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What do OTD's actually do?

Discussion in 'Occupational Therapy [ O.T.D ]' started by Music333, Jun 16, 2008.

  1. Music333

    2+ Year Member

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    So, as opposed to MSOTs, what do OTDs actually do? I've heard they can do administrative work or research. What kind of research do they do? Are they trying to find alternative ways to do OT activities or actually research the disabilities? Do OTDs that do the same work as MSOTs get paid the same?
     
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  3. Elbrus

    Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    I'm not an OT, but the FAQ page of the AOTA may be of some help: http://www.aota.org/Students/FAQDegrees.aspx
    Many of your questions are on this site.
    You take extra courses on admin, research, etc. but you are not required to have a OTD to work in either of these areas. I believe the starting salary for someone with either degree is the same, but promotions may happen more quickly with the doctoral degree. I recall seeing statistics (I think from the APTA) that people with a DPT vs. masters degree worked up the career ladder more quickly.
     
  4. BUSportsMed

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    Just curious, but in what ways do physical therapists work up the career ladder? I mean, what other options are available. I'm in physical therapy school right now and planned to work as, well, a physical therapist, and hopefully open up a private practice- always thought that was as good as it got haha.
     
  5. Elbrus

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    Career laddering within PT usually includes two professional tracts with different levels either following clinical and administrative duties. Clinical promotions are usually based on years of experience, board certifications or credentials. Or you can move towards administrative positions in management, program development, etc. Each promotion involves a greater degree of responsibility, challenge, higher compensation packages and/or practice partnership.
     
  6. superCOTA

    superCOTA MS, OT by 2011 !!!
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    OTD/DPT's applying for a Therapist position can expect the same pay. Human resources isn't interested.

    A bigger issue it the the DPT writing prescriptions...and when the OTD will be able to do same.

    Then one's ability to run a clinic as a doctor reaps dividends.
     
  7. Bad0 Fish0

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    this is far from always the case. just wanted to point that out.
     
  8. superCOTA

    superCOTA MS, OT by 2011 !!!
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    Hey Bad .. been lurking and see you post w/ common sense .. i do shoot from the hip, and at 1am that can be bad.. but -

    Maybe not always the case, but at a recent sub-acute facility I worked, 2 DPT's came on. Paid what PT's are paid. They aren't doing more for the place. They dont earn the facility more....about 65 every 15 minutes of treamtent time. Just like the assistants, much less the PT's.

    Other areas ...
    At a teaching hospital: Possibly
    Homecare? no way
    Nursing home? no way unless you want to direct the department and then you will earn it...
    School setting? no way if agency referred, A bigger place like NYC board of ed: maybe a higher start but i imagine you top out not to far from the MA's.

    Psych setting? Hmmm.. ... OT has been in and out of the pysch setting, due to reimbursement and political issues.. then OT rallies for it and we get another shot at it ... so maybe a OTD who publishes a paper on one's population and makes the facility recognized could have something. Negotiate that one at the interview well and you may have something :)


    Perhaps I don't know enough about the OTD, but if you aren't getting a reimbursable shingle (NDT, SI, CHT, etc.)...

    I have a post to create on my view of the grand plan with the OTD, especially in relation to the DPT that isn't discussed much...

    but right now that would be off topic, and i have billing to do LOL.
     
    #7 superCOTA, Jun 19, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2008
  9. Bad0 Fish0

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    well in the outpatient arena, which is where the majority of PTs work, they typically are paid more than OTs (in my area anyway). in hospitals the salaries may be the same, but i have one friend who does strictly wound care in the hospital setting and is paid a higher salary than the staff OTs, though i'm not sure if that has anything to do with it or not because she is, technically, a "staff PT". not saying this is the norm, just saying i know enough PTs being paid more than their OT peers to be able to say that it isn't always the case that they are paid the same.

    edit:
    but now that my interest is sparked on the topic.. check out www.bls.gov/oco (a great and reliable resource for ALL careers).. according to them,

    Median annual earnings of occupational therapists were $60,470 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $50,450 and $73,710. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $40,840, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $89,450. Median annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of occupational therapists in May 2006 were:

    Home health care services $67,600
    Nursing care facilities 64,750
    Offices of physical, occupational and speech therapists, and audiologists 62,290
    General medical and surgical hospitals 61,610
    Elementary and secondary schools 54,260


    Median annual earnings of physical therapists were $66,200 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $55,030 and $78,080. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $46,510, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $94,810. Median annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of physical therapists in May 2006 were:



    Home health care services $70,920
    Nursing care facilities 68,650
    General medical and surgical hospitals 66,630
    Offices of physicians 65,900
    Offices of physical, occupational and speech therapists, and audiologists 65,150


    while not a big difference, it's a difference nonetheless which indicates that PTs are paid (slightly) more than OTs in most areas of practice. of course this isn't the case everywhere, but just pointing out that it's not an accepted fact that they are always paid the same. :)
     
  10. superCOTA

    superCOTA MS, OT by 2011 !!!
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    Oops I was looking at that part, the MA vs the OTD. They were both q's of his so we went askew on that one i guess.

    As far as what you mentioned on pt/ot salaries.. OT's arent in clinics as much. PT sports medicine clinics would never be my cup of tea, and for 4K a year, you have to like what you do... he should not make a life altering decision on that subtle difference wouldnt you agree?
     
  11. Bad0 Fish0

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    oh absolutely. neither PT nor OT is going to make you a millionaire (obviously there have been exceptions to this), so you have to really want to do it. i was just pointing out that OTs shouldn't expect that in every setting, in every specific place, that they're going to be paid the same as the PTs working there, because that often isn't true.
     

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