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Medical What are the challenges of a new medical school?

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MusicDOc124

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What are some challenges that are not obvious when attending a new medical school?

I understand growing pains with curricular changes, minimal mentorship, no resources from upperclassmen, no established traditions/clubs, exam alignment to Steps, etc BUT what are challenges often not discussed with new medical schools?

There are tons of pros and cons of attending a new medical school.

Also will not being fully accredited impact residency? It is to my understanding that full accreditation isn’t granted until the first class graduates. How will this impact me, if at any?

One of the biggest, though it's mentioned frequently (you just didn't list it), is rotation sites, and if you'll need to move for them. Also whether or not they've had student before even if from other schools.

The accreditation in this case will not affect you at all.
 
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They may have less services available for struggling students (academically, physically and mentally).

Because they're new AND med schools are cash cows (in the DO world), they less willing to dismiss failing students. Said student get caught up in a cycle of fail -> remediate, fail -> remediate until Boards, when they fail and then get dismissed with two years of debt.

PDs are unfamiliar with the school, and its grads, and thus may be more hesitate to hire them

New schools will not have any established research programs.
 

TheBoneDoctah

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Rotations and a reputable program with a track record of putting out solid graduates. Many times on the interview trail, PDs mentioned the school I was from (DO school that's been around a long time) and said that they have had many amazing students come through from our program. That always helps. Also, as said above, sometimes rotations are not solid yet and they can change from year to year. One year the school may have a rotation, the next it's gone.

That being said, I interviewed and was accepted to a brand new school (I would have been the second class I believe) and didn't attend solely because of the reasons above. They are now doing amazing and have great match lists so new schools can do amazing in their beginning years.
 
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Ok thank you both for your input.
My medical school is a public MD school in a large urban center. I am hoping they arent cash cows as the entire inaugural class has received a scholarship, the school has significant support from the local governance, alum, and medical professionals in the city, and has state funding. The school is attached to a Tier 1 public research institution that is well known in the region (maybe not in the nation) and I intend to apply to residencies in my state and practice in my state. Prior to the med school being built, I know there are countless research opportunities particularly within college of pharm and optometry and the social sciences. The medical school, while not fully established, will only add on to the research being conducted but perhaps not in my four years I am there. The university itself is reputable across my state but the COM may not be yet. Will this help me in any way?

I am wanting to pursue PCP and have heard they are less competitive (interested in peds or family med but obvs this may change during medical school; also am not pursuing PCP because they are less competitive). Would I still be at a huge disadvantage for said specialty (given I pass STEP and all clerkships)?

What advice do you recommend (aside from working your butt off academically and during clerkships) during my four years in terms of networking, student clubs, research, or anything I missed? I am required to do research as part of graduation.
You'll be fine at a new MD school
 
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