VA ER Closure

Discussion in 'Military Medicine' started by Chonal Atresia, 09.19.14.

  1. SDN is made possible through member donations, sponsorships, and our volunteers. Learn about SDN's nonprofit mission.
  1. Chonal Atresia

    Chonal Atresia 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    08.23.08
    Messages:
    296
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    For everyone considering working at the VA after active duty, you should read this article. This is what happens to your ER when you pay your physicians peanuts compared to what they can earn in the private sector. Somehow, the real reason for the closure never made it into the article. Until the government pays VA physicians commisurate to what they can make in civilian medicine, these problems will never end.

    http://abc11.com/health/fayetteville-va-emergency-room-to-temporarily-shut-down/314090/
     
  2. SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads.
  3. notdeadyet

    notdeadyet Still in California SDN Moderator 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.23.04
    Messages:
    11,483
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I'm not really seeing that this ties to VA salaries. Lots of VAs are moving in this direction. An ER is an expensive beast to run without the volume.

    VA ERs have also gotten in trouble because the lack of facilities in the hospital backing it. An ER with no cath lab or other facilities can make thee placese sometimes not much better than glorified triages. For lots of VAs, this is a good move.
     
  4. Chonal Atresia

    Chonal Atresia 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    08.23.08
    Messages:
    296
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    You did not read the article thoroughly. The ER is not "moving in this direction," they had no choice at this point in time because they have no ER physicians. They are actively pursuing another contract in order to make their dysfunctional ER functional again.
     
  5. j4pac

    j4pac PM&R resident 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    08.22.05
    Messages:
    2,121
    NH Pensacola just lost their ER. It was underutilized and they couldn't justify keeping it open. Instead they replaced it a urgent care clinic staffed by non-ER trained physicians.

    The problem with the move to urgent care is that ambulances can't deliver to an urgent care clinic, so the hospital loses it's primary means of admission. As of now NH Pensacola has an inpatient until and one ICU bed (primarily as a holding spot for ICU transfers). They are going to lose their inpatient service without an ER. There is just no way that the admissions from clinic will be high enough to keep that boat afloat. They are losing their residency program as well.

    It's a short sighted decision in my opinion. When big Navy sees all of their patients are going to the civilian sector for ER visits and even more so hospital admissions, they will reconsider. They will realize that though the ER may be a loss...that the benefits gained by having an inpatient unit is a net gain. It would also allow more residents to stay within the Navy Hospitals.
     
    Last edited: 09.19.14
  6. fez68w

    fez68w Combat Medic 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    05.11.14
    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Fort Riley
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Verified
    Army
    I like the journalist's words at 1:45

    :)
     
  7. deuist

    deuist Stealthfully Sarcastic Lifetime Donor 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    06.14.04
    Messages:
    4,300
    Location:
    Florida
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Verified
    Physician
    Verified
    Air Force
    The article was about VA hospitals, not military facilities. That being said, the military should absolutely get out of the business of medicine – particularly in these cases when they cannot sustain an appropriate volume to keep an emergency department, inpatient unit, or even an entire hospital open. Many of the smaller active duty hospitals are struggling to reach 50% occupancy of the inpatient side, meaning that the units are hemorrhaging money. If these were civilian hospitals they would all go bankrupt and be closed unless they were in a high needs area.
     
  8. j4pac

    j4pac PM&R resident 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    08.22.05
    Messages:
    2,121
    But you have to consider the cost of sending a patient to the civilian sector vs military hospital. It's significantly higher...so in the grand scheme of things...it may still be worth it to keep the Navy hospitals open. Not to mention that I do believe that there is an intrinsic benefit of having a military hospital and anyone who has ever worked at a Branch clinic knows this. Administratively it is significantly harder dealing with civilian hospitals.
     
  9. Chonal Atresia

    Chonal Atresia 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    08.23.08
    Messages:
    296
    Status:
    Attending Physician
  10. HighPriest

    HighPriest insert "clever" statement 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    01.01.08
    Messages:
    1,064
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Verified
    Army
    Is that really hard to believe? Stupid, yes, but hard to believe? People just don't know what that means, and they've become used to spoon feeding as a means of survival.
     

About the ads

Share This Page