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US MD in Australia?

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Novakaine

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This is just a curiosity question. I'm sure other people have wondered too. Say one goes to a US med school, receives their MD, and does their residency/ fellowship in the US, could they practice in Australia? What obstacles would they face? :confused: :confused:
 

Medstart108

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I don't think there are many obstacles at all. EVERY COUNTRY wants a fully licensed doctor trained in a western country (with the US as an exception).

The only reason there are so many restrictions on residency is because the country pays to train residents, fully trained doctors can only be a good thing to a country. I don't think there would be too many problems.
 
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pitman

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First, finish at least 2 years post-grad training in the US.

Then you have options for how/when to come:

A) After the two years, you can get your full medical registration here fast-tracked (via the Competent Authority Pathway), which means no AMC exams, but you'd still need a year of supervision before getting registration, which means a year here before you can apply for Permanent Residency (PR), needed in order to start training in most specialty training colleges here. While working towards registration, you're pretty much restricted to being an RMO (house officer) in a larger public hospital. After getting registration, you can continue as a house officer or can also locum while waiting on getting your PR (or apply to a training college that doesn't require PR, such as ACRRM or rural GP training -- though doublecheck as they keep changing the damn requirement). PR can take 6mos to 2yrs to get after registration, though from what I've seen and done, if you go through the state sponsorship route is on the shorter end of that range.

http://www.amc.org.au/index.php/ass/apo/cap

B) Nearly complete your specialist training, and apply via the Specialists-in-training pathway, which if you can get a training position offer allows you to fast-track things even more. But you can only do up to two years of specialty training through this method.

http://www.amc.org.au/index.php/ass/apo/spp/sitpsv

C) Complete your postgrad training in the US, then apply through the Specialty Training route, through which your specialty training is assessed, skipping the AMC supervision requirement but normally requires examination and/or supervision for 1+ years under the specialty college. The process varies by specialty. Generally speaking, to do this you need to have been offered a job in an Area of Need (essentially, a job that at the state level has been determined to be difficult to fill -- from easy to find, if you're a family practitioner, to extremely difficult to find, for some specialties).

http://www.amc.org.au/index.php/ass/apo/spp/spfr
http://www.amc.org.au/index.php/ass/apo/spp/aonsp

D) If you are training/trained as a rural generalist (or family practitioner), there is yet another process, presumably slightly easier than for C), but I do not know the specific differences. This is done through the rural GP college here (ACRRM):

http://www.acrrm.org.au/img-program

For any of the above, you would fall under the Moratorium, which requires you to work in an Area of Need for 5-10 years (depending on how rural you are) after the date at which you got full medical registration through the AMC. Training time is excepted from that requirement.
 
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pitman

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xxx
 
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pitman

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Correction to my previous post: as I now recall, I was not able to locum until I had my Permanent Residency. So in the meantime, still under a temporary resident doctor visa (usu a 457), which ties you to a particular hospital or even a department, unless they let you seek a job elsewhere (you can always look for another job and quit after the new job agrees to sponsor you -- I think you have 30 days after leaving a sponsoring job before you need to find another sponsor, or you have to leave the country). After getting PR, you're pretty much free to do what you want, within the confines of the Moratorium.
 
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mehmood 111

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hello everyone, I seek for help about this supervised position after EICS certificate, basically
I am an IMG with two year US clinical experince and just received my EICS certificate. I have some confusion as what is the next step in terms of registration and then actually getting that supervised training for a year. I am going through different site but still unable to find the right link as to where should I apply for this particular position, is it the same internship spot that everyone says is extremely difficult to get or if I should contact some other agency or follow some other process.
really appreciate the help.
 

Leforte

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If you are on the Competent Authority Pathway, and have an advanced standing certificate, then you can get any resident level position or higher, if you are lucky. It does not need to be an internship position, which makes things easier. Look at each state's public hospitals junior doctor recruiting websites, they often list positions when they are available. Once you are offered a position, you then apply to AHPRA for a limited license with the advanced standing certificate. Then there are many, many more steps after that to get to general registration, but this should start you off.

If you only have an EICS verification, but do not meet the other requirements for the Competent Authority Pathway, you'll need to sit the AMC exams.
 
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mehmood 111

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Really appreciate your comprehensive reply.I just have one more question- Is there any role of a recuitment agency that I might contact for the level of position I am seeking for? thanks
 
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