FRA

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Oct 5, 2008
32
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Recently my friend was rejected from podiatry school and was accepted to the Caribbeans. Which do u think is better for her: to re-apply for podiatry school or go to the Caribbeans?? I've heard it's hard to get residency when u graduate from the Caribbeans.
 

McGillGrad

Building Mind and Body
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2002
3,915
22
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Which Caribbean school and is it competitive to get into Pod school?
 

NAVYLABTECH08

DA DOCTOR IS HERE
10+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2007
394
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Okay, your friend does not seem to know what they want in life. Podiatry physician is a toally different path than medical physician, hence the 2 different types of schools. POD is really non-competitive, in regards to med school, in US. As long as your GPA is somewhere around 3.0 and a MCAT >20 = guaranteed acceptance to POD school. First, Your friend needs to determine if she wants to practice of feet/lower leg only or does she want to be a doctor of the whole body. Second, I wonder what carib school accepted someone who got rejected from POD school. (RED FLAG!) Check the accredation. Schools like St. James have no accredation what so ever. Some schools in CArib will not give you a shot at USLME.

1. Big 4 = good
2. MUA= ok-good
3. some of the others- really bad to ok

RESEARCH!!!
 
About the Ads

dragonfly99

Full Member
10+ Year Member
May 15, 2008
5,089
49
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
navylabtech is right
Which type of doctor does she want to be?
I would definitely not go to some (actually most) of the Caribbean medical schools. It means nothing to get a meaningless MD degree if you want to practice in the US later but cannot. You cannot if the school cannot train you to pass the US medical licensing exam and if the school doesn't offer the right training to get you ready for residency in the US. If the school cannot prove than >90% of its student pass the US medical licensing exam, and cannot prove that the vast majority of its graduates get medical residency in the US, then it is not a viable medical school for someone who wants to practice in the US, in my opinion. Your friend needs to do her research. Also, if someone didn't get a 3.0 or so at least in the US in undergrad premedical courses, and can't get 20-something on the MCAT, the person probably won't be able to pass the US medical licensing exam. So the person either needs to study a lot harder or find a career she's better suited to.
 

FRA

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Oct 5, 2008
32
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
she got accepted to AUC..
 

FRA

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Oct 5, 2008
32
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
she got accepted to AUC..and wants to specialize in Obstetrician-Gynecologist
 

McGillGrad

Building Mind and Body
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2002
3,915
22
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Why was she rejected from POD school?
 

McGillGrad

Building Mind and Body
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2002
3,915
22
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
And holy crap, go to AUC. Are you kidding me?
 

NAVYLABTECH08

DA DOCTOR IS HERE
10+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2007
394
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
she got accepted to AUC..and wants to specialize in Obstetrician-Gynecologist


This should again be a no brainer, go to AUC. I question your friend's true desire. For anyone 100% about medicine, a choice betwen podiatry and a medical school is obvious, even if you haev to spend some time on a tropical rock. If medicine is not 100% in your friend's heart, the desolation of the island, the hard classes, and the doubt she has will make her a good candidate to be an drop out candidate. You have to be more focused on the island. Sounds to me that your friend wanted US medical school---> realized she was not competitive--> looked at podiatry as backup---> that did not work----> chose AUC as a last ditch effort never really expecting it to go this far----> and got in. OB/GYN is a real possibility according to the match lists for that school.

PS just make sure she realizes that life on the island is nothing like some small US town and must be willing to adapt and overcome to be able to be successful. :luck:
 

dragonfly99

Full Member
10+ Year Member
May 15, 2008
5,089
49
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
FRA,
tell us more about your friend and her background.
Did she try to get into US MD and DO schools? Was she sort of competitive and just missed getting in, or did she have big problems with her GPA and/or MCAT, or didn't do much medical volunteer work? The odds of getting in to US schools are getting a little better with new schools opening, and old schools increasing their number of spots a little bit. Maybe she just needs to try again in the US? Just asking because it might be worth it to wait a year or two if she can get in...it's easier to get a residency and it's easier to get through school. US schools try everything to help someone pass, and as long as you don't do terribly bad you are pretty much guaranteed to get a residency. A lot more folks fail out of the Caribbean schools and also it's harder to get a residency from there...not impossible as long as you do well, but just harder. Also, she needs to be able to do good clinical rotations during her 3rd and 4th year to start learning how to do surgery and deliver babies (if she wants to do OB/Gyn) and some Caribbean schools have a hard time setting up good clerkships/clinical rotations for all their students. There is a lot of organizing behind doing that, and they have to find doctors to teach all the students, etc.
 

McGillGrad

Building Mind and Body
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2002
3,915
22
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
You have no idea what you're talking about when it comes to Carib schools, do you?



FRA,
tell us more about your friend and her background.
Did she try to get into US MD and DO schools? Was she sort of competitive and just missed getting in, or did she have big problems with her GPA and/or MCAT, or didn't do much medical volunteer work? The odds of getting in to US schools are getting a little better with new schools opening, and old schools increasing their number of spots a little bit. Maybe she just needs to try again in the US? Just asking because it might be worth it to wait a year or two if she can get in...it's easier to get a residency and it's easier to get through school. US schools try everything to help someone pass, and as long as you don't do terribly bad you are pretty much guaranteed to get a residency. A lot more folks fail out of the Caribbean schools and also it's harder to get a residency from there...not impossible as long as you do well, but just harder. Also, she needs to be able to do good clinical rotations during her 3rd and 4th year to start learning how to do surgery and deliver babies (if she wants to do OB/Gyn) and some Caribbean schools have a hard time setting up good clerkships/clinical rotations for all their students. There is a lot of organizing behind doing that, and they have to find doctors to teach all the students, etc.
 

dragonfly99

Full Member
10+ Year Member
May 15, 2008
5,089
49
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
No idea what I'm talking about?
I am not sure what you are getting at.

I can only give advice from my point of view as a fellow at an allopathic hospital in the US, based on what I have seen and a few Caribbean grads I have worked with (attendings and residents), and people I have known (and known of) who have gone to the Caribbean, and some of the experiences I have had with getting medical licenses in a couple of states. A lot of premeds (really most) don't have a clue about all the hurdles one has to get through to practice in the US. I sure didn't. Just trying to be helpful. I don't mean to trash all Caribbean schools or all Caribbean graduates in any way...there's actually a cardiology attending @one of the places I trained who I'm pretty sure went to St George, and everybody respects him. Again, I think a lot of college students, and/or other premeds just don't really get it about medical education being such a rigid process and that you have to pass through so many obstacles (even being at a US school) and sometimes people leap at going to the Caribbean because they got initially disappointed trying to get in to a US school, when rushing to do something may not be in their best interest. I understand that it's even harder to get a spot in med school up in Canada, so I certainly get why people end up making the choice to go to school abroad. It's something I actually considered at one point.
 

McGillGrad

Building Mind and Body
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2002
3,915
22
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
What I'm getting at is that you are making sweeping generalizations and painting with broad strokes when it comes to Caribbean schools.

I am not denying that you are right about the majority of the things you say about the majority of the 30+ Carib schools out there. Many are more business than educational institution. They take advantage of student's desire to find a way to become a physician after falling short in the US.

With that being said, it is even more important to mention the 4-5 exceptions in the Caribbean that provide a legitimate opportunity to sit for the USMLE exams. Yes, they present hurdles in the form of environment and other stressors, but it is more than manageable for the basic science years before completing rotations in more than suitable hospitals for cores and electives.

The fact that you have no Carib experience and have limited exposure to a high number of Caribbean grads automatically disqualifies you from making such definitive statements without making a clear distinction between the decent schools and the ones that should be avoided.


No idea what I'm talking about?
I am not sure what you are getting at.

I can only give advice from my point of view as a fellow at an allopathic hospital in the US, based on what I have seen and a few Caribbean grads I have worked with (attendings and residents), and people I have known (and known of) who have gone to the Caribbean, and some of the experiences I have had with getting medical licenses in a couple of states. A lot of premeds (really most) don't have a clue about all the hurdles one has to get through to practice in the US. I sure didn't. Just trying to be helpful. I don't mean to trash all Caribbean schools or all Caribbean graduates in any way...there's actually a cardiology attending @one of the places I trained who I'm pretty sure went to St George, and everybody respects him. Again, I think a lot of college students, and/or other premeds just don't really get it about medical education being such a rigid process and that you have to pass through so many obstacles (even being at a US school) and sometimes people leap at going to the Caribbean because they got initially disappointed trying to get in to a US school, when rushing to do something may not be in their best interest. I understand that it's even harder to get a spot in med school up in Canada, so I certainly get why people end up making the choice to go to school abroad. It's something I actually considered at one point.
 
About the Ads

dragonfly99

Full Member
10+ Year Member
May 15, 2008
5,089
49
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
The OP posted on here in order to get different perspectives. I'm giving mine as a practicing physician who trained in the US. You are giving yours as a Caribbean medical student.
 

McGillGrad

Building Mind and Body
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2002
3,915
22
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
The least you can do is be objective and use facts. If you cannot, then do not reply.

The fact that you trained in the US is superfluous. In fact, the mere hint that you cannot understand that rejection from POD school means low stats (even for a Carib applicant) sheds light on your dearth of knowledge on the topic.




The OP posted on here in order to get different perspectives. I'm giving mine as a practicing physician who trained in the US. You are giving yours as a Caribbean medical student.
 

howelljolly

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 30, 2007
2,059
10
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
You have no idea what you're talking about when it comes to Carib schools, do you?

You have no idea of how to give good advice, do you?

What DF99 suggested is quite helpful, moreso than your contribution really.

While we are talking abotu AUC, which is one of the top Carribean schools with licensing in all 50 states, what he suggested still holds. All Carribean schools have a huge attrition rate. Even Ross U. loses 1/3 to 1/2 of its students from start to finish.
A majority of Carribean students are probably in the Top5 schools (judging be astonomical frosh class sizes in those schools), and still the Step1 first attempt pass rate is around 50% overall.
The advice to CYA during clinicals is very helpful. Big4 med students do get stuck in sub-par rotations just like everyone else. This is of particular importance since the OPs friend is interested in OB. OB as well as Peds rotations are particularly difficult to schedule as a Carib... let alone a GOOD OB rotation. Additionally, electives in anything besides Med, and Surg subspecialties are almost unheard of in Carribean-US hospital contracts. Electives in gyn-onc, REI, and MFM are not available at any hospital Ive rotated in.... and neither are any peds subpecialty for that matter.

So chill out, and let people with some perspectives besides yours say something.
 

howelljolly

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 30, 2007
2,059
10
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
The least you can do is be objective and use facts. If you cannot, then do not reply.

The fact that you trained in the US is superfluous. In fact, the mere hint that you cannot understand that rejection from POD school means low stats (even for a Carib applicant) sheds light on your dearth of knowledge on the topic.

Evidently the "low stats" arent low enough to be rejected by AUC. This sheds light on your dearth of common sense.
 

RussianJoo

Useless Member
15+ Year Member
Jun 7, 2004
2,231
44
Rock City
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
You have no idea of how to give good advice, do you?

What DF99 suggested is quite helpful, moreso than your contribution really.

While we are talking abotu AUC, which is one of the top Carribean schools with licensing in all 50 states, what he suggested still holds. All Carribean schools have a huge attrition rate. Even Ross U. loses 1/3 to 1/2 of its students from start to finish.
A majority of Carribean students are probably in the Top5 schools (judging be astonomical frosh class sizes in those schools), and still the Step1 first attempt pass rate is around 50% overall.
The advice to CYA during clinicals is very helpful. Big4 med students do get stuck in sub-par rotations just like everyone else. This is of particular importance since the OPs friend is interested in OB. OB as well as Peds rotations are particularly difficult to schedule as a Carib... let alone a GOOD OB rotation. Additionally, electives in anything besides Med, and Surg subspecialties are almost unheard of in Carribean-US hospital contracts. Electives in gyn-onc, REI, and MFM are not available at any hospital Ive rotated in.... and neither are any peds subpecialty for that matter.

So chill out, and let people with some perspectives besides yours say something.

at sgu, we can do MFM and Gyn-Onc months as 4th years if we want. Also we have a requirement to do a peds elective in 4th year and I'll be doing peds endocrine, my other choices were peds development , peds GI, PICU, and peds neurology. And all these are offered at a single hospital in NJ. I don't know what's offered at our NYC hospitals but I am sure it's even more.

I am not bragging just stating some facts.
 

McGillGrad

Building Mind and Body
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2002
3,915
22
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Evidently the "low stats" arent low enough to be rejected by AUC. This sheds light on your dearth of common sense.

Considering that the average for acceptance AUC is a 2.9 and 23 MCAT, why don't you fill me in on how that gives you a chance at US schools?

Next time, at least try to look intelligent when attempting a smart-alec post:laugh:
 

McGillGrad

Building Mind and Body
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2002
3,915
22
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
You have no idea of how to give good advice, do you?

Did you just repeat exactly what I said to someone else:laugh::laugh::laugh:

While we are talking abotu AUC, which is one of the top Carribean schools with licensing in all 50 states, what he suggested still holds. All Carribean schools have a huge attrition rate. Even Ross U. loses 1/3 to 1/2 of its students from start to finish.

You have no stats to back that up, but hey, at least you're consistently wrong. Being consistent is a strong character trait.


A
majority of Carribean students are probably in the Top5 schools (judging be astonomical frosh class sizes in those schools), and still the Step1 first attempt pass rate is around 50% overall.

Once again, made up stats without any proof. Wow, you are just doing awesome today!


So chill out, and let people with some perspectives besides yours say something.

If you had actually given some valid advice, you would have probably made sense. An opinion is not based on false stats. It is based on subjective thoughts. Probably over your head, though. I'll go and draw some pictures for you, maybe. :smuggrin:
 

NAVYLABTECH08

DA DOCTOR IS HERE
10+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2007
394
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
FRA,
tell us more about your friend and her background.
Did she try to get into US MD and DO schools? Was she sort of competitive and just missed getting in, or did she have big problems with her GPA and/or MCAT, or didn't do much medical volunteer work? The odds of getting in to US schools are getting a little better with new schools opening, and old schools increasing their number of spots a little bit. Maybe she just needs to try again in the US? Just asking because it might be worth it to wait a year or two if she can get in...it's easier to get a residency and it's easier to get through school. US schools try everything to help someone pass, and as long as you don't do terribly bad you are pretty much guaranteed to get a residency. A lot more folks fail out of the Caribbean schools and also it's harder to get a residency from there...not impossible as long as you do well, but just harder. Also, she needs to be able to do good clinical rotations during her 3rd and 4th year to start learning how to do surgery and deliver babies (if she wants to do OB/Gyn) and some Caribbean schools have a hard time setting up good clerkships/clinical rotations for all their students. There is a lot of organizing behind doing that, and they have to find doctors to teach all the students, etc.


If The OP's friend got rejected from US POD school, she had <1 % chance of getting into a US med school (MD & DO included) I have no idea what AUC's admissions stats are, but I wonder what her friend told them to get in. POD schools take GPAs in the low 2s with high MCAT or MCAT as low as 18 with a >3.3 GPA. This means the OP's friend has a <3.0 GPA or a <22 MCAT. Both disqualify from US med schools. Even Ross won't admit you in with those stats, they will MERP you. The real debate here is, what was the OP freind's real STATS. Either way, she is admitted to AUC and shuold continue on her path towards OB/GYN.

Dragonfly is correct in the fact that because of class size, it is hard to schedule good year 3 & 4 rotations. This could delay your graduation date, especially if you start in May, January, or have to repeat COMP or a step. Either way, AUC will get the OP's friend where she needs to go. I would argue to point if she on;y wanted to do neurosurgery or derm or somthing competitive like that, but Ob/Gyn is reachable from AUC. Again, OP's friend should go to AUC since she is already admitted.

PS: Be warned Op's friend. If a low mcat was the reason for not gaining POD acceptance, the USLME is a longer and badder test. Going to AU means you need to score higher on USLME and class rank to secure a spot in something other than FP and IM. As long as you put the work in, AUC will make it happen.
 
Last edited:

McGillGrad

Building Mind and Body
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2002
3,915
22
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Dragonfly is correct in the fact that because of class size, it is hard to schedule good year 3 & 4 rotations. This could delay your graduation date, especially if you start in May, January, or have to repeat COMP or a step.

No, Dragonfly is absolutely incorrect.

AUC has a max class size of 180 in fall and less than 100 in Jan and May.

Ross and SGU have class sizes in the 300s and 400s and that is why they sometimes have issues.

Hence, my previous posts about knowing facts before posting false info.

FYI-
SGU gained tons of new spots in New York for cores and electives.

AUC signed a new contract for another clinical center in Long Island for cores and electives.
 

howelljolly

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 30, 2007
2,059
10
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Whats the point of any your counters?

The question is a) go to AUC with the intention of becoming an OB/Gyn vs. b) re-apply to podiatry school.

What the underlying question is: a)go to AUC with the intention of becoming an OB/Gyn knowing that like many Carib students, she might never make it. vs b) re-apply to podiatry school which she might not get into again, or might get in, and then persue a carreer that she may not really want.

If you want stats, look them up yourself. Ross currently has three incoming classes of 200 each - or 600 per year. Their annual residency match list is 200 - 250 individuals. Its a long 11 page document that Im not going to cut and paste here. But from an "physician shortage" activist group:
Each year, about 2,500 U.S. citizens
enter a foreign medical school, and about 1,400 U.S. citizens who attended schools in foreign
countries enter residency training programs.

Regarding the pass rate for step1 here are some slightly old stats from a FSMB document. I dont care enough to find a newer one.
The same cannot be said of U.S. IMG performance on Steps 1 and 2. U.S. IMG first-taker​
performance on Step 1 has declined since 1998 with 2004 seeing a 53% pass rate;
About the number of US IMGs
The number of U.S. citizens obtaining ECFMG certification has doubled over
the past decade from 527 in 1995 to 1,360 in 2004
So, if you add up all the test takers from the 30 Carib schools you'll get a pretty big number, this data is a pretty decent surrogate for Carib students, confounded by the fewer US-IMGs in UK, Philippines, and India. Additionally, the ECFMG has data which I can't find right now that shows that the highest pass rates for IMGs are in #1-India, and #2-Phillippines, so the confounder is actually making your pass rate look BETTER.

Additionally... the above data shows that the rise in US-IMGs over those 9 years corresponds in time with a fall in the passing rate. And both of these correspond with the increasing number of Carib schools. From a Nephrology journal: Outside LCME, the number of Caribbean medical schools has increased from four in 1980 to 20 in 2007 Other sources will tell you that there are 30 or 40 Carribean schools now, and that the increase has happened in the last decade but I dont feel like cutting and pasting. So you decide. Are these changes in the USMLE pass rate due to the increasing number of students in Carribean schools, or an increasing number of Americans in UK, and Asian schools?

You can look up all the stats you want. They dont make a difference. The point is if you go to a Caribbean school you have an uphill battle. If you dont agree with that, then I dont know what to tell you.

All youve shown is that you didnt know these stats yourself, and tried to call me out. That just makes you look like a stupid stupid individual.
 

McGillGrad

Building Mind and Body
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2002
3,915
22
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
You really think that cutting and pasting all types of misleading info will make you look any less foolish?

First, Ross is not the best example, but let's go with it. Truth is that their list is of those who volunteered to let the school know where they matched. Therefore, your point is invalidated and you are wrong.

Score 1-0

Secondly, USIMG stats from 30+ schools mean nothing when talking about 4 schools out of 30 that actually provide a proper education. If you knew anything, you would realize that the 90%+ pass rate at the top 4 schools (in the past 5-6 year) is a direct result of their policy of passing comprehensive exams before being allowed to sit for the step. Therefore, if you cannot cut it, you can't go on to lower the pass rate. So your random skewed stats mean nothing....again

Score 2-0

Finally, the newest study referring to Carib pass rates shows that SGU and Ross have verifiable rates of "USMLE Step 1 :SGU: 84.4 Ross: 69.7 " over the past 15 years. Those aren't super-great but they certainly aren't what you are saying. The difference is, I have facts that are relevant, not random stats. Acad Med. 2008;83(10 Suppl):S33-S36

Score 3-0

I suggest you stop making yourself look foolish.

I don't blame you for trying to defend yourself, but next time try to have facts on your side. It really helps:laugh::laugh::laugh:




Whats the point of any your counters?

The question is a) go to AUC with the intention of becoming an OB/Gyn vs. b) re-apply to podiatry school.

What the underlying question is: a)go to AUC with the intention of becoming an OB/Gyn knowing that like many Carib students, she might never make it. vs b) re-apply to podiatry school which she might not get into again, or might get in, and then persue a carreer that she may not really want.

If you want stats, look them up yourself. Ross currently has three incoming classes of 200 each - or 600 per year. Their annual residency match list is 200 - 250 individuals. Its a long 11 page document that Im not going to cut and paste here. But from an "physician shortage" activist group:
Each year, about 2,500 U.S. citizens
enter a foreign medical school, and about 1,400 U.S. citizens who attended schools in foreign
countries enter residency training programs.

Regarding the pass rate for step1 here are some slightly old stats from a FSMB document. I dont care enough to find a newer one.
The same cannot be said of U.S. IMG performance on Steps 1 and 2. U.S. IMG first-taker​
performance on Step 1 has declined since 1998 with 2004 seeing a 53% pass rate;
About the number of US IMGs
The number of U.S. citizens obtaining ECFMG certification has doubled over
the past decade from 527 in 1995 to 1,360 in 2004
So, if you add up all the test takers from the 30 Carib schools you'll get a pretty big number, this data is a pretty decent surrogate for Carib students, confounded by the fewer US-IMGs in UK, Philippines, and India. Additionally, the ECFMG has data which I can't find right now that shows that the highest pass rates for IMGs are in #1-India, and #2-Phillippines, so the confounder is actually making your pass rate look BETTER.

Additionally... the above data shows that the rise in US-IMGs over those 9 years corresponds in time with a fall in the passing rate. And both of these correspond with the increasing number of Carib schools. From a Nephrology journal: Outside LCME, the number of Caribbean medical schools has increased from four in 1980 to 20 in 2007 Other sources will tell you that there are 30 or 40 Carribean schools now, and that the increase has happened in the last decade but I dont feel like cutting and pasting. So you decide. Are these changes in the USMLE pass rate due to the increasing number of students in Carribean schools, or an increasing number of Americans in UK, and Asian schools?

You can look up all the stats you want. They dont make a difference. The point is if you go to a Caribbean school you have an uphill battle. If you dont agree with that, then I dont know what to tell you.

All youve shown is that you didnt know these stats yourself, and tried to call me out. That just makes you look like a stupid stupid individual.
 

howelljolly

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 30, 2007
2,059
10
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
The Federation of State Medical Boards, and the American Medical Assn. not "random stats" but you didn't know that. Heres an AMA position paper on this topic: http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/site/free/prl10116.htm

Its nice that youve found one study that specifically looks at the Big4. I wonder who wrote it. It seems from the quote that they did not specifically look at FIRST ATTEMPT pass rate. If you put a goat in front of that computer and let it pound away at the keyboard, it is bound to pass the USMLE by the second or third attempt.

In any event, if you need stats to prove to yourself that you are in a good position, and that you'll make it, thats ok.
 

dunmaglas

Full Member
10+ Year Member
May 5, 2008
33
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
I'm sort of coming at this a priori, so please bear with me. I can't really figure out where McGillGrad is coming from, other than being hyper sensitive to perceived criticism of carribean schools in general which you feel is being projected towards your school in particular. I don't think anybody here is questioning the quality of the education you are receiving, so please relax. We are (I think) all adults here, and as such are hopefully capable of civilized intelligent debate. As far as I can tell this forum isn't about you, it is about the OP and their friend who are looking for advice. You are clearly free to give your opinion on this matter, and it is surely of value as you have direct experience. But I fail to see how attacking other posters in such a obviously belligerently negative manner is of benefit to anybody except yourself. I'm sure it is pleasent to revel in the little boosts to your ego that surely result from "crushing" the opinions of other individuals but as I said before; please. relax.

That being said, I can't help but think that the general opinion is that in an ideal situation, the OP's friend should do everything in their power to make themselves competitive for acceptance to a US med school. Depending on their situation this could include everything from rewriting the MCAT to volunteering, boosting the GPA with a year or more of extra courses to getting research experience, either summer research or getting into a graduate program. If the logisitics of such an endeavor are outside the realm of reason (unless this individual is willing to wait another 2-3 years to get into med school they probably are), and a career in medicine is truly what this individual desires, then attending AUC is the most logical course of action. This individual must be cautioned however, that such a path requries a great deal of dedication, more so than would be required of a medical student in the US who will have a relatively 'easier' time not ony getting through medical school but with matching as well. To the OP, I wish your friend the best of luck in her future endeavours, whatever they may be.
 

dragonfly99

Full Member
10+ Year Member
May 15, 2008
5,089
49
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Let's keep it civil if we can.
Some good points on both sides.
McGill, I never said that SGU doesn't provide a good education or that it has a low USMLE pass rate. I'm still not impressed with the 70% or so pass rate of USMLE at Ross. Really the pass rate should be 90% or so, otherwise it worries me...med school is a big investment of time and money to make if one has only a 70% chance to pass the USMLE. It may reflect the preparation and abilities of the students, +/- the educational opportunities @Ross. I don't know.

As far as the OP's post, I would be concerned with that student either enrolled at a Caribbean med school OR going to podiatry school at this point. I certainly know that the OP wasn't academically competitive for a US school if she/he didn't get into podiatry school (at least very likely was not). However, grades and things like an MCAT score and volunteer experience can often be improved. We don't know that 2 or 3 years down the line, the person couldn't be competitive, at least for a DO school. We don't know anything about how and whether this person has explored different health care careers.

IMHO, going to any Caribbean school without being academically prepared and with a low undergrad GPA and MCAT score and hoping against hope that she/he will pass the USMLE test (which is absolutely required for ANY US physician residency such as OB/Gyn) is a recipe for personal and financial disaster. A reassessment of the entire situation, along with some professional career counseling before making any rash decisions, would be a great idea. If this person just wants to deliver babies, how about working toward becoming a registered nurse midwife? That would require academic dedication too, but not as many long painful years of sitting in a classroom. If the person really wants to do podiatry, then perhaps taking some extra classes to raise the GPA and volunteering with a podiatrist might secure her entry into a US podiatry school.
 

NAVYLABTECH08

DA DOCTOR IS HERE
10+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2007
394
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
i agree with the previous 2 posts. I think that Mcgill is walking around puffy for no reason. I bet you ae getting a great education where you come from. In ragards to class sizes, I was targetting ROSS. I am just really concerned with somone's ability to make it in a cut throat MED SCHOOL BUSINESS like the Caribbeans by questing the decision to reapply to podiatry schools in US. It just seems like the OP's friend is conflicted and needs to get focused before she makes a 200K decision.
 

dragonfly99

Full Member
10+ Year Member
May 15, 2008
5,089
49
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Yes, navylabtechdoc, that was one of my points.
This is a 100k-200k decision that requires 4+ years of training (I think podiatry school is 4 years?) whichever one she chooses. Perhaps the podiatry school sensed the person's ambivalence and/or lack of commitment to podiatry and that might be part of why they rejected her.
 

howelljolly

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 30, 2007
2,059
10
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Its possible that they sensed the disinterest in podiatry. Ive done few trans-met amputations with the Pod. Podiatry is a different ball of wax. Hemostasis, surgical technique, drugs... are different. And they really think about mechanics... engeneering, physics...center of gravity, stress, that sort of thing. Really interesting how theres two totally different ways to do the same thing.
anyway.
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 12 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.