Dec 8, 2009
25
0
Status
Pre-Dental
Hi, I am a freshman who want to go to dental school. I just want to ask everyone about my class schedule. I think other pre-dental students would find it is helpful as well.

4 classes x 4 credits = 16 credits every semester

My freshman year (rightnow):
Fall: Physic1/ Cal1/ Chem1/ FirstYearSenimar (manage to get 4.0)
Spring: Physic 2/ Bio1/ Chem2/ Chinese Culture

Plan for sophomore year:
Fall: OChem1/ Bio2/ Economic/ no idea
Spring: OChem 2/ Upper Bio/ Computer Science/ no idea

In my junior year, I will take 4 upper biology course (2 for each semester):
Fall: genetic/ microbiology/ no idea/ no idea
Spring: immunology/ biochemistry or marine biology/no idea/ no idea

I know that my senior grade (fall) will not matter because I will apply really early in summer.
MY QUESTIONS ARE:

I cannot put anatomy(fall) or physiology (spring) in my first 3 years. These course are 200 levels (lower divison) but contain too many materials. Do you guys think I should take them in my senior year (no summer by the way)? I know that some dental schools highly recommend them.

NO IDEA: I really have no idea for these blanks. I'm afraid of choosing non-science classes (i'm not good, prefer science) because they can lower my GPA. I saw many students just picked whatever class that sounded interesting but then regret taking it. Would you recommend any easy courses you already took in your undergrad studies?

HOPE YOU GUYS GIVE ME SOME ADVICES.
THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
 
Last edited:
Jun 29, 2009
3
0
Status
Pre-Dental
hey! whoo! you're so early in the whole pre-dental process! *wistful* (not really.. haha)

anyways, you seem pretty on track for your science courses. and taking anatomy and physio during your senior won't hurt you at all! schools understand that students are still taking classes (some are still finishing prereqs even) so it's no big. plus, those are just classes that are often strongly recommended, so you're all good. and i'm sure that a good performance in your science courses the previous years will indicate that you are intelligent with a good work ethic. so don't stress about that.

What i did notice is that you are HEAVILY taking science (or science related) courses. which is not a bad thing (esp if you're a science major) but keep in mind that almost all schools require either 1 year (some only a semester) of an English course (that is at least semi-writing intensive). Others require (or recommend) at least one semester of a writing intensive course that is non-English (Philosophy, History, etc.). And still others might require 1-2 semesters of Math (usually Calculus I). So be sure you double check the requirements for the schools you are applying to and maybe that will fill in those No Idea spaces.

But apart from worrying about what will and will not meet dental school needs, you should not be scared to experiment and have fun with your undergraduate studies. In saying this, I don't mean party excessively, but rather to take courses which you think might be fun/interesting (maybe even classes you never expected to take before)...esp in your senior year. You never know what you might find and turn to love, or who you'll be able to meet and become friends with. And you'll always do better in a class you enjoy (even if it does require work) because you won't mind it AS MUCH. At least, based on my own experience. But seriously, if you do get into dental school (or a Masters Program in the Sciences I'm assuming) after graduation, you'll be taking Sciences nonstop. So definitely, take advantage of some different classes offered by your undergraduate college. Plus, it's good to challenge yourself in different ways (I think). You learn things you wouldn't have otherwise (either you really love something or that you really hate something and will know to steer clear of anything related to that subject in the future). And you pick up different sets of skills in more discussion heavy and writing intensive courses (if those are what you're nervous about).

Ultimately it's up to you to fill in the No Ideas. But don't be scared to branch out. And if anything, dental schools look for fairly well-rounded applicants, so there you go. (Or at least I've heard.) :p