What do you think my chances are??

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Rdahmad, Dec 12, 2000.

  1. Rdahmad

    Rdahmad New Member

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    Hi everyone. I am still a sophomore in college, but I am worried that the damage I have done to my GPA is severe. First, I have a GPA of around a 2.56, as of my freshman year. I made the stupid mistake of taking 17 credits and taking a job at a lab. I decided it was too much and withdrew late from my Anatomy class. I know that when you withdraw late, you get a WF, which gives you a total of 0 quality points for your GPA. That totally is bothering my sense of confidence. I just completed a term of Bio I and will probably receive a C in it. I have retaken one course and will have to make up that WF by retaking Anatomy. I totally messed up, but I also have outside forces that are affecting my progress, though it doesn't seem I can change them right now. I work as a phlebotomist at a lab (working directly with patients), and I have completed over 100 hours of volunteer work in an ER and on a Chemotherapy floor. I plan on continuing my volunteer work, although with my job and classes, it will not work out at this time. I have wanted to become a doctor (surgeon) ever since I was in 2nd grade, and grades will not be the reason I won't live my dream. I love people, especially helping them when they are most in need. I will opt to go to an international med school if I have to. I would like any advice on where I stand and what I have to do from now on. I know that I will have to try my best from now on (grade wise), and get a really great score on the MCAT. What else is there? Thanks to everyone, I really appreciate it and to the fellow student who referred me here.
     
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  3. DaCrust

    DaCrust Junior Member

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    I think that if you keep on improving with your grades and score a reasonably good MCAT, you'll be fine. From what I've read, med schools take other things into consideration. Your extracurriculars are good. If you're the type of person who does well on interviews, then I you'll probably have a shot. I've read of other people with 4.0's and 30+ MCATs who were turned down because they were not what the school was looking for or they were just lacking in some areas. Just keep believing in yourself and work hard.
     
  4. Vi Carious

    Vi Carious Junior Member

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    A sophomore and junior year of 4.00 puts you at application time at around 3.50 (right in the ballpark). You'll have some explaining to do, but everyone may enjoy hearing it.
     
  5. puffy1

    puffy1 Senior Member

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    First of all, you are taking on too many peripheral activities and not focusing on the most important task right now, and that's your schoolwork. If it's financially possible, quit your lab job, reduce your volunteer work, and commit that extra time to your studies. If you want a realistic shot at med school after 4 years, you are going to have to get your GPA up and do well on the MCAT. Many schools work by a cutoff system; that is, they feed your numbers into a computer, and if you are within a certain range, you will get an interview. If not, better luck next year. So if you continue to do a lot of outside activities and can't do better than a 3.0, you will have to re-evaluate what you feel is most important. What is the point of having all of those hours in research and volunteer work when you can't even get an interview to tell the adcoms about them?

    Take those courses you did badly in again, and FOCUS on doing well in school (>3.8 from now on). And as for the outside forces that might be hindering your performances...hey, not everyone is immune to distractions. People have to deal with crap every day of their lives, and they still have to get the job done. If you think it's tough to succeed now in undergrad, imagine what it will be like in med school and then in the real world as a physician. Succeeding in life is all about having the ability to excel at what you do despite the circumstances; success in medicine is no different.

    If this sounds tough, hey, that's the way it is out there. The path you've chosen for yourself is one of the toughest out there, and you have to be tough with it. Like Master P said, "It's real out there on them streets." You already sound like a person who is willing to do what it takes to become a physician; now all you have to do is figure out exactly "what" is most important right now.
     
  6. lilycat

    Moderator Emeritus

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    I think Puffy1 hit it right on target, and hopefully you don't think this advice is too harsh -- you are just going to have to prioritize your classes ahead of other things right now if you want to have a good shot at med school. When it comes time for the MCAT, you are going to have to make that a priority too, possibly meaning taking time off from your hob, and putting your volunteering on hold, or greatly reducing the hours you currently spend on it. The extracurricular experiences are great, but again, if you can't make the cut to get the interview (which is usually solely based on numbers), the extracurrics. won't do you much good.
     
  7. Rdahmad

    Rdahmad New Member

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    Thanks to everyone who listed their opinion, and to any who will. I understand about "school first." It is kind of ironic, b/c I feel the same way. It is just that the lab called me and offered me an awesome job. I knew it would give a jump, med school wise, and I am afraid what they will tell me if I call it quits b/c I was hired about 2 months ago. I am not currently volunteering, I did all that over the summer. I can't volunteer for now. I am only working 2(8 hour)days a week. I don't know if I mentioned it, but my Freshman year, I had no job. That year, I had to ride the city bus to get to school. It took me 3 hours to get there, and the same to go home, a total of 6 hours a day, which I couldn't spend in total efficiency, school work wise. I love the encouragement, it helps, and I want to thank those few who were willing to give me the push I needed.
    Thanks.

    [This message has been edited by Rdahmad (edited 12-13-2000).]
     
  8. Pathologist

    Pathologist Senior Member

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    I don't think there is any reason you can't work and get your grades up. I'm sure there are plenty of people who do it. Obviously, you're going to have to work really hard. But if you've always wanted to be a doc, then I'm sure you knew you would have to work. Working and doing school work won't leave much time for anything else, but it'll be worth it to make it into medical school. [​IMG]
     
  9. moo

    moo 1K Member

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    Just curious, have you ever considered DO, or even chiropractic medicine? Or are you set on that MD?
     

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