James105

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So... I was lucky enough to be accepted to all four programs for global health!! I am super excited, but i am now in a bind in terms of deciding which one to attend.

It seems that Hopkins has the best program set up for a one year MPH.
Pro: it is almost a full year, and on the quarter system so you can fit the most into one year.

Con: It is the most expensive, and I am not all that excited about Baltimore

Harvard
Pro: It has the harvard humanitarian initiative which provides a cutting edge exposure to humanitarian aid research.

con: semester, very policy based, and not as friendly to masters students

Emory
Pro: great school with CDC next door, cheaper cost of living

Con: also very expensive, and it isn't the top name in the field

UNC
Pro: awesome location and great reputation

Con: not known for its global health program.

What do you guys think? Which is the best for global health (particularly in humanitarian aid research)?
 

EpiPepi11

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All are great schools so congrats! But just a minor correction that may or may not sway your vote, Harvard is not really Semester in the strictest sense of the word. Semesters are split in to Fall1 Fall2 Winter Spring1 and Spring2. Some courses will span the full semester most biostats courses but most of your classes will only be half a semester or 8 weeks.
 
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Awapi

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Emory
Pro: great school with CDC next door, cheaper cost of living

Con: also very expensive, and it isn't the top name in the field

What do you guys think? Which is the best for global health (particularly in humanitarian aid research)?

James105, I can mostly just speak to Emory since that's where I'm a student now (one final away from halfway done!), I am a Global Epi (GLEPI) student, but I started out GH and still work a lot with that department since I'm jointly in it and EPI.

Emory is a great school for Global Health, most students in GH and GLEPI (and also some of the non-global concentrations) do a Global Field Experience between their first and second years. My friend left today for hers in Kahzakstan, I leave next week for Kenya, and I have friends who are going to Bangladesh, Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia, South Africa, Paraguay, Ghana, Honduras, Guatemala, Liberia, Thailand, and literally, many many more. There are two funding sources within the school, GHI and then Rollins itself has a Global Field Experience fund. Many students don't need it because their project is funded through the organization they are traveling with. Rollins has been doing this program for years so organizations like the CDC, CARE, the Carter Center and other NGOs have come to rely on the assistance of students during the summer months and plan projects around that. Personally, I am leading a project and will be in Kenya for almost 4 months. This is an amazing opportunity to build relationships and connections and also to get practical field experience in global health. I believe that the quality of the work placements is very unique at Emory because of the long-standing reputation of the GFE program and what students are able to do. You can really find a GFE that is suited to your interests and get a great deal of experience out of it.

I know a lot of second years leaving to work abroad with the Carter Center on Guinea worm and in fellowships with the CDC and other organizations which they got by building connections while at Emory.

I would be wary of the 1 year MPH at JHU...I also thought about it, but was told to be careful because it's difficult to fit the info you need into just one year. I'm VERY glad I decided against it, I have so much left to learn and most of my classes at Emory are very fast-paced, I couldn't imagine trying to be done completely at this point. However, most of the information is learning Biostats and computer programs like SAS, STATA, Sudaan, Epi Info, etc. If you aren't that concerned with the epi/bios side of PH then it might not affect you as much. That's just my 2 cents though, it's obviously a very well regarded school, but I really think the quality and quantity of what you get out of school is more important than the name when you are talking about choosing between the #1 and #6 school.

Good luck! I leave next week and won't have electricity so no internet, but feel free to PM me in the meantime if you have any specific questions!
 

epigirl2012

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As an incoming Johns Hopkins MPH student, I have to disagree with Awapi. I think it is very easy to get everything you want out of the 1 year MPH program. You definitely have to be more organized, but the way how the summer is set up with courses and all of the different information sessions they provide, I am more than positive that I will have a concrete plan of action by the time first term starts. You will have the opportunity to go abroad if you want--yes you won't have a full summer, but you will have at least 4 weeks. I don't think doing an 11 month program will affect the quality or quantity of my education. I will be focusing on epidemiology and I think the way they have the courses planned out is wonderful. The most beneficial part of this program is that in 11 months you are able to get back into the work force. Yes tuition is high, but if you factor in the fact you are only paying for 11 months worth of living expenses versus two years (and also split your tuition in half) it isn't a bad financial deal. I definitely would be happy to answer any specific questions about Hopkins.
At the end of the day, it doesn't really matter what I or anyone else thinks. You have to go with the school that fits your academic and professional interests the best.
 
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