacc course work at a local community college. At a certain point, your uGPA can only be "boosted" so much and a masters GPA that is treated separately becomes more important to distinguish yourself.

Tufts in no way benefits from you taking out loans or accruing interest. I do think that if you plan to pay your entire cost of attendance with loans, you will need to realize the financial implications of this, so thank you for highlighting that. I viewed this as an investment in myself and it paid off. I do think that if it had not paid off, I would have been pretty upset, so in that sense I do empathize with you and your friends.

Now about Tufts lying to you about accepting all students who earn a 3.7 GPA... this is an outright fallacy. From the beginning, Tufts MBS faculty and administration make it clear that there is no official linkage with TUSM. That being said, a solid percentage of MBS students are interviewed and accepted. No one is making any promises. Every year there are plenty of qualified applicants who are rejected at EVERY medical school... not just Tufts. I do agree that your MCAT score is more important than your masters GPA. Faculty tell us this from day 1. In fact, I know plenty of people who got a 4.0 in MBS but were not admitted due to low MCAT scores.

I do think that it is important for every applicant to understand WHY they are pursuing the MBS degree. If you have a great uGPA and your MCAT is your weak link, I do not think this program is the right fit for you. I do think this program helps your do better on the bio section of the MCAT, but there are plenty of cheaper and more time efficient ways to improve your MCAT score. This program is for people who want to strengthen their academic credentials, PERIOD. In my case, I had a good MCAT score, plenty of clinical experience but a lackluster uGPA. This program was exactly what I needed and for that I am grateful.
Glad to hear that it worked out for you. The fact that you were able to land into med school should not create a false positive image of the program. With your uber-competitive >90th percentile MCAT score (which is not the norm for Tufts MBS applicants), you are building a false perception of the program and make things sound easier than they really are.

I never said Tufts benefits from your accrued interests. They directly take the money as tuition from your loans. I think everyone got the point.

One of the faculty (Immunology) who was in the med school admissions committee said in the class that if we get above 3.7 master gpa, we should good. I know people who got above 3.7 AND were in the leadership positions (student government, sharewood volunteering coordinator, ambassadors) did still did not get in anywhere. Just because you got in, it does not erase other students' experiences.
 

Adrenaline_Junkie

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Glad to hear that it worked out for you. The fact that you were able to land into med school should not create a false positive image of the program. With your uber-competitive >90th percentile MCAT score (which is not the norm for Tufts MBS applicants), you are building a false perception of the program and make things sound easier than they really are.

I never said Tufts benefits from your accrued interests. They directly take the money as tuition from your loans. I think everyone got the point.

One of the faculty (Immunology) who was in the med school admissions committee said in the class that if we get above 3.7 master gpa, we should good. I know people who got above 3.7 AND were in the leadership positions (student government, sharewood volunteering coordinator, ambassadors) did still did not get in anywhere. Just because you got in, it does not erase other students' experiences.

"They wanted to wait another year or two and then reapply while their loans are accruing interest."
^ I assumed you meant Tufts wanted them to wait another year, which is why I made that statement about accrued interest. I apologize for misunderstanding your statement. It sounds like these people should have considered strengthening their applications in other ways before doing the MBS program. Again, timing is everything and I personally decided to do MBS after I exhausted all other options. I think other people should do the same if they want to pursue a program like this.

I am not sure why you think I am building a false perception of the program. I have been pretty transparent in all of my posts and have given people all the facts they need to make deductions about my experience with the program for themselves. I think the fact that you posted here is actually a great thing. It brings a different perspective to the table and allow us to engage in meaningful dialogue.

Just as you are entitled to an opinion, I am entitled to mine. This program helped me and many of my classmates. When compared to all the SMP programs, I think Tufts is one of the best. I have decided to spend my own time posting about it to share my positive experience with others. The school paid me to do tours when campus was open, but they don't pay me to post on SDN. I do this on my own accord because I had plenty of people to speak with in my own social circles who did the program and I decided to pay it forward to those who don't.

I think it's naive to assume this program will automatically get you into medical school. It's just one facet of your application. I know for a fact that you have taken that immunology professor's words and spun them to fit your own narrative. He told my class (and this years class) that you should aim for a 514 (Tuft's median MCAT) and above a 3.7gpa if you want to be considered for an interview at Tufts. It is in no way a guarantee of an interview or an acceptance, but rather just a trend from prior years. This is the same as going on MSAR and looking for median MCAT/GPA data. I know several people who were accepted this year (and in years past) with MCAT scores ~510. I also know several people who were rejected with higher stats. Again, these are just statistics and they don't tell the whole story behind an applicant.

I am in no way bashing on those students who did not get into medical school after MBS. Every applicant is different and has their own unique challenges. Some interview poorly, some have criminal/academic records you may not know about, some have low MCAT scores, etc. Some do everything right and STILL don't get in. This process is not a meritocracy, but that issue goes well beyond the MBS program at Tufts.
 
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iobu

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"They wanted to wait another year or two and then reapply while their loans are accruing interest."
^ I assumed you meant Tufts wanted them to wait another year, which is why I made that statement about accrued interest. I apologize for misunderstanding your statement. It sounds like these people should have considered strengthening their applications in other ways before doing the MBS program. Again, timing is everything and I personally decided to do MBS after I exhausted all other options. I think other people should do the same if they want to pursue a program like this.

I am not sure why you think I am building a false perception of the program. I have been pretty transparent in all of my posts and have given people all the facts they need to make deductions about my experience with the program for themselves. I think the fact that you posted here is actually a great thing. It brings a different perspective to the table and allow us to engage in meaningful dialogue.

Just as you are entitled to an opinion, I am entitled to mine. This program helped me and many of my classmates. When compared to all the SMP programs, I think Tufts is one of the best. I have decided to spend my own time posting about it to share my positive experience with others. The school paid me to do tours when campus was open, but they don't pay me to post on SDN. I do this on my own accord because I had plenty of people to speak with in my own social circles who did the program and I decided to pay it forward to those who don't.

I think it's naive to assume this program will automatically get you into medical school. It's just one facet of your application. I know for a fact that you have taken that immunology professor's words and spun them to fit your own narrative. He told my class (and this years class) that you should aim for a 514 (Tuft's median MCAT) and above a 3.7gpa if you want to be considered for an interview at Tufts. It is in no way a guarantee of an interview or an acceptance, but rather just a trend from prior years. This is the same as going on MSAR and looking for median MCAT/GPA data. I know several people who were accepted this year (and in years past) with MCAT scores ~510. I also know several people who were rejected with higher stats. Again, these are just statistics and they don't tell the whole story behind an applicant.

I am in no way bashing on those students who did not get into medical school after MBS. Every applicant is different and has their own unique challenges. Some interview poorly, some have criminal/academic records you may not know about, some have low MCAT scores, etc. Some do everything right and STILL don't get in. This process is not a meritocracy, but that issue goes well beyond the MBS program at Tufts.
Those students and I had academic advisors plus faculty members given by the Tufts MBS who encouraged us to apply and expressed that we are good candidates who would get in. We didn't make a judgement based on just the immunology professor. It's not as if we applied against their advice.

Let me answer why you are building a false image and why you are diligently putting in the effort to negate all the genuine advice I am giving to the people: You initially started this thread with saying that you work for MBS (giving tours etc.). It is apparent that you have conflict of interest. Otherwise, why would you, as a medical student applying for residency, diligently waste so much of your time here advertising a program who makes the bank already. You are getting paid by the program as you stated. You raise interest for the program in these forums and you get paid to give tour$. Otherwise, if you are really interested in helping people, there are many people who need help in this COVID crisis. Go volunteer. NHS is hiring. I am sure they would be interested in your "altruism."

You claim that people who did not get in must "Interview poorly" or "have academic/criminal record." I question the validity of your statement. I assume you would not have any information about how the rejected applicants interviewed or what kind of background they have. Thus I think you are using false assumptions to backup your point.

Unless Tufts MBS desperately needs to scam students into their program, I do not understand why you are wasting your precious time during medical school in order to praise the program and make it look better than it really is.
 
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I personally feel like you're doing a great job at explaining what the program is, what it has to offer, and do not feel that you're blowing it out of proportion. The financials is a very personal decision for each student, as you said, and it is an investment in your future. I personally will not be taking any loans to it is presumptuous for someone to tell all people that adding this to your educational repertoire is a waste. For my personal situation, I have years of credits for undergrad and taking a post-bacc would be essentially useless given the amount of credits I already have. An SMP was in fact recommended to me by an admissions officer at a different medical school because it will give me the opportunity to have a truly separate GPA that reflects my current abilities, not only one that compiles almost a decade of classes. While my overall GPA is lowish and my MCAT will definitely need work and to be retaken, my overall application is pretty fantastic (if I do say so myself). I have worked extremely hard to compile connections and experiences for years and that is reflected in my application, and will continue during my time at Tufts. Anyone believes spending this much money and checking the box of an SMP will "fix" their application is naive to what is expected from medical schools. I also agree with you that they work diligently to be sure it is understood there is no linkage program. If you have stats within their range AND an exceptional application that they feel will help add to their class dynamic, it is likely you will get an interview. The advantage of having a full year to cultivate those relationships is a benefit in and of itself but anyone that has been through the application process should know that quite literally nothing is promised.



"They wanted to wait another year or two and then reapply while their loans are accruing interest."
^ I assumed you meant Tufts wanted them to wait another year, which is why I made that statement about accrued interest. I apologize for misunderstanding your statement. It sounds like these people should have considered strengthening their applications in other ways before doing the MBS program. Again, timing is everything and I personally decided to do MBS after I exhausted all other options. I think other people should do the same if they want to pursue a program like this.

I am not sure why you think I am building a false perception of the program. I have been pretty transparent in all of my posts and have given people all the facts they need to make deductions about my experience with the program for themselves. I think the fact that you posted here is actually a great thing. It brings a different perspective to the table and allow us to engage in meaningful dialogue.

Just as you are entitled to an opinion, I am entitled to mine. This program helped me and many of my classmates. When compared to all the SMP programs, I think Tufts is one of the best. I have decided to spend my own time posting about it to share my positive experience with others. The school paid me to do tours when campus was open, but they don't pay me to post on SDN. I do this on my own accord because I had plenty of people to speak with in my own social circles who did the program and I decided to pay it forward to those who don't.

I think it's naive to assume this program will automatically get you into medical school. It's just one facet of your application. I know for a fact that you have taken that immunology professor's words and spun them to fit your own narrative. He told my class (and this years class) that you should aim for a 514 (Tuft's median MCAT) and above a 3.7gpa if you want to be considered for an interview at Tufts. It is in no way a guarantee of an interview or an acceptance, but rather just a trend from prior years. This is the same as going on MSAR and looking for median MCAT/GPA data. I know several people who were accepted this year (and in years past) with MCAT scores ~510. I also know several people who were rejected with higher stats. Again, these are just statistics and they don't tell the whole story behind an applicant.

I am in no way bashing on those students who did not get into medical school after MBS. Every applicant is different and has their own unique challenges. Some interview poorly, some have criminal/academic records you may not know about, some have low MCAT scores, etc. Some do everything right and STILL don't get in. This process is not a meritocracy, but that issue goes well beyond the MBS program at Tufts.
 
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Adrenaline_Junkie

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Those students and I had academic advisors plus faculty members given by the Tufts MBS who encouraged us to apply and expressed that we are good candidates who would get in. We didn't make a judgement based on just the immunology professor. It's not as if we applied against their advice.

Let me answer why you are building a false image and why you are diligently putting in the effort to negate all the genuine advice I am giving to the people: You initially started this thread with saying that you work for MBS (giving tours etc.). It is apparent that you have conflict of interest. Otherwise, why would you, as a medical student applying for residency, diligently waste so much of your time here advertising a program who makes the bank already. You are getting paid by the program as you stated. You raise interest for the program in these forums and you get paid to give tour$. Otherwise, if you are really interested in helping people, there are many people who need help in this COVID crisis. Go volunteer. NHS is hiring. I am sure they would be interested in your "altruism."

You claim that people who did not get in must "Interview poorly" or "have academic/criminal record." I question the validity of your statement. I assume you would not have any information about how the rejected applicants interviewed or what kind of background they have. Thus I think you are using false assumptions to backup your point.

Unless Tufts MBS desperately needs to scam students into their program, I do not understand why you are wasting your precious time during medical school in order to praise the program and make it look better than it really is.

1. Just because you and your friends didn't get in doesn't mean people shouldn't do the MBS program.

2. I do give tours for the campus, but I don't get paid if people decide to come to Tufts, so your "conflict of interest" point is invalid. Tours are free for prospective students and the MBS program pays me by the hour only if a tour is scheduled (it's usually 30-60min). If there was an incentive structure that paid me based on how many people I convinced to apply or attend the program, then I would totally understand what you mean.

3. I just matriculated this cycle and have plenty of time to spare before starting school. That being said, I can decide how to spend my own time and where to dedicate my altruism.

4. I did not say they MUST interview poorly or have academic/criminal records. Please re-read my sentence. I am just making the point that there are a variety of factors that play into admissions decisions and that some variables may be hidden/not shared with you. I am not assuming any of these happened, just pointing out that they can happen.

5. I could also ask you why you have spent your precious time posting on this forum ONLY to bash the MBS program. Unlike you, I am an active member of the SDN community and post about things other than how much MBS sucks. Regardless, we are all free to use our time how we like and I respect your decision to create an SDN account to share your negative MBS experience.

I get it. You feel like you got the short end of the stick and I'm sorry for that. Ultimately, it looks like you still got into medical school so I guess that's a plus. Could you have done it without MBS? Maybe. Maybe not.

I feel like I had a great experience, so I am deciding to share that with others. I agree to disagree with you and will continue to answer any questions people have about the program from my perspective.
 
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iobu

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1. Just because you and your friends didn't get in doesn't mean people shouldn't do the MBS program.

2. I do give tours for the campus, but I don't get paid if people decide to come to Tufts, so your "conflict of interest" point is invalid. If I was incentivized to recruit people then I would totally understand what you mean.

3. I just matriculated this cycle and have plenty of time to spare before starting school. That being said, I can decide how to spend my own time and where to dedicate my altruism.

4. I did not say they MUST interview poorly or have criminal records. Please re-read my sentence. I am just making the point that there are a variety of factors that play into admissions decisions and that some variables are hidden/not shared with others. I am not assuming any of these happened, just pointing out that they can happen.

5. I could also ask you why you have spent your precious time posting on this forum ONLY to bash the MBS program. Unlike you, I am an active member of the SDN community and post about things other than how much MBS sucks. Regardless, we are all free to use our time how we like and I respect your decision to create an SDN account to share your negative MBS experience.

I get it. You feel like you got the short end of the stick and I'm sorry for that. Ultimately, it looks like you still got into medical school so I guess that's a plus. Could you have done it without MBS? Maybe. Maybe not.

I feel like I had a great experience, so I am deciding to share that with others. I agree to disagree with you and will continue to answer any questions people have about the program from my perspective.
1. Just because you and few other people got in doesn't mean people should do MBS program.

2. You post links for campus visits and you get to give those tour$. You incentivize others to recruit into the program and you get paid.

3. You have spare time, which explains why you are trying to make some money off people. I am just warning people who might otherwise be misinformed.

4. If you have no information about why MBS graduates got rejected by all US med schools, then I don't think there is a need for you to make assumptions.

5. I did not get into any US medical school after MBS and I am not in one. Many of my friend did not. Some went to other countries, which is a lot less desirable and you dont need the MBS to get into those.

If my friends and I were not good enough candidates for US med schools, why did the MBS accept us in the first place? The answer is $.

I feel like I had a terrible experience, so I am deciding to share that with others. I feel deceived, scammed, and taken advantage of. I agree to disagree with you and will answer any questions people have about the program form my perspective as well.
 
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ABC13

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Just got my acceptance and am super excited about the opportunity!

@DJ_MD do you mind sharing how you think this program my help my chances of gaining admission? I've already applied once, but unfortunately did not receive any interview invites. My MCAT was 85th percentile, but my uGPA was low at about a 3.45. I also applied a little later into the cycle, but I'm not really sure how much that played into my end result. I'm currently debating among a few programs that I've been accepted to, and want to get a better understanding of what is offered prior to submitting my deposit.

@iobu, do you mind sharing the MCAT range of you and your friends who did not receive acceptances? You mentioned earlier that you suggest students invest their money into getting a higher MCAT score, and while my MCAT is by no means terrific, I feel comfortable enough with it and do not want to risk retaking the test and getting a lower score.

Thanks for all of your input!
 
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Adrenaline_Junkie

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Just got my acceptance and am super excited about the opportunity!

@DJ_MD do you mind sharing how you think this program my help my chances of gaining admission? I've already applied once, but unfortunately did not receive any interview invites. My MCAT was 85th percentile, but my uGPA was low at about a 3.45. I also applied a little later into the cycle, but I'm not really sure how much that played into my end result. I'm currently debating among a few programs that I've been accepted to, and want to get a better understanding of what is offered prior to submitting my deposit.

@iobu, do you mind sharing the MCAT range of you and your friends who did not receive acceptances? You mentioned earlier that you suggest students invest their money into getting a higher MCAT score, and while my MCAT is by no means terrific, I feel comfortable enough with it and do not want to risk retaking the test and getting a lower score.

Thanks for all of your input!

First off, Congrats!

I think if your MCAT is 512 or higher then there is no need to re-take, but then again I had a roommate who re-took a pretty high score and scored even better... so I guess it comes down to your risk tolerance. Personally, I would shoot for a 514 or higher to err on the side of caution. For the most part, people seem to improve their MCAT score after the MBS program if you are so inclined to re-take it after classes.

Even without the MBS program, things are getting more competitive every cycle and the MCAT is a huge factor. Plenty of people in the regular applicant pool with MCATs >512 and median GPAs still don't get in. This could be due to issues with their personal statement, IAs, criminal records, or just that the person reading their app was having a bad day.

I think the greatest value of the MBS program is the separate graduate level GPA. I definitely needed this since my undergrad GPA was beyond repair (<3.0 sGPA and 3.1 cGPA, which included 20 units of postbacc courses at a CC with A's in all 20 units). If you have a solid MCAT score and do well in MBS you should do well during the application cycle. This has proven to be true for me and my friends who did MBS. I had three interviews this cycle and absolutely none the previous cycle I applied before MBS. I had an institutional action (won't go into details here) so my app was not exactly perfect either. I did have some pretty significant experiences (scribed for 3+ years & started my own business), so I do think that Tufts looks for these impactful/significant experiences when selecting for students.

Another great thing about the MBS program is the amount of people you meet who can give you good insight on how to edit your PS/application before you submit. I had mock-interviews with current med students at Tufts that were very representative of the real thing and it helped me immensely. You'll find that a lot of people at Tufts are willing to help you and that was extremely refreshing for me coming from a hyper-competitive UC in California.

At the end of the day, there is no denying that the MBS program improves your chances of getting into Tufts if you have their median stats and do well in MBS. You have to remember you are directly competing with some pretty high level applicants when you interview at Tufts. People with MCATs well above 514, crazy life stories, excellent GPAs and more. There were plenty of Ivy-league students at my interview and several more who were doing some pretty incredible things in research or seeking a career change after 10+ years. Doing MBS does not make you a shoo-in at Tufts, but it can really help your chances if you need the GPA boost & fit the profile of what Tufts already looks for in their regular applicant pool.
 
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ABC13

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First off, Congrats!

I think if your MCAT is 512 or higher then there is no need to re-take, but then again I had a roommate who re-took a pretty high score and scored even better... so I guess it comes down to your risk tolerance. Personally, I would shoot for a 514 or higher to err on the side of caution. For the most part, people seem to improve their MCAT score after the MBS program if you are so inclined to re-take it after classes.

Even without the MBS program, things are getting more competitive every cycle and the MCAT is a huge factor. Plenty of people in the regular applicant pool with MCATs >512 and median GPAs still don't get in. This could be due to issues with their personal statement, IAs, criminal records, or just that the person reading their app was having a bad day.

I think the greatest value of the MBS program is the separate graduate level GPA. If you have a solid MCAT score and do well in MBS you should do well during application cycle. This has proven to be true for my friends who did MBS. I had three interviews this cycle and absolutely none the previous cycle I applied before MBS. I had an institutional action (won't go into details here) so my app was not exactly perfect either. I did have some pretty significant experiences (scribed for 3+ years & started my own business), so I do think that Tufts looks for these impactful/significant experiences when selecting for students.

Another great thing about the MBS program is the amount of people you meet who can give you good insight on how to edit your PS/application before you submit. I had mock-interviews with current med students at Tufts that were very representative of the real thing and it helped me immensely. You'll find that a lot of people at Tufts are willing to help you and that was extremely refreshing for me coming from a hyper-competitive UC in California.

At the end of the day, there is no denying that the MBS program improves your chances of getting into Tufts if you have their median stats and do well in MBS. You have to remember you are directly competing with some pretty high level applicants when you interview at Tufts. People with MCATs well above 514, crazy life stories, excellent GPAs and more. There were plenty of Ivy-league students at my interview and several more who were doing some pretty incredible things in research or seeking a career change after 10+ years. Doing MBS does not make you a shoo-in at Tufts, but it can really help your chances if you need the GPA boost & fit the profile of what Tufts already looks for in their regular applicant pool.
Thank you so much for your response and the information! Do you mind if I message you about some more specifics? Some of the things you mentioned actually apply to myself as well, so I'd love to get your opinion on things if possible.
 
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iobu

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Just got my acceptance and am super excited about the opportunity!

@DJ_MD do you mind sharing how you think this program my help my chances of gaining admission? I've already applied once, but unfortunately did not receive any interview invites. My MCAT was 85th percentile, but my uGPA was low at about a 3.45. I also applied a little later into the cycle, but I'm not really sure how much that played into my end result. I'm currently debating among a few programs that I've been accepted to, and want to get a better understanding of what is offered prior to submitting my deposit.

@iobu, do you mind sharing the MCAT range of you and your friends who did not receive acceptances? You mentioned earlier that you suggest students invest their money into getting a higher MCAT score, and while my MCAT is by no means terrific, I feel comfortable enough with it and do not want to risk retaking the test and getting a lower score.

Thanks for all of your input!
give and take around 510. which correlated around 80th percentile.

If money is not a factor in the equation and your family is printing cash, by all means go for the program.

My suggestion is to see this as an investment: You are buying the medical doctor degree at a too high price by investing another 2 years of opportunity cost + $60k+(interest) on top of the medical school tuition that you will pay.

Instead, I think it could work better for you if you did the following:
1. Get a medical research related job (which benefits your med school application, creates an income, and can even benefit your future residency application).
2. Take courses to boost uGPA. (courses like physio, micro, anatomy, pathology, pharmacology) at a cheap and easygrader institution.
3. Re-apply.

choice is yours.
 

oceanicvibe

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OP can you please talk more about this program from a pre-dental students perspective?
 
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Adrenaline_Junkie

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OP can you please talk more about this program from a pre-dental students perspective?

I can definitely loop in one of my classmates who was pre-dental to comment on his experience. If you could think of some specific questions to ask him in the meantime, that may help you get a better answer!

@Atdent any insight?
 

grk268

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OP can you please give some guidance on writing the personal statement? should it be a more general aamcas ps (why I want to be a doc, etc) or should it be heavily focused on why tufts specifically will help me achieve the goal of being a doc (and leave out personal experiences that helped me realize why I want to be a doc)? thank you!
 
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Atdent

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I can definitely loop in one of my classmates who was pre-dental to comment on his experience. If you could think of some specific questions to ask him in the meantime, that may help you get a better answer!

@Atdent any insight?
I've actually been in contact with @oceanicvibe regarding pre-dental MBS since last year haha. If anyone else wants more insight on this, shoot me a PM
 
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Adrenaline_Junkie

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OP can you please give some guidance on writing the personal statement? should it be a more general aamcas ps (why I want to be a doc, etc) or should it be heavily focused on why tufts specifically will help me achieve the goal of being a doc (and leave out personal experiences that helped me realize why I want to be a doc)? thank you!

Although I used parts of my 1st AMCAS PS, make sure to answer the prompt given by the MBS program. Generally speaking, it should include motivations behind pursuing a career in medicine, any hardships/challenges you've had along the way, and how the MBS program fits into your plans to strengthen your application before applying to dental/medical school. It can be straight to the point. No need to be super creative. Try to avoid fluffing it up with unnecessary/colorful language.

In my case, I spoke specifically about my background/family values, initial motivations, and my most meaningful clinical experiences. After an unsuccessful application cycle, the next logical step for me was to strengthen my academic credentials by taking medical school level coursework before re-applying. There are lots of options for SMPs. If you have any friends who have done Tufts MBS, I think it would be helpful to incorporate what they think makes Tufts the best place to do your SMP. I personally spoke to the close-knit community, opportunities to work alongside med students at Sharewood/in student orgs, accessible faculty, etc. Anything that you think sets Tufts apart from other institutions. When I give tours, I tell people to write about how they learned first-hand from previous students about these aspects of the Tufts community and to give specific (and brief) examples. I feel like this definitely gives their claims more credibility in the essay. You don't have to name drop people who have done MBS, but it is nice to show that you have "done your homework" about the program.

One last note...

While the essay is important, I do not believe a good essay alone is enough to get you in. For example, if your stats are not up to par, a stellar essay may help, but ultimately your metrics may hold you back. This also rings true for medical school applications, although the bar for MBS is definitely not as high. Looking back on my MBS PS now, it's actually pretty cringey. It has some cliches here and there and doesn't flow very well. I would say my essay was generic and neutral at best. I think my MCAT score and recent post-bacc grades were what got me in. The ADCOMs are aware that your essay can be edited/changed before you apply to medical school, but your past metrics will always follow you. If you can prove your academic potential, the essay is likely not as important (unless you come off as narcissistic or depict yourself in a negative light). You don't need to get too caught up in a poor academic record or make excuses for it. Instead focus on your achievements and how you have grown as a result of your setbacks (if you had any).

Lastly, I will share something physicians and ADCOMs have told me. The personal statement, typically, can only hurt you. Unless you have overcome incredible adversity, your essay should not be overly dramatic or try to be too abstract/creative. While it's true that a well-crafted essay may give you a slight edge, it is safer to write one that is straight to the point and easy to follow. If you are trying to stand out, make sure that you do not stand out for the wrong reasons. Otherwise, most premeds have very similar stories, hobbies, etc. Chances are, there's another applicant just like you out there somewhere. Do not worry too much about this. Write a decent essay, and if your scores are competitive, you should have a shot at getting in. Keep in mind that April is considered "late" in the cycle. As the cycle progresses, seats become limited, and you may need higher than average stats to get in.
 
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DM270

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To add on to the things DJ_MD said (I have not gone through the program yet but I have been accepted):

I used a much shorter version of my Med app PS with some narrowing to focus on Tufts. Like he said, most people have similar stories so it's more impressive to show you have truly researched the school and what it has to offer versus recounting how important shadowing was to you etc. I personally have a pretty unique story so mine did bring that in as an attention grabber but most of it focused on how/when I had academic issues and the opportunity that an SMP would provide me. Then focused more on why I'm a good addition to Tufts and why Tufts is perfect for me, etc. Sharewood was a big draw for me so I definitely brought that up.

OP can you please give some guidance on writing the personal statement? should it be a more general aamcas ps (why I want to be a doc, etc) or should it be heavily focused on why tufts specifically will help me achieve the goal of being a doc (and leave out personal experiences that helped me realize why I want to be a doc)? thank you!
 
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grk268

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To add on to the things DJ_MD said (I have not gone through the program yet but I have been accepted):

I used a much shorter version of my Med app PS with some narrowing to focus on Tufts. Like he said, most people have similar stories so it's more impressive to show you have truly researched the school and what it has to offer versus recounting how important shadowing was to you etc. I personally have a pretty unique story so mine did bring that in as an attention grabber but most of it focused on how/when I had academic issues and the opportunity that an SMP would provide me. Then focused more on why I'm a good addition to Tufts and why Tufts is perfect for me, etc. Sharewood was a big draw for me so I definitely brought that up.
thank you both for your advice, it clarified a lot!!
 
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TryingHarder

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I've been accepted to both this program and BU MAMS and I'm really having a tough time picking between the two. I'm not sure if this is the best place to ask since this is a Tufts thread and there will be a bit of bias lol, but I was wondering if anyone here could give some input as to what they would go with.
 

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Would you rather go to BUSM or TUSM?

At this point in time I don't really have a preference, I'd be absolutely delighted to be able to get into either since I'm really in no position to choose, hence needing this program. I guess I kind of just want to get a feel for if anyone's heard anything or had any experiences that would sway them one way or the other in terms of this MBS program and BU MAMS. Sorry I can't give a more definitive answer as I am still trying to figure out what I want.
 

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At this point in time I don't really have a preference, I'd be absolutely delighted to be able to get into either since I'm really in no position to choose, hence needing this program. I guess I kind of just want to get a feel for if anyone's heard anything or had any experiences that would sway them one way or the other in terms of this MBS program and BU MAMS. Sorry I can't give a more definitive answer as I am still trying to figure out what I want.
I was in the same situation (accepted to BU MAMS and Tufts MBS), and I chose Tufts because I heard BU MAMS is a tougher program which I do not doubt. BU is known to be a hard-grader. However, I regret having done SMP at all.
 
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Adrenaline_Junkie

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I've been accepted to both this program and BU MAMS and I'm really having a tough time picking between the two. I'm not sure if this is the best place to ask since this is a Tufts thread and there will be a bit of bias lol, but I was wondering if anyone here could give some input as to what they would go with.

See below for reasoning... but I also wanted to include this story for what its worth. I started a research internship this year with 6 other students, they were all from BU MAMS and I was the only one from Tufts. Out of the 6 people, only 2 knew each other and the others were only meeting for the first time. This was after being in the same program for a YEAR. That stuck out as super weird to me and I felt like it spoke to how fragmented their class typically is. Although I am not necessarily best friends with my entire MBS class, we all knew each other and have cordial relationships if not close friendships within the class. If community is important to you, you are more likely to find this sort of support at Tufts.

I was in the same situation (accepted to BU MAMS and Tufts MBS), and I chose Tufts because I heard BU MAMS is a tougher program which I do not doubt. BU is known to be a hard-grader. However, I regret having done SMP at all.

I echo this statement. BU typicallys keep their MAMS class very separate from the med students and this "second class citizen" vibe didn't sit well with me. That being said, I think the program is more rigorous and therefore if you have a 4.0 from BU MAMS it may hold more weight than a 4.0 from Tufts MBS. I told myself I would rather go somewhere a bit more chill so I could continue to explore my other interests outside of school and stay sane during the program.
 
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DM270

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Congrats on both acceptances! So I am for sure biased because Tufts was my top choice and where I am going in the Fall so take that with a grain of salt. I had minimal intention of doing an SMP until the beginning of February. I was still very much in the MD cycle and it wasn't until I spoke with an admissions officer that said having the separate SMP gpa for my specific scenario would be very helpful for my app. So I began looking at and contacting truly about 2 dozen SMPs around the country. I felt late to the party, given a lot of SMPs had already begun acceptances and I had spent the year looking only at med programs, not SMPs. Through all of this correspondence, Tufts stood out above them all. From every email I sent to the virtual information sessions to simply calling when lost in the city and trying to find the school, every single person I have spoken to seemed like they actually cared. Maybe that's a dumb reason to go to a school and if your only concern is having the most competitive edge for your app, then as another poster said, doing great at BU may be the better choice because it is known as a very rigorous program. But for me, after years in an uber-competitive premed university, it's important to me to not only have classmates that know each other but faculty that will help, an administration that will vouch for you, and an entire medical community committed to their students. I, in fact, flew up and was able to meet with the administration to put a face to my application and story and was accepted 2 days later. 11 days after submitting my application. I think each school is what you make it and I know it's the right fit for me. Good luck!


I've been accepted to both this program and BU MAMS and I'm really having a tough time picking between the two. I'm not sure if this is the best place to ask since this is a Tufts thread and there will be a bit of bias lol, but I was wondering if anyone here could give some input as to what they would go with.
 
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DM270

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Mind sharing your stats and any suggestion on personal statement?


Sent from my iPhone using SDN

For sure, so my MCAT was 497 and my overall GPA was a 3.35 and sGPA of 3.08. I will say, for full disclosure, I have an extensive number of extracurriculars and background stories/info that I do feel supported these numbers. As for the personal statement, my biggest piece of advice if you really want to go to Tufts, not just any SMP that will take you, is to be honest and specific about that intention. Show them why you're a great addition to the class they're building and how Tufts specifically will help you in your career.
 
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horses60223

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How long does it take for a decision? Submitted my app a couple of weeks ago and still haven't heard anything.
 

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I got into this but it's so absurdly unacceptably astronomically expensive I don't see the point unless you have rich parents or not a care in the world. 80k+? yikes
 
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DM270

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I got into this but it's so absurdly unacceptably astronomically expensive I don't see the point unless you have rich parents or not a care in the world. 80k+? yikes

Yea I'll agree with that, every SMP I have seen is SO pricey and I can't figure out why even compared to other master's programs
 
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