umean2tellme

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What are you supposed to call PA's? I mean, they're technically not doctors but I have met a few that will get visibly upset when they don't hear doctor in front of their name.
 

txprodigal

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just like all the other workers who aren't physicians...call them mr./mrs./ms. or their first name if they're comfortable with you


everyone is on a first name basis where i volunteer except for the physicians who are referred to as dr. [insert last name]
 
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The PA's I know go by their first name.

And any PA who insists you call him or her "Doctor" is an idiot.
 
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pianola

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The PA I saw in the hospital a couple of summers ago introduced herself as "Dr."
 

Bacchus

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The PA did not go to medical school nor did he or she complete a residency (of the same caliber) that all physicians must complete. He or she is not a doctor.

On that same note, if you want to stand out as the doctor in a hospital DON'T wear your labcoat ;).
 

TRN1983

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What are you supposed to call PA's? I mean, they're technically not doctors but I have met a few that will get visibly upset when they don't hear doctor in front of their name.
Wow... I've never run into that before. I always get a medical assistant who will say "Okay, Mike/Gary/Jane/Lisa/etc, the PA, is on his/her way in." Then the PA introduces him/herself by first name. It seems really silly for a PA to request being called doctor when they're obviously the doctors assistant.
 

student1799

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I volunteered for 2 years in a large ED where there were several PAs regularly on duty. I was very friendly with two of them, who were great people and always happy to answer questions and teach me things, but I always felt awkward that I didn't have a formal title to call them. (Both of them went by first names.) I've always been careful to call all the doctors "Dr.," but I didn't know an equivalently respectful way to address PAs.

I actually mentioned this one day to one of them, and he shrugged and said it didn't bother him a bit to be called "Frank." But it still does bother me, and if someone came up with a real title for PAs, I'd gladly use it. (I don't think it's right to call them "Dr." because they're not doctors.)
 

drcarter77

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in PA its illegal for a PA to tell you they're a doctor, in fact their name tag has to specify that they are a PA
 

TRN1983

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Well, Mr. or Mrs/Ms should do just fine. I don't understand why they have to have a special title. Not everyone needs a special title :)
 
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mmmcdowe

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I had a "doctor" when I went for a checkup who specifically told me that he had gone to this and that medical school, etc, etc, and I later find out that he was a PA. I wrote a letter of complaint, but he had already been fired because of it.
 

majahops

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As a physician, I'm always going to ask that my co-workers, staff and patients call me by my first name. Because my name isn't Doctor <<last name>>, it's Tim... and I want to know them as people and for them to know me as a person, not as a title.

... but I know I'll be pretty unique in that respect, and that's just fine by me :)

Many of the best doctors I know happen to have this policy, and it always just made sense to me.


just like all the other workers who aren't physicians...call them mr./mrs./ms. or their first name if they're comfortable with you


everyone is on a first name basis where i volunteer except for the physicians who are referred to as dr. [insert last name]
 

joshmell

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Maybe you're doing something wrong or they don't like you for some other reason and that's why they seem to get upset? It seems ridiculous that someone would want to be called by a title they didn't earn.
 

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As a physician, I'm always going to ask that my co-workers, staff and patients call me by my first name. Because my name isn't Doctor <<last name>>, it's Tim... and I want to know them as people and for them to know me as a person, not as a title.

... but I know I'll be pretty unique in that respect, and that's just fine by me :)

... I don't think so, Tim.

alborland.gif
 

premedrod

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is PA school only around one year of schooling....wtf? how sad...

reedonkulus
 

majahops

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Actually... I happen to think access is pretty freaking exciting. I've definitely spent many a night messing around with some SQL. You might even say I got freaky with it. Yeah, I guess you could call me a stud muffin.

:eek:

:scared:

:(

Tell me about it. Most exciting news I've had all week was figuring out some new scripts in Microsoft Access.
 
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shaggybill

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The PA's in our ED introduce themselves by their first names, but all of the patients think and call them doctors because they wear white lab coats. The PA's dont mind, and the patients don't know any better, so everybody is happy.
 

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Actually... I happen to think access is pretty freaking exciting. I've definitely spent many a night messing around with some SQL. You might even say I got freaky with it. Yeah, I guess you could call me a stud muffin.

:ninja: hardcore. i just started with database stuff last week. trying to pick between access and filemaker pro.
 

majahops

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Filemaker pro blows balls... but Access is pretty sick. You run queries on it in a language called SQL (albeit a slight variation), which is pretty much the industry standard.

You can do some sweet sweet things with Access though.... Of course, you can do sweeter things with a woman... but let's be honest, if we had a sweet woman to do sweet things with, neither of us would be talking about access on a premed forum on a friday night...

... wow... I think i'll go find out if there are any bullets in that gun over there. :p

:ninja: hardcore. i just started with database stuff last week. trying to pick between access and filemaker pro.
 

Lukkie

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Filemaker pro blows balls... but Access is pretty sick. You run queries on it in a language called SQL (albeit a slight variation), which is pretty much the industry standard.

You can do some sweet sweet things with Access though.... Of course, you can do sweeter things with a woman... but let's be honest, if we had a sweet woman to do sweet things with, neither of us would be talking about access on a premed forum on a friday night...

... wow... I think i'll go find out if there are any bullets in that gun over there. :p

you're probably right. i liked filemaker because its pretty user friendly but i'm already finding some of the limits. guess i should learn some SQL (or the access version of it) to really make some magic. ideally i will be able to integrate access with excel files sometime, being able to pull information from a specific cell on a specific worksheet from a file on a remote server :scared:
 
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majahops

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To be honest, if you're using access, you don't really need excel (in most cases, in some cases, they go together perfectly, but not in most cases). In actuality, access and excel are kind of like calculus and algebra. When you're doing calculus, you're using most or all of the features of algebra, but you're able to put it into fluid motion - you're doing dynamic algebra... Same thing with access, you have built in spreadsheets (in tables), to which you can apply formulas (in queries and or reports)... but you can do sooooo much more.




you're probably right. i liked filemaker because its pretty user friendly but i'm already finding some of the limits. guess i should learn some SQL (or the access version of it) to really make some magic. ideally i will be able to integrate access with excel files sometime, being able to pull information from a specific cell on a specific worksheet from a file on a remote server :scared:
 

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Where I work, I have to call or email providers regarding lab work and stuff. When I look up the provider that ordered a sample the chart does not tell me if they're an MD (or DO), NP or PA. It just shows their name. So, sometimes I've had the inverse experience of the OP where I've called a PA by Dr. so-and-so. I feel awkward because I don't know if I'm talking or emailing a doctor or not. But, I figure it's better to call a PA a doctor than to offend someone who is a doctor.

If I know them I call them by their first name, though.

(Except for the ones that bug me. I call them something else entirely.)

....J/K
 

Lukkie

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To be honest, if you're using access, you don't really need excel (in most cases, in some cases, they go together perfectly, but not in most cases). In actuality, access and excel are kind of like calculus and algebra. When you're doing calculus, you're using most or all of the features of algebra, but you're able to put it into fluid motion - you're doing dynamic algebra... Same thing with access, you have built in spreadsheets (in tables), to which you can apply formulas (in queries and or reports)... but you can do sooooo much more.

hmm guess i got a lot to figure out this weekend :scared: :scared:
 

majahops

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Your mdapps says your South Asian dude. I'm guessing you're either Chinese or Indian, which means you got SQL in your blood. Don't sweat it :p Or in that case, do sweat it. :p

hmm guess i got a lot to figure out this weekend :scared: :scared:
 

zenlike

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What if they're a Doctor of Science Physician Assistant (DScPA) or a DNP/DrNP (Doctor of Nursing Practice)?
 

TRN1983

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IMHO I'd like to see the word "doctor" be thrown around less liberally. It seems anybody who lobbies for it gets it these days, and unfortunately it is bastardizing a word that people typically (at least used to) associate with a type of professional who the public used to highly trust and respect.

Again, I think Mr. and Mrs. are just fine.
 

rx515

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So a PA it is first name or mr/ms/mrs. It is ok to called someone doctor if their degree has granted that opportunity. Ie. phd, md, do, dvm, dds, dmd, pharmd etc.. Doctor for the degree, physician if they are indeed an md or do
 

kdmt7

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So a PA it is first name or mr/ms/mrs. It is ok to called someone doctor if their degree has granted that opportunity. Ie. phd, md, do, dvm, dds, dmd, pharmd etc.. Doctor for the degree, physician if they are indeed an md or do
I agree with this, but in a clinical setting "Dr." should be reserved only for physicians to minimize confusion.
 

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What if they're a Doctor of Science Physician Assistant (DScPA) or a DNP/DrNP (Doctor of Nursing Practice)?

This is what I was going to point out. There is a definitie possibility they DO have the doctor title. Perhaps if they are offended you ought to double check.
 

singularity2012

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On another similar, yet random note, a person who has obtained a Juris Doctor degree (J.D.) can technically be referred to as as "Dr..." As I understand it, a J.D. is the law equivalent of the M.D. However, there appears to be debate over this. Just look up "Juris Doctor" in wikipedia. It's pretty interesting.
 

take the shot

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The PA's I know go by their first name.

And any PA who insists you call him or her "Doctor" is an idiot.
Ditto
Any PA/ARNP who tells people to call them Dr is an MD wannabee and thinks they know as much as an MD. There is no question that there are several great midlevels out there, but if you're really smart you are acutely cognizant of the limitations of your training and knowledge base. As an ARNP, this is why I want to go to med school!
 

smq123

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As a physician, I'm always going to ask that my co-workers, staff and patients call me by my first name. Because my name isn't Doctor <<last name>>, it's Tim... and I want to know them as people and for them to know me as a person, not as a title.

... but I know I'll be pretty unique in that respect, and that's just fine by me :)

Many of the best doctors I know happen to have this policy, and it always just made sense to me.

When you're a physician (depending on your specialty), your patients might insist on calling you "Doctor" anyway.

Some patients want to be sure that the person taking care of them is a physician, and not just "Tim."

I'm always careful, especially on surgical services, to refer to the residents and the attendings as "Dr. <last name>," even though residents always insist that you address them by their first name. Patients (especially those going in for surgery) are really nervous and tend to freak out that someone other than a physician is going to operate on them.

When I first started rotations, I made the mistake of saying, "Oh, one of the residents, John, will come by and go over your paperwork." The patient freaked out and said, "I don't want a resident operating on me! I want a real physician!" :rolleyes: Never made THAT mistake again.

What are you supposed to call PA's? I mean, they're technically not doctors but I have met a few that will get visibly upset when they don't hear doctor in front of their name.

:confused:

PAs work fewer hours, have less call, and pay less malpractice insurance.

They can't call themselves "Doctor," but that's not a terrible trade, in my opinion.

They might not be getting respect in other ways, and feel like they need something to feel better about themselves. Hence, insisting that people call them "Doctor."
 

Law2Doc

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What if they're a Doctor of Science Physician Assistant (DScPA) or a DNP/DrNP (Doctor of Nursing Practice)?

If you hold yourself out as a doctor in a patient care situation, and you aren't a physician (one permitted by the state as calling themselves doctor in this setting), you are committing fraud. And worse, your insurance carrier will have an "out" if they choose not to cover you. So PA's will never introduce themselves as doctor, if they are smart. Patients may call them doctor, but they will also call the med student doctor, despite it saying medical student multiple times on lapels and badges. You can't fix public perception, you are simply responsible for how you hold yourself out.
 

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I've worked as a pharmacy tech for a couple of years and have had this problem when calling ER's or doctor's offices for Rx changes. I wasn't sure how to address them so I asked a couple of the pharmacists and I was told that saying "PA <last name>" or "NP <last name>" is one appropriate way of addressing them. I feel like just calling them "Tim" is a little too informal. They may not have earned an MD, but they have still accomplished a good deal of advanced education and I like to give them a little respect (not saying calling them, or Dr.'s for that matter, by their first name is disrespectful per se, but until I know their preference, I like to err on the side of formality).
 

Revilla

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I had a college professor who was a P.A. with a PhD. and he also worked at an ER here in town. I was volunteering there once and I had no idea what to call him since he technically was a "doctor." All the patients called him doctor and his lab coat said "Dr. XXX" so that's what I called him, though I felt it was a little deceptive in a medical setting. On his badge, it did say PA-C.
 
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What are you supposed to call PA's? I mean, they're technically not doctors but I have met a few that will get visibly upset when they don't hear doctor in front of their name.

Physican assistants who have earned doctorates (there are more than a few out there) can be addressed as "Doctor" but not in a setting where they are functioning as a physician assistant. All of the physician assistants who have doctorates (Ph.D, Pharm.D etc) have never attempted to introduce themselves as "Doctor" to their patients and quickly correct the patients who attempt to address them as "Doctor".

In an academic setting, if a person has earned a doctorate, (Ph.D, Pharm,D, Ed.D, MD, DO) they may be addressed as "Doctor" but Professor is a far better title and much more respectful. In a clinical setting (outside of psycologists), only physicians should be addressed as "Doctor".
 
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