Aug 21, 2017
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Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Thank you in advance for your time; it's greatly appreciated!
My dilemma is that I'm not going to have any assistance paying for my cost of living or tuition throughout my journey to become a doctor. Many have said, "Just take out loans! You'll be a hotshot doctor; med school will be pennies!" but with today's average debt soaring, the thought of $250-$500k in loans is egregious (cant forget about the interest acurring throughout school!).

I am a 20-year-old non-trad student and Ive already finished my English pre-reqs and taken a few 'elective' classes. This fall semester I'll be starting my intro chemistry class and finishing last math class. So, I'm only three terms in taking about 12 credits each term maintaing a 3.9 Gpa.

I want to get some perpective on my plan and figure out if my solution is viable.
Here it is: I'm working in an extremely profitable sales position where I'm only required to work ~30-35 hours a week. If I were to work all the way until matriculation to medical school, I would be able to save enough money to cover my entire tution and cost of living.
However, in order to work, do extracurriculars, and maintain my GPA above a 3.8, I predict I'll only be able to take three classes (about 12 credits) at most per semester and in doing so I would spend six years on my undergraduate.

Would it be wise to just quit my job and take out loans in order to graduate quicker with a larger courseload, or would it be more beneficial to graduate med school with $0 in loans and some money in the bank? Or would I not even be able to matriculate if I only took 12 credits a semester for six years?

Any advice or alternative plan would be extremely helpful!
Again, thank you.
 
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you're a non-trad why?
 
OP
K
Aug 21, 2017
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you're a non-trad why?
I took two years off after high school and I'm working full time while going to school. Sorry if I'm ignorant to the definition of what a non-trad student is, but I would appreciate any advice nonetheless.
 
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Sorry if I'm ignorant to the definition of what a non-trad student
Typically, someone either already with a bachelor's degree trying to revamp oneself, someone with a bachelor's degree or AA that's been out of school for a bit.

You're a traditional student (which is a good thing - you don't have stupidity to recover from or a career to change). Most of us in here are over 25, if not 30 and some of us, or rather me, is over ... 45:thinking:
 
OP
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Aug 21, 2017
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Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Typically, someone either already with a bachelor's degree trying to revamp oneself, someone with a bachelor's degree or AA that's been out of school for a bit.

You're a traditional student (which is a good thing - you don't have stupidity to recover from or a career to change). Most of us in here are over 25, if not 30 and some of us, or rather me, is over ... 45:thinking:
Thanks for explaining! Again, sorry for the ignorance.
 

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Thanks for explaining! Again, sorry for the ignorance.
You're not ignorant :) Just didn't know. Typically, still in college people your age post in the pre-med forum above this one so that it gets more traction.

Best of luck to you on your path! If I could say one thing, don't be stupid :) I work full time, did not ever take a full load during the recent pre-req journey. Do not underestimate the time commitment to some of the classes (especially like a 3 cr orgo class or 3 cr physics or 3 cr biochemistry or 2 cr orgo lab). Those classes are time blasters.

Going to med school debt free is unusual for almost everyone, no matter the age. Best laid plans tend to not work out.

Just know that no matter when/how many classes you take, the only thing that will matter is the grade. That you worked full time or 35 hours a week, won't matter meaning, it won't "help" in some odd way with a "B" in a class. It's still a "B".
 

esob

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Typically, someone either already with a bachelor's degree trying to revamp oneself, someone with a bachelor's degree or AA that's been out of school for a bit.

You're a traditional student (which is a good thing - you don't have stupidity to recover from or a career to change). Most of us in here are over 25, if not 30 and some of us, or rather me, is over ... 45:thinking:
I got nothing behind my name :eek: but I'm real old like you so I can still say I'm non trad :D
 

septalridge

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Dec 29, 2016
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Thank you in advance for your time; it's greatly appreciated!
My dilemma is that I'm not going to have any assistance paying for my cost of living or tuition throughout my journey to become a doctor. Many have said, "Just take out loans! You'll be a hotshot doctor; med school will be pennies!" but with today's average debt soaring, the thought of $250-$500k in loans is egregious (cant forget about the interest acurring throughout school!).

I am a 20-year-old non-trad student and Ive already finished my English pre-reqs and taken a few 'elective' classes. This fall semester I'll be starting my intro chemistry class and finishing last math class. So, I'm only three terms in taking about 12 credits each term maintaing a 3.9 Gpa.

I want to get some perpective on my plan and figure out if my solution is viable.
Here it is: I'm working in an extremely profitable sales position where I'm only required to work ~30-35 hours a week. If I were to work all the way until matriculation to medical school, I would be able to save enough money to cover my entire tution and cost of living.
However, in order to work, do extracurriculars, and maintain my GPA above a 3.8, I predict I'll only be able to take three classes (about 12 credits) at most per semester and in doing so I would spend six years on my undergraduate.

Would it be wise to just quit my job and take out loans in order to graduate quicker with a larger courseload, or would it be more beneficial to graduate med school with $0 in loans and some money in the bank? Or would I not even be able to matriculate if I only took 12 credits a semester for six years?

Any advice or alternative plan would be extremely helpful!
Again, thank you.
To me, you have to decide what's more important: getting done sooner and taking on debt, or extending your time and being debt-free (not completely clear if your saved financial resources would pay for ug only or ug plus med school). In case you're unaware, I have spoken to folks who, post-residency, have had their med school loans paid off by the hiring institution or med practice they join, so that's something to consider.
 
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