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What are my chances?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by NJHopeful, Aug 26, 1999.

  1. NJHopeful

    NJHopeful Junior Member

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    Dear Dr. Henderson,

    I am 31 years old. I graduated in 1990 from the University of Vermont with a BA in Environmental Studies, minor in Philosophy. After graduation I worked for 3 years as a lobbyist in NY State on environmental and public health issues. I worked with the AMA and other health groups to pass the NY State Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention law.

    My husband and I moved back to my hometown in NJ in 1995. I then worked for a high-technology medical imaging equipment company for two years, where I interacted with Drs and other health professionals giving presentations at professional meetings and conferences both in the US and overseas.

    I would finally like to fulfill my dream of becoming a Dr. I would need a post-bacc program. My GPA from college is only 3.2 overall (3.6 in my major). Will this hurt my chances significantly even if I do well in a post-bacc and on the GMAT?

    Also, I have a strong volunteer background in teaching English to disadvantaged immigrants with Literacy Volunteers of America. I am currently an email volunteer with Sidelines, an organization that supports women on bedrest due to high-risk pregnancies. I myself had a high-risk pregnancy and last November gave birth to identical twin girls. I am especially interested in pediatrics and the special medical and emotional needs of multiples.

    I am most interested in attending the Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry here in NJ. What steps do you think I should take to increase my chances of being accepted when I apply?

    Can you also address "shadowing" doctors to obtain clinical experience before applying to med school and when this is typically done. Are there better ways to obtain clinical experience?

    Also, do you think I can succeed in med school and still be adequately involved with my family?

    Thank you very much!

    Sincerely,
    NJ Hopeful
     
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  3. Henry

    Henry Senior Member

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    You have impressive experience already. An additional clinical experience will definitely enhance your chances. However, your GPA may be a factor to be consider! Different medical school review their applicant different.

    Typically, allopathic medical schools focus on academic performance.
    However, osteopathic schools tend to look at the overall picture of the applicant.

    My advice, find out more about DO and apply to both allopathic and osteopathic schools. Good luck
     
  4. Jim Henderson

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    I agree with Henry on everything! Your experience is indeed wonderful... by the way, my wife is at 32 weeks and has been on bedrest since 8 weeks (yes, 24 weeks on her back now!) We lost our little girl at 23 weeks last year and she was beginning to have troubles at 8 weeks this time and went on bedrest and has never gotten up! If you could e-mail her with info on your group I'd appreciate it... [email protected]
    Thanks!

    Continuing with you: You will stand out on any application and in any interview. Your life and volunteer experience are phenominal!

    Getting past the gpa will be your biggest challenge, and doing a post-bac may help with that though no guarantees.

    I assume you mean MCAT rather than GMAT? A strong MCAT will go a long ways in making up for the GPA.

    Henry is right... osteopathic schools will also be a good option for you. Apply to both allopathic and osteopathic, and apply to quite a few... it may be quite random where you get interviews... and if you get interviews, YOU will have a great chance at getting in!

    Shadowing doctors isn't completely necessary. In fact, I didn't do that. It is more necessary with many osteopathic medical schools and hopefully some osteopaths in this message center may be able to give you some specifics. If interested, I'd suggest posting that question in the osteopathic forums on this page.

    It is possible to get through medical school and maintain a family. However, it is difficult and there absolutely will be moments when you can't be there for them, nights you won't come home, nights you will have to study more than be with the family, etc. Make sure you and your husband / significant other are on the same wavelength before you go through with it!

    Hope this helps... I don't have all the answers and what I say isn't Gospel, but I think you have the makings of an excellent doc some day and wish you the best!

    Thanks!

    ------------------
    Jim Henderson, MD of MedicalStudent.net http://www.medicalstudent.net


    [This message has been edited by medicalstudent.net (edited August 26, 1999).]
     

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