What do Private Practices look at when considering hiring a recent d-school grad

afrosheen

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Is it the name of the school, board scores, clinical requirments, etc?
 

Mustt Mustt

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Is it the name of the school, board scores, clinical requirments, etc?

If they ask you for your baord scores you shouldn't work for them. The dentist that I shadowed hired associates based on their personality and communication skills and then he will have them work 30 days to see of they both like to continue and if not they move on simple. Nobody will care about your board scores and your school name once graduated and have a license to practice.
 
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DrJeff

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If they ask you for your baord scores you shouldn't work for them. The dentist that I shadowed hired associates based on their personality and communication skills and then he will have them work 30 days to see of they both like to continue and if not they move on simple. Nobody will care about your board scores and your school name once graduated and have a license to practice.

There is alot of truth in this statement. If you mesh well with the patients/staff of the practice, and have a treatment philosophy generally similar to the existing Doc/Docs that is what the main criteria tends to be. In some practices I'd go as far as saying that all that matters to them is that you have a valid license and a pulse!:eek: ;)
 

tissy

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Then why is everyone so worried about the reputation of a school if it doesn't matter at the end when you're getting hired??? :confused:
 

drpduck

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Then why is everyone so worried about the reputation of a school if it doesn't matter at the end when you're getting hired??? :confused:

I wonder the same thing. I think it is pre-dents more worried about the reputation of the school then anyone else. I've spent some time on DentalTown and talking to practicing dentists, and they ALL agree that you should go with the cheapest school. How good of a dentist you are seems to be largely an individual effort, not related to how well you did at Columbia Vs. Howard.
 

vaio

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Then why is everyone so worried about the reputation of a school if it doesn't matter at the end when you're getting hired??? :confused:

it matters if you want to specialize.
 

drpduck

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it matters if you want to specialize.

Honestly I think where you go to school has very little to do with specializing. Sure some schools can claim that they have a very high specializing ratio, but I bet it has more to do with the school attracting a certain caliber of students with higher GPA's/DAT and are likely much more competitive, and regardless of the school they go to they would do well on the Board Exam.

Plus how the heck would you know if you want to specialize if you haven't even picked up a handpiece or worked with your first patient yet (myself included)? I absolutely knew I wanted to be a top surgeon in high school until I actually spend time at a hospital and dental practices, and I found dentistry to be a better fit for me. Thus things change, especially over 4 years.

Obviously picking the school right for you is the best choice, but working hard and doing well in classes/board exam is up to you, not your school. That would suck to pick a more expensive school "knowing you are going to specialize" only to get in and love general dentistry, which you could have done just as well in at the much cheaper school.

I'd pick the school you like the most, but just ignoring the cost
"for the reputation" of a school is not a wise idea in my opinion.
 

Billy Gilmore

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Honestly I think where you go to school has very little to do with specializing.

I strongly disagree with that statement. The name of the school on top of the transcript does matter when you are applying for specialties. Certain schools have a reputation for producing students that make excellent residents. It may have more to do with what is required to excel and put yourself in a position to specialize at these schools, but there is still an advantage to attending certain dental schools.
 

drpduck

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I strongly disagree with that statement. The name of the school on top of the transcript does matter when you are applying for specialties. Certain schools have a reputation for producing students that make excellent residents. It may have more to do with what is required to excel and put yourself in a position to specialize at these schools, but there is still an advantage to attending certain dental schools.

Well to each their own. To me a cheaper school matters more then name, but to someone else a name matters more. I guess there really is no right or wrong school, but rather a right or wrong school for you.
 

butch1

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OK, I'll play.........I am currently returning to specialty training after MANY years of very successful practice in a number of settings. The vast majority of my experience is in a group private practice setting where the MOST important factor for success is none other than THE ABILITY TO GET ALONG WELL WITH OTHERS (capitals for obvious emphasis). First and foremost, when we hire a dentist in my practice, we are looking for someone who can get along with our large staff, a vast patient base of varying ages and experiences, and the other partners/dentists. It has little to do with said dentists skill at contouring cervical class2 emergence profiles ! We assume that if new doc graduated from an accredited school with good marks and good recommendations, then he/she will likely be able to practice at some level, and that the level of expertice will rapidly increase from any baseline as time "in the seat" goes by. I will go ahead and commit blasphemy here, and say that "technical excellence" has very little to do with success in practice, but is rather encumbant upon each of us as providers. We are treating PEOPLE not teeth, and the best "technician-dentist" in most cases will not make the best dental practitioner.
So my advise to all those embarking on their clinical career is to be the best PERSON you can be (including technician) and the world will beat a path to your door (and this includes potential employers) !
 

ItsGavinC

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Then why is everyone so worried about the reputation of a school if it doesn't matter at the end when you're getting hired??? :confused:

"Everybody" isn't worried about it. Pre-dental students are the only ones who are, and we try to tell them but they don't listen...
 

ItsGavinC

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I will go ahead and commit blasphemy here, and say that "technical excellence" has very little to do with success in practice, but is rather encumbant upon each of us as providers. We are treating PEOPLE not teeth, and the best "technician-dentist" in most cases will not make the best dental practitioner.
So my advise to all those embarking on their clinical career is to be the best PERSON you can be (including technician) and the world will beat a path to your door (and this includes potential employers) !

Excellent comments and extremely true. As has been said many times before, patients can't see inside their own mouths. There is something to be said for a beautiful restoration on a posterior tooth, but there is also something to be said for the dentist that is caring, likeable, and listens to his patients. The latter is what the patient really cares about. If you can fall in line with those thoughts, the patient will rarely decline tx. plans and won't sue you either.
 
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1992Corolla

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The dentist will sit the potential associate down and see how many crowns he can crank out in an hour and then how many DO's he can do with one carpal of anesthesia.

Done with single elimination bracket style, winner takes all.






j/k:cool:
 

vize

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I strongly disagree with that statement. The name of the school on top of the transcript does matter when you are applying for specialties. Certain schools have a reputation for producing students that make excellent residents. It may have more to do with what is required to excel and put yourself in a position to specialize at these schools, but there is still an advantage to attending certain dental schools.

I agree. If you're not trying to maximize your chances of getting into a specialty, then don't worry about the school's name. At the same time, I know someone from Meharry who got into a top specialty, so I guess it mainly comes down to the individual. But I know that being at a school with faculty members who are the leaders of research couldn't be too shabby. ;) Especially when everyone talks about how research is a "must" for the most competitive specialties. Michigan, UCLA, and others have repeatedly matched graduates at a high percentage. I'm sure this isn't just a coincidence (then again, maybe).
 

SuperC

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Oh yeah! I'm going to Harvard... Now put that in your pipe and smoke it.
-C
 

muz

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the school issue...many say cheap is better...i choose not to goto my cheaper instate cuz i got into an aMaizeing out of state...

pride, and satisfaction are also important while u are working ur butt off during dental school!

it def. gets me through the week knowing that i am lucky to be at my school!
 

amichail

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the school issue...many say cheap is better...i choose not to goto my cheaper instate cuz i got into an aMaizeing out of state...

pride, and satisfaction are also important while u are working ur butt off during dental school!

it def. gets me through the week knowing that i am lucky to be at my school!

They're all FREEKIN expensive, so I agree! go with the one you know your gonna love...;)
 

streethoney

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I am a predent that has been freaking out about school reputation and what not....but now i have no fears....i have been accepted to a school which i think I would be surrounded with fine people....and that's all that matters :)
 

BigEd

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If they ask you for your baord scores you shouldn't work for them. The dentist that I shadowed hired associates based on their personality and communication skills and then he will have them work 30 days to see of they both like to continue and if not they move on simple. Nobody will care about your board scores and your school name once graduated and have a license to practice.


Boy you will have a hard time finding a job. Several dentists want that information.

Good luck. Ed
 

OceanDMD

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Boy you will have a hard time finding a job. Several dentists want that information.

Good luck. Ed


This is absolutely not true. A GPR, experience, similar practice philosophy are of importance. Board scores are rarely significant. I have never been asked for scores, just whether or not Im licensed and like to treat molar endo:p
 

BigEd

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This is absolutely not true. A GPR, experience, similar practice philosophy are of importance. Board scores are rarely significant. I have never been asked for scores, just whether or not Im licensed and like to treat molar endo:p




Listen, from my experience having worked in the dental field, the only and absolutely only time your grades and board scores are not important in dentistry is when you open your own practice which seems to be difficult coming right out of school.

These dentists who don't ask for these are the same ones who promise ownership without even knowing if you can cut a prep.

I would advise strongly against going with a practice that didn't care about how you did in school.
 

BigEd

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This is absolutely not true. A GPR, experience, similar practice philosophy are of importance. Board scores are rarely significant. I have never been asked for scores, just whether or not Im licensed and like to treat molar endo:p




Listen, from my experience having worked in the dental field, the only and absolutely only time your grades and board scores are not important in dentistry is when you open your own practice which seems to be difficult coming right out of school.

These dentists who don't ask for these are the same ones who promise ownership without even knowing if you can cut a prep.

I would advise strongly against going with a practice that didn't care about how you did in school.
 

dentalman

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Listen, from my experience having worked in the dental field, the only and absolutely only time your grades and board scores are not important in dentistry is when you open your own practice which seems to be difficult coming right out of school.

These dentists who don't ask for these are the same ones who promise ownership without even knowing if you can cut a prep.

I would advise strongly against going with a practice that didn't care about how you did in school.

I disagree. I think personalities and practice philosophies are more important than grades. I also don't think most employers look at grades. Grades don't say anything about a dentist's personality or ethics.
 

docj1

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The dentist will sit the potential associate down and see how many crowns he can crank out in an hour and then how many DO's he can do with one carpal of anesthesia.

Done with single elimination bracket style, winner takes all.






j/k:cool:

:laugh:
 

docj1

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I disagree. I think personalities and practice philosophies are more important than grades. I also don't think most employers look at grades. Grades don't say anything about a dentist's personality or ethics.

I agree with you dentalman. Grades are a poor indicator of your ability to practice dentistry in the real world. I own my own practice going on 8 years now, but I was an associate for 2 dentists before I started my practice. I was not asked about grades, just interviewed as a person. I got along great with both and we had and still do have great relationships. I personally was only looking for an associate position until I found where I wanted to practice and I told both of these fine dentists that. They both hired me on the spot. I suspect because I was honest with them. They both have fee for service only practices and I learned alot from both. Personality honesty and ethics goes a long way.
 

Denticized

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My uncle has 6 dentists working for him and he says that the single most important factor in hiring is the "speed" at which they work and that is all. Nothing more. By the way he is looking for two more dentists if anyone is interested in working in Los Angeles suburbs.
 

Lidopaine82

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My uncle has 6 dentists working for him and he says that the single most important factor in hiring is the "speed" at which they work and that is all. Nothing more. By the way he is looking for two more dentists if anyone is interested in working in Los Angeles suburbs.

oh that sounds like a great place to work:rolleyes:
 
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