blackmi4

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Hey there,

my name is Mike and I go to Michigan State University. I'm a general management major. I took my prereqs at community college and I will graduate from MSU next semester.

I want to go to medical school but I have to take some prereqs to help prepare for the MCAT. I could go to MSU, but I would rather save some money and go to community college. Also, the quality of the teaching and the small classrooms make me prefer my community college anyway.

My question is, will the admissions officers look down on me taking prereqs at the community college even if my grades at the community college and mcat score are good? Could I get into an ivy league school even though I took my prereqs at community college?

Thanks a million!!!

-- mike
 

bravofleet4

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you will suffer a disadvantage taking the classes at CC. think also about where you're going to get your LOR's from.
 

eablackwell

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The above poster is correct. Many schools will look at cc credit as not very thoroughly taught/competitive in comparison to a larger university. However, schools often look at situational issues as well. For instance, I took many of my prereqs at a cc (although it just swapped to a 4 year) but I took classes there because they were the only place with night classes and I have a full time job teaching honors & AP chemistry at a medical prep school. When I expressed my concern while talking to an advisor at one of my preferred schools he seemed to think taking the courses there was perfectly justifiable and would not hinder my application.

My suggestion is if it's only money and not due to job/EC conflicts, I'd go for the state college.
 
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There are a lot of med schools that won't look down on CC credits provided a strong MCAT score supports the rigor of the classwork, but in general top schools aren't among them unless you have a very good reason. If you're willing to notch down your ambitions, then it's much less of a concern.
 

robflanker

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I think it also has to do with what your undergrad GPA was and how CC classes will be viewed.

If you did really well at UG, rocked the MCAT but had to take classes at a CC due to cost or scheduling etc then it will be ok. However, say you did so-so as an undergrad, going to CC isn't really going to help convince you can make the next step up in terms of academic difficult.
 

blackmi4

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Thanks for all the replies.

I am definitely leaning in the direction of going to the university now because of your responses. I talked with two advisors and right now I am deciding whether or not I should take the pre-reqs as an undergrad or not. An advisor told me I might be better served if I pursued a masters degree, but I have doubts.

Do you know of a masters program that would cover the pre-reqs for me? My feeling is that a masters program would specialize too much and not provide me with the general information needed for the mcat.

Thanks again my friends!!

-- mike
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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Solution would be to take a few upper level science classes at MSU. You'll improve your chances and application. Having a high mcat will also show that your cc credits were worth it.
 
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Do you know of a masters program that would cover the pre-reqs for me? My feeling is that a masters program would specialize too much and not provide me with the general information needed for the mcat.
You are correct. There is no masters program that includes all the prerequisites. You would be better served to do an informal postbac, taking the prerequisites at any 4-year school that's cheap and convenient or to stay at your current school and delay your graduation while you get them started.